Accessibility

a hard trail leads to a large stone arch
A barrier-free portion of the Windows Trail

NPS/Neal Herbert

 

Learn and Explore

Arhes National Park is a red-rock wonderland. You can explore much of the park and see many famous arches and rock formations via the paved scenic road. Some short accessible trails and viewpoints provide a closer view of the park. Longer trails lead to more arches and notable rock formations.

US citizens or permanent residents with permanent disabilities qualify for the Interagency Access Pass, which provides free or discounted admission to over 2,000 federal recreation sites.

The information about specific facilities and services provided below may help you better plan your visit. If a particular service or issue is not mentioned below please contact the park.

 
 
 

Blind/Low Vision Accessibility

Visitor center exhibits include audio recordings and tactile models and maps, and rock samples. At the bookstore, you can purchase or rent an audio tour of the park's scenic road. There are no recorded descriptions of exhibits or waysides. We have audio versions of our park brochure on CD at the visitor center, or you can listen to it below. You may also request large-print and braille publications at the visitor center.

You can also download screenreader-compatible brochures and guides on our publications page.

Audio Brochure

Download or listen to an audio version of the park brochure.

 

Service Animals

Service animals are allowed in national parks. What is a service animal?

Service animals are welcome everywhere at Arches National Park. Owners are encouraged to identify their working service animal, such as with a vest. Identification is not required, but helps prevent unwarranted "dog on trail" complaints from other visitors. There are no plastic bags provided at trailheads for waste products, so please bring your own.

Caution! The desert can be deadly for pets and service animals. Car temperatures rise quickly in the sun, even on cool days. Your animal can easily die of heat exhaustion. If you are leaving a service animal in a car, crack the windows as much as possible and leave water to drink. You can only get water at the visitor center or Devils Garden. We recommend you not leave service animals in the car at all when the outside temperature exceeds 68 degrees, even with the windows cracked.

Last updated: August 20, 2019

Contact the Park

Mailing Address:

PO Box 907
Moab, UT 84532

Phone:

(435) 719-2299

Contact Us