Angels Landing Permits & Hiking

 
Line of people standing next to chains waiting to climb trail to Angels Landing.
Near the top of Angels Landing.

NPS

Background

Angels Landing is one of the most popular destinations in Zion National Park. Many who go there want to experience untamed adventure and get a classic photograph. Its' now famous name descends from Methodist minister Frederick Vining Fisher who, on his first visit to Zion Canyon in 1916 allegedly quipped only an angel could land there.

The hike is strenuous, and your safety is your responsibility. We have some tips to help reduce the risks you take and ensure you have an enjoyable hike.

Angels Landing Pilot Permit Program

In response to concerns about crowding and congestion on the trail, on and after April 1, 2022, everyone who hikes Angels Landing needs to have a permit. The pilot permit program reflects lessons learned when we metered the number of hikers on the trail in 2019 and 2021 and by distributing tickets to use the park shuttle system in response to COVID-19 in 2020.

 

Getting and managing your permit

Get, make limited changes to or cancel your permit.

You can apply for a permit before your trip. You will get to pick seven ranked days and times or windows of days and times you want to hike.

Find the date you plan to be in Zion and use recreation.gov to apply for a permit during your application window.


When to apply

 

Hike Dates (hyperlinked to lottery

Lottery Opens 

Lottery Closes 

Permits Issued 

April 1 to May 31 

January 3 

January 20 

January 25 

June 1 to August 31 (link to be added soon) 

April 1 

April 20 

April 25 

September 1 to November 30 (link to be added soon) 

July 1 

July 20 

July 25 

December 1 to February 28, 2023 (link to be added soon)

October 1 

October 20 

October 25 

Note: It costs $6 to apply for a seasonal permit. The fee covers an application for up to 6 people (including the person filling out the application). This fee is non-refundable.


 

Learning the lottery outcome

On the days we issue permits, recreation.gov will send you an email that says:
  • You got a permit and have been charged $3 for each person you registered.
    • If you cancel your permit at least two days before your hike, we will refund the $3 per person fee.
    • You can get your permit by logging in to your account on recreation.gov

or


 
  • You did not get a permit and can consider applying again the day before your hike or for a future Seasonal Lottery.

     

After you get your permit

You will get an email from recreation.gov confirming that you got a permit. This confirmation email serves as your permit. Print or download a copy of the confirmation email and bring it with you on your hike. Mobile phone service is unreliable at the permit checkpoint so be sure to print or download before you arrive. 

When to apply

You can apply for a permit the day before your planned hike. On and after March 31, 2022, this lottery opens every day at 12:01 a.m. and closes at 3 p.m. Mountain Time (MT).


Note: It costs $6 to apply for a permit. The fee covers an application for up to 6 people (including the person filling out the application). This fee is non-refundable.
 

How to time your application

Apply on the day before you want to hike between 12:01 a.m. and 3 p.m. MT.

For example: If you want to hike on a Tuesday, you need to apply between 12:01 a.m. and 3 p.m. MT on Monday. We will issue permits at 4 p.m. MT on Monday.
 

Learning the lottery outcome

At 4 p.m. MT on the day you apply, we will an email to let you know:

 
  • You got a permit and have been charged $3 per person you registered.
    • This fee is not refundable.
    • You can get your permit by logging in to your account on recreation.gov

or

  • You did not get a permit and can try again in a future lottery.
     

After you get your permit

You will get an email from recreation.gov confirming that you got a permit. This confirmation email serves as your permit. Print or download a copy of the confirmation email and bring it with you on your hike. Mobile phone service is unreliable at the permit checkpoint so be sure to print or download before you arrive. 

Cancellation Policy


Seasonal Lottery

If you get a permit using the seasonal lottery, you can cancel the permit until two days before the permit reservation date for a full refund of the $3 per person fee. The $6 application fee is not refundable. Canceled seasonal lottery permits will automatically roll into the day-before lottery.


Day-before Lottery

You cannot change your permit. All fees are non-refundable.

 

Change Policy


Seasonal Lottery

You can reduce the group size on your permit until two days before the permit reservation date. If you reduce the number of people on your permit, you will get a refund for the $3 per person fee for each person you take off of the permit. The $6 application fee is not refundable. 

Example: If you have a permit to hike on a Friday, June 24, you can cancel it or reduce the number of people on it until 11:59 p.m. MT on the Wednesday, June 22. If you reduce the number of people on your permit or cancel it, recreation.gov will refund the $3 per person fee for each person who is removed or canceled.


You cannot:

  • Increase the number of people in your group
  • Change the date of your hike
  • Change the permitee (transfer the permit).
  • Change to an alternate leader.

Permits are not transferable.

 

Day-before Lottery

You cannot change your permit. All fees are non-refundable.

 
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Learn how to apply for a permit on recreation.gov to hike at Angels Landing in Zion National Park.

Learn more about hiking at Angels Landing

 
 
Angels Landing hike with hikers on the rim of the trail.
Angels Landing

NPS

After you get a permit

Prepare for your hike! Along this 5.4 mile round-trip hike, you will gain 1,488 feet in elevation.

M
ost hikers take around 4 hours to complete the hike, but some take longer. Check the shuttle schedule before you leave to make sure you do not miss the last shuttle. Print or download your permit and carry a flashlight or headlamp with new batteries, some food and lots of water just in case you end up out later than you planned. The trail is well marked, but bring a park map in case you get disoriented.

Follow these ranger tips to get ready for your hike.

 

Before your hike

Plan ahead and prepare to climb Angels Landing!

You need to print or download the confirmation email from recreation.gov that says you got a permit (this serves as your permit) before you get to the trailhead. A ranger may check your permit at the Grotto (Shuttle Stop 6), at Scout Lookout or along the trail. If you do not have your permit with you, we may not allow you to take your hike.

Bring broken-in boots with good ankle support and good traction. Some of the most common injuries Angels Landing hikers suffer are blisters and ankle injuries; good footwear is the best way to prevent these problems.

 

Even if you have a permit, it may not be advisable for you to hike if the weather is bad when you are in Zion.

It is dangerous to be at Angels Landing during rain or thunder storms. Check the weather forecast before your hike, and try to plan to avoid bad weather. Thunder storms can happen any time, but they happen more often in the afternoon.

If you are on the trail and see storm clouds coming, stop.  Do not keep climbing. If possible, leave the area and begin your descent. Use caution at all times if you are on the part of the trail with chains.
For most of the year, you can only get to the start of the trail by riding a shuttle bus. The park shuttle route begins at the Zion Canyon Visitor Center. Park your vehicle at the visitor center or in Springdale and use the shuttles to enter Zion Canyon. Most hikers start from Shuttle Stop 6, the Grotto.

During the few weeks in the winter and spring when the shuttle is not running, you will drive yourself to the trailhead. Please park on the pavement. If parking is full, you will need to park farther away and walk back to the trail.
 

At the trailhead

Most hikers choose to start from Shuttle Stop 6, the Grotto.  The time printed on your permit is when you need to be at the Grotto.  Leave time to get to the Grotto before the start time printed on your permit.

A ranger may check your permit before you start on the trail.
One of the easiest ways to ensure a safe, enjoyable hike is to be sure to have plenty of water. Weather conditions and personal preference affect the amount of water you need, but we suggest every person in Zion drink 1 gallon (4 liters) per day. Angels Landing usually takes at least a half day to hike.

You can fill your water bottles at the Grotto shuttle stop, but you will not find drinkable water anywhere else on the trail. Please fill your water bottles at the start of the hike.
We suggest that you go to the bathroom before you start the hike. You can use a flush toilets at the Visitor Center before you get on the park shuttle or at the Grotto shuttle stop.

If you have to go after you are on the trail, you need to put solid human waste and toilet paper in a plastic bag and carry it back with you.  Bring a bag and toilet paper with you in case you need it later.

If you leave human waste on the trail, we may give you a citation, and you may have to pay a fine.
It is important to leave this place the way you found it. This way, future generations will be able to enjoy the park unimpaired. Never leave anything behind and try to be considerate of others. Specifically:
  • Protect the canyon walls, rocks, and trees from graffiti and vandalism.
  • Leave rocks as you find them and do not stack rock cairns.
  • Protect the natural sounds of the canyon by talking softly and using headphones for music.
For more information, take the Zion Pledge.
 

On the trail

The hike to Angels Landing is strenuous. Your safety on the trail is your responsibility, and we want to share some tips so that you reduce the risks and have an enjoyable hike.

One of the easiest ways to ensure a safe, enjoyable hike is to be sure to have plenty of water. Weather conditions and personal preference affect the amount of water you need, but we suggest every person in Zion drink 1 gallon (4 liters) per day. Angels Landing usually takes at least a half day to hike.

You do not need a permit to go to Scout Lookout. 
 

You do need a permit to go past Scout Lookout on to the part of the trail with Chains.


For many people, Scout Lookout is a reasonable stopping point. You will have to hike the West Rim Trail  from Zion Canyon to this viewpoint. and you will covering most of the distance and elevation gain for the hike.

If you or someone in your group has a fear of heights, consider splitting up here and regrouping at a specified time and place. It can be a great option to head up the West Rim Trail to get views overlooking Angels Landing and Zion Canyon. You do not need a permit to hike on the West Rim Trail.

Even if you have a permit, it may not be advisable for you to hike if the weather is bad when you are in Zion.

Do not attempt to ascend if:

  • Storm clouds are in the area.

  • The ground is wet or icy (the rock becomes very slick when wet; most accidents on the chains occur during wet conditions).

  • It is dark or will be dark before you finish.

  • You have any fear of heights.


Watch for rockfall

Rockfall hazards occur throughout the park and are especially high near any cliff face. If you witness a rockfall, quickly move away from the cliff.

If you are near the base of a cliff or talus (loose rock) slope when a rockfall happens and cannot quickly move away from the base of the cliff, immediately seek shelter behind the largest nearby boulder and pull your backpack over your head. After rocks have stopped falling, move quickly as far away from the base of the cliff as possible.

Be aware that rockfalls can occur at any time. Pay attention to your surroundings, stay off of closed trails, and, if unsure, keep away from cliffs.

You need to have a permit to hike the Angels Landing chains.


The most famous--or infamous--part of the hike is the ascent up the chains. The single metal chain offers hikers something to hold during the last half mile of trail along a knife-edge ridge. Since 1930, the majority of deadly accidents have taken place on this section of trail.

Do not leave the path. It is easy to get hurt if you are irresponsible.
 
  • Take your time and be patient with slower hikers.

  • Allow faster hikers to pass you (when possible).

  • Where available, remain within reach of the chains.
  • Be considerate. There are many places that are only safe for one person to travel the two-way route. Communicate and take turns with others.
  • In winter, the metal chains are very cold. Gloves may be useful.

Keep wildlife wild: respect them from a distance. Squirrels, ravens, chipmunks, and other animals live along the trail; never feed them or allow them to get your food. Do not leave your pack unattended (e.g., at the base of the chains or while you take a nap). 

California condors are the largest bird in North America and you might see one near Angels Landing. Please respect these critically endangered birds by keeping your distance. Never feed or approach a condor.

Pack it in, pack it out

There are no trash cans on the trail. While hiking in Zion, be sure to pack out all trash.

Don't let your belongings become trash. Secure them so that they do not fall. Water bottles falling from backpack side pockets and hats blowing off heads are common lost belongings that can accidentally litter in the park.

When possible, you can help park rangers by picking up trash on the trail. Put trash in a can by the trailhead.

Don't Roll Rocks

In Zion, you will commonly be above other people and wildlife. Do not throw anything over the edge of the trail. Angels Landing is a nesting area for many birds and rock climbers are often below. A falling rock could injure or kill.

 

 

Logistics and other information

Emergencies

Even if you plan well and bring the right equipment, you might still have problems. If you need help, try to call 911. If you have cell and/or data service, a call will connect you with the Zion Dispatch Office.

If you do not have cell and/or data service (most people cannot connect to a mobile network in Zion Canyon), find a park ranger or park volunteer on the trail or at a trailhead.

More Information

 

Last updated: January 5, 2022

Contact the Park

Mailing Address:

Zion National Park
1 Zion Park Blvd.
State Route 9

Springdale , UT 84767

Phone:

(435) 772-3256
Listen to recorded park information 24 hours a day. Staff answer phone calls from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Mountain Time. You can also email zion_park_information@nps.gov.

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