• pond surrounded by green brush, reflecting a distant range of snow-covered mountains that are dominated by one massive mountain

    Denali

    National Park & Preserve Alaska

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  • Road Open to: Mile 30 (Teklanika River)

    The Denali Park Road is currently open to Mile 30, Teklanika River. If wintry conditions occur, the road may close at some point closer to the park entrance. More »

Campground Fees & Reservations

How to reserve a campground

Online reservations for campgrounds are possible through our concessionaire, Doyon/ARAMARK Joint Venture (JV).

Call 1 800 622-7275 (domestic)
Call 1 907 272-7275 (international)

Reservations for each summer season can be made as early as December 1 of the preceding year.

Read up on the seasons in Denali
 

Campgrounds in Denali

Within Denali National Park and Preserve there are six campgrounds of varying size and distance from the developed area at the entrance to the park. You may camp a total of 14 days per year in Denali's campgrounds. Site sizes vary, however, and there are a limited number of sites that may accommodate recreational vehicles (RV's) up to 40' in length.

This page is for camping in established campgrounds. Backcountry camping is described elsewhere.

Nightly fees and other information are detailed below for each campground.

 

Riley Creek
Riley Creek Campground is a 147 site campground located just inside the entrance to the park. Reservations are made via www.reservedenali.com or 1-800-622-7275. Read a more detailed description of Riley Creek Campground.

Sites are reserved by size, identified by the letters "A," "B," and "C."
"A" sites can accommodate tents and RV's 30-40' (max) in length: $28
"B" sites can accommodate RV's/tents less than 30' in length: $22
"C" sites are walk-in, tent-only, and only available at the Wilderness Access Center on a walk-in basis. $14

Fees are waived in the winter season.

 
Savage River
Savage River Campground is a 33 site campground located at Mile 13 on the Park Road. There are several group sites available for non-commercial or pre-approved commercial use. Read a detailed description of Savage River Campground.

Sites are reserved by size, identified by the letters "A" and "B."
"A" sites can accommodate tents and RVs, 30'-40' (max) in length: $28 per night.
"B" sites can accommodate tents and RVs less than 30' in length: $22 per night.

Group sites are $40 per night.
 
Sanctuary River
Sanctuary Campground is a 7 site campground located at Mile 23 on the Park Road. It is open only to tent campers. Read a more detailed description of Sanctuary River Campground.

All sites are $9 per night, plus a one-time reservation fee of $5.

Reservations for Sanctuary can only be made on a walk-in basis at the Wilderness Access Center, no more than two days before your desired nights at this campground.
 
Teklanika River
Teklanika (Tek) River Campground is a 53 site campground located at Mile 29 on the Park Road. Tents and RVs up to 40' in length can be accommodated. Read a detailed description of Tek Campground. Special restrictions apply when camping at Teklanika River with a vehicle.

All sites are $16 per night, plus a one-time reservation fee of $5.
 
Igloo Creek Campground
Igloo Campground is a 7-site campground located at Mile 35 on the Park Road. It is open only to tent campers. Read a more detailed description of Igloo Creek Campground.

All sites are $9 per night, plus a one-time reservation fee of $5.

Reservations for Igloo can only be made on a walk-in basis at the Wilderness Access Center, no more than two (2) days before your desired nights at this campground.
 
Wonder Lake Campground
Wonder Lake is a 28 site campground located at Mile 85 on the Park Road. It is open only to tent campers. Read a more detailed description of Wonder Lake Campground.

All sites are $16 per night, plus a one-time reservation fee of $5.

Did You Know?

a lake reflecting a tree-covered hill

The vast landscapes of interior Alaska are changing. Large glaciers are receding, permafrost is melting and woody plants are spreading. Comparison of "then-and-now" photographs and data from major vegetation monitoring should allow detection, understanding and potential management of these changes.