Sister Parks

A large cave room with a person standing in the middle
The Murmuring Cave, Škocjan Caves Regional Park, Slovenia

Photo from Nature Parks of Slovenia

Mammoth Cave National Park, with its long history of karst and cave research, has attracted scientists from around the world to study the cave and its surroundings. Sharing research conducted at the park and learning from other scientists around the world illuminates concerns that parks and preserves face worldwide.

Fostering Collaboration

Caves and limestone landscapes are found globally and face common threats such as:

  • contamination of groundwater
  • overdevelopment near protected areas

Mammoth Cave National Park has developed sister park relationships to exchange research and best management practices for the preservation of cave resources and the development of sustainable human communities within karst landscapes.

 

Sister Park Initiative

Learn more about the Sister Parks program and guidelines.

NPS Office of International Affairs
 
Large stone pinnacles
Shilin Stone Forest National Park, China

Photo from Shilin Forest Geopark

Mammoth Cave’s Sister Parks and Partners

Shilin Stone Forest National Park, China

Shilin Stone Forest National Park, part of the South China Karst World Heritage Site, is known for its aboveground limestone “forests.” Chinese park managers share challenges of protecting karst landscapes and balancing robust tourism. This World Heritage Site is Mammoth Cave National Park’s first sister park.

Škocjan Caves Regional Park, Slovenia

Škocjan Caves Regional Park was designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1986 and became an International Biosphere Reserve in 2004. The park protects the unique karst landscape and rich archeological resources dating to early prehistoric times.

 
 
A boat entering a cave from a large body of water
Puerto Princesa Subterranean River National Park, the Philippines

Photo from UNESCO

Puerto Princesa Subterranean River National Park, the Philippines

Puerto Princesa Subterranean River National Park, part of the Palawan International Biosphere Reserve (1990), was listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1999. The park is known for its limestone mountain landscape and underground river system. In 2018, Mammoth Cave National Park began a formal partnership with Puerto Princesa Subterranean River National Park and the Crawford Hydrology Laboratory of Western Kentucky University to foster the scientific collaboration and understanding of karst landscapes.

Last updated: January 4, 2022

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Contact Info

Mailing Address:

P.O. Box 7
Mammoth Cave , KY 42259-0007

Phone:

270 758-2180

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