Basic Information

Comprised of 4 million acres on the Alaska Peninsula in southwest Alaska, Lake Clark is one of the nation's most remote national park units. Established by the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act (ANILCA) on December 2, 1980, the park and preserve support an ongoing tradition of subsistence culture in a volcanic and partly glaciated landscape containing habitat for wilderness dependent species of fish and wildlife.

Lake Clark offers excellent opportunities for adventure, exploration, learning, and just plain having fun! Start planning your visit by using the links below to learn about the park.

 

Lake Clark National Park and Preserve is located on the Alaska Peninsula southwest of Anchorage and west of Homer. We are not on the road system. The address provided below is for the park's field office in Port Alsworth, AK.

GPS coordinates are provided for some locations listed on the Places to Go page.

1 Park Place
Port Alsworth, AK 99653

Lake Clark is located on the Alaska Peninsula southwest of Anchorage and north of Katmai National Park. It is not on the road system; therefore, in order to get here you must travel either via plane or by boat. A one to two-hour flight from Anchorage, Kenai, or Homer will provide access to most points within Lake Clark. Fixed-wing aircraft are allowed to land on all suitable lakes, rivers, beaches, gravel bars, and open ground in both the park and preserve unless the area is closed or otherwise restricted.

Operating Hours & Seasons Details

Lake Clark National Park and Preserve

The park and preserve are open 24 hours per day, seven days per week year round. However, visitor services are limited Labor Day through Memorial Day. Seasonal and temporary closures are listed by location on the Operating Hours & Seasons page.

Standard Hours

  • Sunday: Open 24 hours
  • Monday: Open 24 hours
  • Tuesday: Open 24 hours
  • Wednesday: Open 24 hours
  • Thursday: Open 24 hours
  • Friday: Open 24 hours
  • Saturday: Open 24 hours

 

Lake Clark has two distinct climate areas: the coast and the interior. The coast is wetter and experiences milder temperatures. The interior gets half to one fourth as much precipitation, but temperatures are hotter in summer and colder in winter. Frost and snow can occur any time parkwide, but are most common from September to early June. Lakes here typically begins freezing in November and melting in April. Ice conditions dictate whether planes need floats or skis to land on lakes.

Permits & Reservations Details

Entrance Fees:

Lake Clark Entrance and User Fees - $0.00

You do not need to pay fees, make reservations, or obtain permits from the National Park Service for any recreational activities in the park including backpacking, camping, river running, bear viewing, or visiting Dick Proenneke's cabin. Information regarding hunting and fishing license requirements, voluntary backcountry registration forms, and the permits commercial film crews or scientists conducting research and collecting items need to obtain are available on the Permits & Reservations page.

Entrance Passes:

None - $0.00

No entrance passes are necessary to enter Lake Clark National Park and Preserve.

Port Alsworth Visitor Center

Open in the summer only, the visitor center is located midway up the eastern-most runway in Port Alsworth. Speak with a ranger, receive assistance with any final trip planning needs, obtain free park brochures, purchase a souvenir at the Alaska Geographic bookstore, or watch free films about Dick Proenneke and other aspects of the park.

Contact the Park

Mailing Address:

General Delivery
Port Alsworth, AK 99653

Phone:

(907) 781-2117

Contact Us