Changing Landscape

Hunt House Information Center and barn as viewed from the towpath trail on a fall day with autumn foliage falling on the grass.
The Hunt House in Everett now serves as the Hunt House Visitor Information Center.

© Jeffrey Gibson

 

The landscape of the Cuyahoga Valley has witnessed centuries of changes as farmers struggled to use the land to feed and support their families. Over time agriculture intensified, technology advanced, and properties exchanged owners.

Later generations of landowners were sometimes members of the same family and sometimes not. Some new owners continued to plow the land, while others pursued different goals. During the establishment of Cuyahoga Valley National Park from the mid-1970s through the mid-1980s, the federal government purchased many properties. The park brought new hopes for preservation, but also new challenges related to increasing tourism and shrinking local tax bases. The Cuyahoga Valley is a dynamic landscape, continuously adapting to new cultural influences.

 

In Their Own Words

Hear stories about Cuyahoga Valley life below.

 
 
 

Past and present residents have witnessed natural and cultural changes that impacted their decisions to live and farm in the Cuyahoga Valley. From the first stages of national park development, local residents expressed concerns about what would happen to their properties, neighborhoods, and way of life.

 

Learn More

Explore the links below to learn more about some of Cuyahoga Valley National Park's historic farms, and hear stories from residents who experienced many of these changes.

Last updated: December 20, 2021

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Contact Info

Mailing Address:

15610 Vaughn Road
Brecksville , OH 44141

Phone:

440 717-3890

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