Bicycling Information

Bicycling Information On This Page Navigation

 
Three images, from left to right, park shuttle bus carrying several bicycles up front in an external rack. A bicycle in campsite with blue tent. Bicycle rental facility with attendant talking with two customers.
 

South Rim


Looking to exchange four wheels for two? Bicycling is a great way to experience the South Rim. Cyclists can enjoy approximately 13 miles (21 km) of roads and Greenway Trails that allow for more intimate explorations along the rim. If you get tired, load your bike on one of the park’s bicycle-friendly shuttle buses - there is a bus stop every one-half to one-mile along the 13 mile-stretch.

Bicycles are allowed on all paved and unpaved roads on the South Rim. Be good to yourself and the environment – ride instead of drive.
 
Image: 2 bicyclists riding along a paved greenway path along the edge of a colorful canyon landscape
Cyclists riding along the Hermit Road Greenway. Photo courtesy Sarah Neal.
 

Hermit Road


Scenic Hermit Road follows the canyon rim for 7 miles (11 km) and is one of the best places in the park for cycling. Most of the year, private vehicle restrictions eliminate most traffic. Shuttle and tour buses do utilize the road, so cyclists should pull to the right shoulder in a safe location, dismount and let buses pass.

The Hermit Road Greenway Trail, between Monument Creek Vista and Hermits Rest, provides a 2.8-mile (4.5 km) bicycle path away from the road and, in places, along the rim of Grand Canyon.

 
top of sign shows map of Hermit Road Greenway. Text reads: The Hermit Road section of the Greenway Trail accommodates hikers, bicyclists, and visitors using wheelchairs. The trail meets Accessibility Guidelines for Outdoor Developed Areas.
The Hermit Road section of the Greenway Trail accommodates hikers, bicyclists, and visitors using wheelchairs. The trail meets Accessibility Guidelines for Outdoor Developed Areas. Much of the trail follows the 1912 alignment of Hermit Road. There are six overlooks, including Pima Point, in addition to multiple resting areas along the trail.
 

South Kaibab Trailhead and Yaki Point


Looking for a scenic, yet shorter cycling opportunity? Follow the paved Greenway Trail to the South Kaibab Trailhead and then ride along Yaki Point Road to Yaki Point. Access the Greenway near Grand Canyon Visitor Center and follow the South Kaibab Trailhead signs. In about 2.4 miles (3.9 km), you will come to the trailhead parking area. From here, turn right and follow the trailhead road until you come to Yaki Point Road. Make a left and follow it 0.5 miles (0.8 km) to Yaki Point. There are plenty of spectacular canyon views along the Greenway Trail and once you reach Yaki Point.

Like Hermit Road, private vehicle restrictions eliminate most traffic. Shuttle and tour buses do utilize Yaki Point Road, so cyclists should pull to the right shoulder in a safe location, dismount and let buses pass.

If you become tired of cycling, you can catch the Orange Shuttle (Kaibab Rim Route) at Yaki Point, The South Kaibab Trailhead, or Pipe Creek Overlook, put your bike in the front rack, and ride the bus back to the Visitor Center.
 
a woman boarding a white and green bus with a rack with two bicycles in front.
Returning with bicycles to the Visitor Center on the Tusayan Shuttle, after riding the 6.5 mile (10.4 km) Greenway trail from Grand Canyon Village to the gateway town of Tusayan.
 

Park in Tusayan & Ride the Shuttle


Want to leave the long entrance lines and parking frustrations behind? Ride the Tusayan Shuttle into the park and then cycle along the roads and Greenway Trails. If you get tired, there is a bus stop every one-half to one mile along the 13-mile road/trail system – load your bike on one of the shuttle bus bike racks and take the bus to your next destination. And if you are looking for a fun, mostly downhill ride back to Tusayan – pick up the Greenway Trail near Grand Canyon Visitor Center and follow the signs to Tusayan. It is a 6.5-mile (10.5 km), downhill ride on a smooth, paved trail.

You can also ride your bike into the park from Tusayan, but be prepared for a steady, 6.5-mile uphill ride and no services, including water or cell phone coverage, until the Grand Canyon Visitor Center.

You must have a valid park pass to ride the Tusayan Shuttle.
 
Bright Angel Bicycle Logo shows silhouettes of canyon cliffs within a circle of bicycle wheel spokes.

Bicycle Rental & Tour Info


Don’t have a bike with you? Rent one from Bright Angel Bicycles, adjacent to the Grand Canyon Visitor Center.

Bright Angel Bicycles provides rentals and guided bicycle tours between mid-March and October 31. When the weather permits, rentals and tours may be offered at other times of the year - check their website for current availability.

There is also a small coffee bar and café with a grab & go menu targeted toward hikers, bikers and pedestrians. The café is open year-round.

Bicycle Repairs


Cyclists should always carry a small repair kit. However, if you cannot repair your bicycle, Bright Angel Bicycles offers these services.
 

Rules of the Road/Safety


Cycling is a great way to experience the South Rim of the Grand Canyon; however, please remember the following rules and guidelines:

Cyclists…
  • Are subject to the same traffic rules as automobiles & share the road with vehicles
  • Should use extreme caution when riding on park roads - shoulders are narrow & vehicle traffic is heavy
  • Should ride single file with the flow of traffic - there are no designated cycling lanes
  • Must wear a helmet
  • Should see and be seen - wear bright colors
  • Must load and unload their own bikes from park shuttle buses
  • Should safely pull to the right side of the road, dismount and let buses pass (applies to Hermit and Yaki Point roads only)
  • Must yield to pedestrians & let them know you are approaching from behind with a bell or calm voice
  • Should bring sufficient water and snacks
  • Should acclimatize – the South Rim is at 7,000 feet (2,134 m) above sea level
  • Be prepared for possible weather changes

Bicycles are prohibited below the rim/in the canyon and along any paved or unpaved portion of the Rim Trail.
 
a yellow bicycle next to a tree and a blue tent, with a row of blue tents in the forested background.

Touring/Camping


Traveling to the South Rim via bicycle?

Bicyclist campsites are available at Mather Campground on a first-come, first-serve basis. Bicycle/backpacker sites are $6.00 per person, per night.

NO cars are allowed.
 

WARNING:

The South Rim of Grand Canyon averages 7,000 feet / 2,134 meters above sea level. The North Rim averages 8,000 feet / 2,438. Visitors with respiratory or heart problems may experience difficulties. Exercising at this elevation can be strenuous. Please use caution and when engaging in any physical activities and use care not to push yourself. Always check the weather before exercising outside.

 
an hard-packed dirt path with rock lining on either side, winding through a forested area.
The North Rim Bridle Path is 1.2 miles (2 km) one-way and 45 minutes one-way. It connects Grand Canyon Lodge with North Kaibab Trailhead. Pets on a leash and bicycles are permitted on this hard-packed trail.
 

North Rim

The North Rim also has cycling opportunities to allow for more intimate explorations through this delightful, forested landscape.

Bridle Path

The Bridle Path is a hard-packed, multiuse trail that traverses the forest in the North Rim developed area. It is a 1.9 mile (3.1 km) trail that connects the North Kaibab Trailhead with the Grand Canyon Lodge. Please refer to the North Rim Pocket Map for more details.

Arizona Trail

The Arizona Trail segment on the North Rim provides great mountain biking opportunities. The trail traverses 12.1 miles (19.5 km) of forest inside the park. The trail continues north of the park boundary in the Kaibab National Forest.

You can access the Arizona Trail on the North Rim from the North Kaibab Trailhead parking lot. The trailhead is at the south end of the parking lot.
Before embarking on this easy to moderate trail, please review important information at the following web site - https://aztrail.org/explore/passages/passage-39-grand-canyon-north-rim/

Riding to Point Imperial or Cape Royal

Riding along the Point Imperial or Cape Royal roads is not recommended and is extremely hazardous. Both access roads are narrow, have minimal shoulders, and have numerous sharp corners, which can lead to blind spots for both drivers and cyclists. Vegetation along the roads also minimizes line of sight for all road users. There are other cycling opportunities along the North Rim, as outlined above.
 
 
a bicyclist wearing a helmet is starting down a dirt road on the edge of a forest.
The Arizona Trail segment on the North Rim provides great mountain biking opportunities.
 

Rules of the Road/Safety

Cycling is a great way to experience the North Rim; however, please remember the following rules and guidelines:

Cyclists…
  • Are subject to the same traffic rules as automobiles & share the road with vehicles
  • Should use extreme caution when riding on park roads - shoulders are narrow & vehicle traffic is heavy
  • Should ride single file with the flow of traffic - there are no designated cycling lanes
  • Must wear a helmet
  • Should see and be seen - wear bright colors
  • Must yield to pedestrians & let them know you are approaching from behind with a bell or calm voice
  • Should bring sufficient water and snacks
  • Should acclimatize – the average elevation on the North Rim is 8,000 feet (2,438 m)
  • Be prepared for possible weather changes
Bicycles are prohibited below the rim/in the canyon.
 

Camping

Traveling to the North Rim via bicycle?

Bicyclist campsites are available at the North Rim Campground on a first-come, first-serve basis. Bicycle/backpacker sites are $6.00 per person, per night.

NO cars are allowed.

Last updated: June 15, 2019

Contact the Park

Mailing Address:

PO Box 129
Grand Canyon, AZ 86023

Phone:

928-638-7888

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