Artistry of Nature

On March 1, 1872, Yellowstone became the first national park for all to enjoy the unique hydrothermal and geologic wonders. Theses wonders were captured a year earlier in the art of William Henry Jackson’s photographs, Thomas Moran’s paintings, and Henry Elliot’s sketches during the 1871 Hayden Expedition. Their work inspired Congress to preserve the area.

 
A dark blue hot spring with a white crested edge rimmed by orange water.

Life in Extreme Heat

Hydrothermal features are habitats for microscopic organisms called thermophiles: "thermo" for heat, "phile" for lover.

Thomas Moran painting titled

Thomas Moran's Diary

Experience 1870s Yellowstone through an artist's eyes.

 

Experience Your Yellowstone

An amazing experience awaits you here. In October, operations and opportunities will be limited, so please check the current conditions, operating seasons and hours, road conditions, and lodging and eating options to help plan your visit as best as possible.

 
A lone person standing on a boardwalk and takes a picture of steaming hot springs.

Things To Do

Explore all the different things there are to do in the park.

Yellowstone's app running on a tablet

Digital Guide to Yellowstone

Geyser predictions, interactive maps, self-guided tours, current conditions, and more. Download the official, free app today!

View from the top of a building shows visitors standing in a wide arc around a steaming geyser.

Webcams

Watch Old Faithful erupt or see the Upper Geyser Basin, Mount Washburn, Yellowstone Lake, and some of the park entrances.

A car drives along on a winding road during a foggy morning.

Park Roads

Check the status of park roads.

A person looks through a camera with a large zoom lens at a bear in the distance

Watch Wildlife

Bring binoculars or a spotting scope and enjoy watching animals from a safe distance.

Child wearing a winter hat and coat looking out across a deep, aqua-green hot spring.

Kids & Youth

What fascinates you about Yellowstone? Personalize your online adventure of the world's first national park.

Map of Norris Geyser Basin showing a brief description and image of Steamboat Geyser.

Virtual Tours

Virtual explore different parks of the park through interactive maps.

 

Understand Yellowstone

Yellowstone is as wondrous as it is complex. The park is at the heart of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, where nature and culture abound. Here are just a few highlights for you to learn about the park.

 
A bull elk bugling

Nature

Discover the natural wonder of Yellowstone, from the geology beneath the plant communities to the animals migrating through the ecosystem.

A large dark bird stands over the remains of a carcass on a snowbank next to a body of water.

Golden Eagle

Golden eagles are named for the yellow feathers at the base of the neck.

A male cougar stares down from a tree.

Cougar

Largest of the cat species in Yellowstone.

Lower Falls during winter

Grand Canyon Of The Yellowstone River

Virtually explore the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone River and learn more about this natural treasure

A bat rests on some wooden posts.

Bats

Bats are the only mammals capable of sustained, flapping flight. Yellowstone has 13 species of bats in the park.

A heartbeat graphic is superimposed over a croaking frog and a mountain valley

Yellowstone Science

Yellowstone Science shares in-depth, science-based knowledge about the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem.

 

Preserve Yellowstone

The National Park Service works to preserve Yellowstone for the enjoyment, education, and inspiration of all people. We are not alone in this endeavor-park partners, volunteers, and visitors all help. Learn how to get involved.

 
Park carpenters working on cabinets and shelving.

Work With Us

Search for jobs with the National Park Service or companies that operate in the park.

Photo of ranger deploying bear spray.

Bear Spray

Learn about this highly effective bear deterrent.

Photo of a park employee cleaning a boat with a power washer.

Clean, Drain, and Dry

Protect park waters by preventing the spread of aquatic invasive species.

Contact the Park

Mailing Address:

PO Box 168
Yellowstone National Park, WY 82190-0168

Phone:

307-344-7381

Contact Us