Soul of Wilderness

On March 1, 1872, Yellowstone became the first national park for all to enjoy the unique hydrothermal wonders. One hundred years later, in 1972, 90% of Yellowstone was recommended for federal wilderness designation. There are many opportunities for visitors to experience wilderness throughout the park.

 
 
A waterfall drops over a gray rock cliff and a rainbow glows in the spray.

Wilderness

More than 2 million acres of Yellowstone are recommended for federal wilderness designation and managed as such.

Four people sitting in campsite in front of a fire laughing and smiling.

Camp in a Campground

Plan a night in one of twelve park campgrounds.

Steep mountains are reflected in the clear waters of a stream.

Clean and Healthy Again!

Join us July 18 to celebrate the restoration of Soda Butte Creek.

 

Visit Yellowstone

An amazing experience awaits you here. Yellowstone is a seasonal park, so plan your visit by learning about the current conditions, operating seasons and hours, road conditions, lodging and eating options, and available activities.

 
People walk along a boardwalk that goes through the a bare landscape covered in parts by water.

Things To Do

Explore all the different things there are to do in the park.

Old Faithful Geyser

Webcams

Watch Old Faithful erupt or see the Upper Geyser Basin, Mount Washburn, Yellowstone Lake, and some of the park entrances.

People hiking through a meadow of yellow flowers.

Take the Yellowstone Pledge

Take the pledge. Tell a friend. Protect the park.

Lightning strikes Electric Peak as a dark storm rolls over the mountain.

Backcountry Situation Report

Current conditions for trails and campsites.

Yellowstone's app running on a tablet

Digital Guide to Yellowstone

Geyser predictions, interactive maps, self-guided tours, current conditions, and more. Download the official, free app today!

 

Understand Yellowstone

Yellowstone is as wondrous as it is complex. The park is at the heart of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, where nature and culture abound. Here are just a few highlights for you to learn about the park.

 
Night view of Milky Way and Castle Geyser

Dark Skies

Learn about dark skies, and the importance of darkness to humans and wildlife.

A smoke plume rises into a blue sky across a wide landscape

Air Quality

Yellowstone is a Class I airshed. The largest source of particulate matter in Greater Yellowstone is smoke from wildland fire.

Three Nez Perce on horseback.

Native American Affairs

Many tribes have a traditional connection to the land and resources of Yellowstone.

An underwater view of a spotted fish with a red slash on its neck and side swims above pebbles

Fish and Aquatic Species

Native fish underpin natural food webs and have great local economic significance.

Pink wildflowers in bloom.

Wildflowers

Wildflowers can grow under the forest canopy, but the most conspicuous displays occur in open meadows and sagebrush-steppe.

 

Preserve Yellowstone

The National Park Service works to preserve Yellowstone for the enjoyment, education, and inspiration of all people. We are not alone in this endeavor-park partners, volunteers, and visitors all help. Learn how to get involved.

 
A wildfire crew stands closely by a large pile of burning logs.

Fire Management

Balancing the benefits and threats of fire.

Photo of ranger deploying bear spray.

Bear Spray

Read about this highly effective bear deterrent.

Photo of a park employee cleaning a boat with a power washer.

Clean, Drain, and Dry

Protect park waters by preventing the spread of aquatic invasive species.

Last updated: July 1, 2019

Contact the Park

Mailing Address:

PO Box 168
Yellowstone National Park, WY 82190-0168

Phone:

307-344-7381

Contact Us