Land of Elk

On March 1, 1872, Yellowstone became the first national park for all to enjoy the unique hydrothermal and geologic wonders. From early September to mid-October, a new energy emerges in Yellowstone as bull elk bugle and battle each other during the fall mating season.

 
A bull elk with large antlers bugles in front of yellow leaves

Elk

Elk are the most abundant large mammal found in Yellowstone.

A group of photographers near Mammoth Hot Springs

Take Photographs

Best practices and tips for safely capturing that perfect photograph in Yellowstone.

 

Experience Your Yellowstone

An amazing experience awaits you here. This summer, operations and opportunities will be limited, so please check the current conditions, operating seasons and hours, road conditions, and lodging and eating options to help plan your visit as best as possible.

 
A lone person standing on a boardwalk and takes a picture of steaming hot springs.

Things To Do

Explore all the different things there are to do in the park.

Yellowstone's app running on a tablet

Digital Guide to Yellowstone

Geyser predictions, interactive maps, self-guided tours, current conditions, and more. Download the official, free app today!

View from the top of a building shows visitors standing in a wide arc around a steaming geyser.

Webcams

Watch Old Faithful erupt or see the Upper Geyser Basin, Mount Washburn, Yellowstone Lake, and some of the park entrances.

A car drives along on a winding road during a foggy morning.

Park Roads

Check the status of park roads.

A person looks through a camera with a large zoom lens at a bear in the distance

Watch Wildlife

Bring binoculars or a spotting scope and enjoy watching animals from a safe distance.

Child wearing a winter hat and coat looking out across a deep, aqua-green hot spring.

Kids & Youth

What fascinates you about Yellowstone? Personalize your online adventure of the world's first national park.

Map of Norris Geyser Basin showing a brief description and image of Steamboat Geyser.

Virtual Tours

Virtual explore different parks of the park through interactive maps.

 

Understand Yellowstone

Yellowstone is as wondrous as it is complex. The park is at the heart of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, where nature and culture abound. Here are just a few highlights for you to learn about the park.

 
A family seen sitting in the shelter.

The Tukudika Indians

The Tukudika, or Sheep Eater, Indians were a band of Mountain Shoshone that lived for thousands of years in the area.

The head of a brown spotted snake among grass

Reptiles

There are six reptile species in Yellowstone.

Historic photograph of Fort Yellowstone showing the red-roofed buildings of Officer's Row.

Fort Yellowstone

Explore this historic US Army post built during the park's early years.

A pine cone laying on the ground

Fire Ecology in Yellowstone

Did you know fires are a natural part of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem? Some species have adapted to fire, or even depend on it

A peregrine falcon perched on a branch.

Peregrine Falcon

Peregrine falcons are some of the fastest birds.

A heartbeat graphic is superimposed over a croaking frog and a mountain valley

Yellowstone Science

Yellowstone Science shares in-depth, science-based knowledge about the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem.

 

Preserve Yellowstone

The National Park Service works to preserve Yellowstone for the enjoyment, education, and inspiration of all people. We are not alone in this endeavor-park partners, volunteers, and visitors all help. Learn how to get involved.

 
A wildfire crew stands closely by a large pile of burning logs.

Fire Management

Balancing the benefits and threats of fire.

Photo of ranger deploying bear spray.

Bear Spray

Learn about this highly effective bear deterrent.

Photo of a park employee cleaning a boat with a power washer.

Clean, Drain, and Dry

Protect park waters by preventing the spread of aquatic invasive species.

Last updated: September 1, 2020

Contact the Park

Mailing Address:

PO Box 168
Yellowstone National Park, WY 82190-0168

Phone:

307-344-7381

Contact Us