A large van travels over the snow in a blizzard

Most Park Roads Closed to Autos

All roads except the road from the North Entrance to the Northeast Entrance are closed to automobiles.

 

Jewel-like Pools Upon the Landscape

On March 1, 1872, Yellowstone became the first national park for all to enjoy the unique hydrothermal and geologic wonders. In the depths of winter, the hot springs of Yellowstone appear as colorful jewels amongst the snow.

 
A deep, blue and green hot spring.

Hydrothermal Features

Learn about hot springs, geysers, mudpots, and fumaroles.

Visitors on a boardwalk gaze out at orange and white colored travertine terraces.

Mammoth Hot Springs

Virtually wander around Mammoth Hot Springs, where the underlying limestone allow large terraces to form above ground.

The rainbow colors of Grand Prismatic Spring range from blue to orange.

Hydrothermal Systems

Yellowstone's hydrothermal systems are the visible expression of the immense Yellowstone volcano.

 

Experience Your Yellowstone

An amazing experience awaits you here. In November, most of the park's roads and services are closed, so please check the current conditions, operating seasons and hours, road conditions, and lodging and eating options to help plan your visit as best as possible.

 
Snowmobiles and a snowcoach ride by a small group of bison

Ride a Snowmobile or Snowcoach

Take a guided tour of wintry Yellowstone.

View from the top of a building shows visitors standing in a wide arc around a steaming geyser.

Webcams

Watch Old Faithful erupt or see the Upper Geyser Basin, Mount Washburn, Yellowstone Lake, and some of the park entrances.

A lone person standing on a boardwalk and takes a picture of steaming hot springs.

Things To Do

Explore all the different things there are to do in the park.

Snow blankets rolling hills and conifer trees grow along the ridges.

Play in the Snow

Winter is a magical time to explore Yellowstone by skis, snowshoes, snowmobile, or snowcoach.

A skier enjoys a winter sunrise at near a steaming geyser.

Explore in Winter

Ready to brave the cold? Check out this information for planning a winter visit.

Child wearing a winter hat and coat looking out across a deep, aqua-green hot spring.

Kids & Youth

What fascinates you about Yellowstone? Personalize your online adventure of the world's first national park.

Map of Norris Geyser Basin showing a brief description and image of Steamboat Geyser.

Virtual Tours

Virtual explore different parks of the park through interactive maps.

 

Understand Yellowstone

Yellowstone is as wondrous as it is complex. The park is at the heart of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, where nature and culture abound. Here are just a few highlights for you to learn about the park.

 
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Elk are the most abundant large mammal found in Yellowstone and are an important species within the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem.

 
Orange-colered bacterial column growing in geyser runoff water.

Thermophilic Communities

Thermophilic communities are very diverse, depending on the microbes living there, the pH, and the water temperature.

A group of rangers with text saying

Kids: Ask a Ranger

Check out some of the popular questions that visitors ask Yellowstone rangers. Maybe you will learn some cool facts about Yellowstone.

A historical photo of Calvary officers practicing with a canyon.

Historic Mammoth

Learn about Mammoth Hot Springs' historical district including the Roosevelt Arch.

Bison walk single-file on a path through snow.

Winter Ecology

Winter in Yellowstone is a place of magic and vulnerability.

A large, gray owl sits on a branch of a conifer tree.

Get Wild: Yellowstone Survivor

Ready to see how you compare to some of the wildlife in Yellowstone? Check out these fun activities.

A heartbeat graphic is superimposed over a croaking frog and a mountain valley

Yellowstone Science

Yellowstone Science shares in-depth, science-based knowledge about the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem.

 

Preserve Yellowstone

The National Park Service works to preserve Yellowstone for the enjoyment, education, and inspiration of all people. We are not alone in this endeavor-park partners, volunteers, and visitors all help. Learn how to get involved.

 
A group of bison cows and calves walking through a green meadow.

Bison Management

Review how the park maintains a wild, migratory bison population in a modern landscape.

People posing alongside an historic yellow park bus.

Partners

Learn how partners help support efforts to preserve and protect the park's spectacular natural and cultural features.

Snowmobilers stop to take photos of Electric Peak at a Swan Lake Flats pull-out.

Winter Use Management

The final Rule authorizing oversnow-vehicle use in Yellowstone was published in the Federal Register on October 23, 2013.

Last updated: January 7, 2021

Contact the Park

Mailing Address:

PO Box 168
Yellowstone National Park, WY 82190-0168

Phone:

307-344-7381

Contact Us