Park Wavelengths - October 2008

 

October 31, 2008

Forwarded to Park Wavelengths

Subject: Aerial Giacomini Wetlands Photo (large File)

Another recent photo of the Giacomini Wetlands Restoration. With the rain coming, small freshwater ponds may form soon at the southern end of the property.

This photo was taken by Robert Campbell who flew over the site on Wednesday, October 29, 2008.

 
Aerial photo of flooded Giacomini Wetlands taken on October 29, 2008 © Robert Campbell
 

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October 28, 2008

Forwarded to Park Wavelengths:

Subject: Giacomini Restoration Photo (Large File)

This photo is from the Limantour Road new scenic vista. It shows the extent of the new Giacomini Wetlands (560 acres) at last Sunday's high tide of 5.9 feet. This area in the photo has been diked for over 60 years until October 26, 2008.

 
Photo of the flooded Giacomini Wetlands taken on October 26, 2008, from Limantour Road. Photo courtesy of Dave Dempko.
 

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October 25, 2008

Forwarded to Park Wavelengths email list:

Subject: Tree removal at Muddy Hollow next week

The hazard fuels crew led by Jon Haag will be cutting and chipping Monterey cypress on Muddy Hollow Road on either side of the intersection with Bayview Trail. They will begin on Monday, October 27. This invasive species has been spreading rapidly outward from the large historic trees since the Vision Fire.

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October 22, 2008

The new moon rises Tuesday, October 28 with high tides mid-day, 6 feet plus followed by extreme low tides after dark. The last of Orionid meteor showers are being seen in the early evening before moonrise.

It is an important time to be watchful for black tailed deer along local roads. As live oak and tanbark oak acorns ripen, deer are feeding on them for a last bit of fattening as the does become pregnant and before winter. It is the end of the rut season, where bucks may sometimes run directly into road areas following does.

The new trail at Limantour Beach to the Limantour Estero, part of the Coastal Watershed Restoration, is coming along; contractors hope to have the work completed before serious rains begin. Watch for heavy equipment and stay behind temporary fencing.

Annual tule elk counts are being completed over the next two weeks; staff on horse back will be seen along the Tomales Point Trail. Three separate counting days occur to verify a final number. The small herd relocated several years back to the Coast Camp/Muddy Hollow area is also counted; they are not seen as easily as the Tomales Point herd, typically, there are several sitings in the winter at Drakes Beach in the tule marsh and on the hillside above the beach.

The iceplant removal project at the Lighthouse has been in high gear; huge mounds of plant material are being left to decompose on site. Plans for prescribed burns along Highway 1 are being made for the week of October 27-31; these burns are to reduce exotic broom and create a fire break.

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October 22, 2008

Forwarded to Local Park Wavelengths:

Subject: Point Reyes prescribed fire update & Mesa Fire near Bolinas

POINT REYES NATIONAL SEASHORE PRESCRIBED FIRE UPDATE

Point Reyes Fire Management has postponed plans to do controlled burns along Highway 1 until next week in order to assist the East Bay Regional Parks with their prescribed fire program.

If weather conditions are favorable, burning will take place along Highway 1 on two separate days, either Tuesday, Wednesday, or Thursday, October 28-30.

Each burn is approximately 40 acres in size, about 10 to 15 miles south of Olema on the east side of Highway 1. One burn is located south of the Randall Trail; the other is north of the McCurdy Trail.

No trail closures are anticipated, however, short periods of one lane controlled traffic will be necessary due to fire equipment along the road.

MESA FIRE NEAR BOLINAS YESTERDAY AFTERNOON

Firefighters from Bolinas Fire Protection District, Stinson Beach Fire Protection District, and Marin County Fire Department, responded to a wildfire on U.S. Coast Guard property off Mesa Road near Bolinas yesterday afternoon, Tuesday, October 28.

The fire was suppressed at approximately 3 acres and did not burn onto Point Reyes National Seashore which surrounds the Coast Guard's land. The fire was reported at 3:15pm and was under control within 20 minutes.

Marin County Fire Department is investigating the cause of the fire, which appears to be related to the antenna system at the Coast Guard site.

###

Jennifer Chapman
Fire Communication and Education Specialist
S.F. Bay Area National Parks
415-464-5133 TEL
415-663-8132 FAX

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October 18, 2008

Forwarded to Park Wavelengths Subscribers:

Subject: Point Reyes prescribed fire update

PRESCRIBED FIRE UPDATE

Fire management burning was postponed this week (October 13-17) at Point Reyes National Seashore.

This was partly due to the need for local agencies to focus on the Angel Island fire.

A 40-acre burn is tentatively scheduled for next Thursday, October 23.

This burn is on the east side of Highway 1, approximately 10 miles south of Olema, and south of the Randall Trail.

Burning is expected to be completed between the hours of 10AM and 4PM.

See also press release below from Marin County Fire Department.

###

Jennifer Chapman
Fire Communication and Education Specialist
S.F. Bay Area National Parks
415-464-5133 TEL
415-663-8132 FAX

----- Forwarded by Jennifer Chapman on 10/17/2008 08:24 AM ----- *****************************************************
Marin County Fire Department News Release
*****************************************************

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

October 16, 2008 8 AM

Wildfire on Angel Island State Park - Natural Causes Ruled Out

Angel Island State Park, California . Fire investigators have determined that the cause of the wildfire on Angel Island State Park was “human” in nature. The investigation will continue to identify the specific cause of the blaze.

A total of 380 acres were scorched in the Park after the fire erupted Sunday evening just before 9 PM. Firefighters worked tirelessly through the night to protect dozens of historic buildings. Several firefighters will remain on the island to assist with the rehabilitation of the burned areas and continue mop-up operations. PG&E has restored power to the island.

Angel Island State Park is currently closed to the public. The Park will re-open on a limited basis Monday October 20 th. The areas above Perimeter Road, which includes all campsites, will remain closed until further notice. Additional information about the Park can be obtained by calling 415-435-5390.

Media Contact: For more information contact: Mike Giannini, Information Officer, Marin County Fire Department (415) 518-1523.

###

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October 14, 2008

Contractors will be closing the road to the Lighthouse and South Beach this Thursday, October 16th and this Friday, October 17th for paving and sealing. They had hoped to complete the work on the regular Tuesday/Wednesday closed days but could not. We regret any inconvenience.

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October 9, 2008

What’s Happening at the Giacomini Wetlands This Week (Week of October 6 – October 11, 2008):

Come help us celebrate this incredible legacy project for Tomales Bay as we finally breach the levees and let in the tides!

  • Breach Celebration: The weekend of October 25-26 will be a weekend of celebration. Join us for a talk on Saturday, October 25, by noted wildlife biologist Jules Evens on the dynamics and changes in bird use in the Giacomini Ranch prior to and after restoration. On Sunday, October 26, the Dairy Mesa will be opened for viewing of the high tides as they flood the ranch for one of the first times in more than 60 years. Visitors can walk out with Park and PRNSA staff to view the high tide at its peak in one of the newly created tidal channels off Lagunitas Creek. All of this will be followed by an open house event at the Seashore’s Red Barn in the early afternoon. See our Phase II Construction Updates page for more details.


  • Saturday Construction: As the project gets closer to wetland construction deadlines and the final breach event on October 25, 2008, the contractor will be working Saturdays to ensure that all work within areas that will soon become tidal is completed. On Saturday, October 11, most of the work in the West Pasture near Inverness Park will be completed, with the exception of the removal of the Fish Hatchery Creek tidegate/culverts. There will also be some construction activities in the East Pasture near Point Reyes Station. Construction will not start until 8:30 p.m. and will end at 6 p.m. on Saturdays, with the exception of the day when the final levee breaches will occur. On Saturday, October 25, construction will continue past 6 p.m. as the contractor works hard to remove all the final portions of the remaining sections of levee during the low tide. The Seashore and PRNSA appreciate the patience and understanding of the local community as we push forward with completion of the second and largest phase of restoration.


  • Hauling and Disposal of Sediment: Hauling from the East Pasture is expected to begin October 14 and run for two to three weeks. Hauling is being conducted with biodiesel-fueled trucks. Most of the East Pasture levee material has been used to fill drainage ditches and construct high tide refugia, with the rest being placed at the Dairy Mesa to restore the natural topography of the Mesa.


  • Come Be Part of the Restoration Process: Just because the levees are breached doesn’t mean that all the restoration work is completed. The Park will be continuing restoration through revegetating some of the restored areas, and we hope that you will become involved through either attending an open community planting date or scheduling a planting day for your group or organization. We also welcome school groups. Check our website in mid-October for open community planting dates schedule, and contact Lorraine Parsons by email if you are interested in scheduling a group or organization planting day or Leslie Adler-Ivanbrook by email for school group planting days.


  • Olema Marsh Restoration: Construction in Olema Marsh has been pushed back to October 14, 2008. On or around this time, the contractor will breach a portion of a small berm that limits hydrologic connectivity of Bear Valley Creek with Lagunitas Creek and shallowly excavate in the marsh to improve water flow conveyance. Bear Valley Creek flows into Olema Marsh, which is severely impounded due to loss of outflow through one culvert and the presence of an earthen berm near the inlet of the remaining culvert. No material will be off-hauled from Olema Marsh. This restoration component will require temporary closure of the Olema Marsh Trail on or around October 14th for approximately one 5- to 7 days.


  • East Pasture – Construction Moves South: The contractor has finished clearing areas and will begin work Friday, October 10, on several restoration and public access components in the southern portion of the East Pasture, including 1) creation of a bench or terrace on the southwestern portion of the Lagunitas Creek bank, 2) further lowering of elevations in the former levee area, 3) removal of riprap and stabilization of creek banks near the Green Bridge County park, 4) grading to create drainage swales in the pasture; and 5) realignment of the Lagunitas Creek Trail 100 feet away from the creek to improve to provide a buffer that complies with local streamside ordinances. These activities have required temporary closure of the Lagunitas Creek Trail (formerly known as the Levee Trail) effective Monday, September 29, until construction is completed, because of the safety hazards associated with construction and construction equipment. The temporary closure is anticipated to last into early to mid-November. The contractor, the Seashore, and PRNSA request that the public respect the temporary closure of this trail and not walk or ride beyond the orange construction fencing into the work area.


  • West Pasture North Levee Removal: The contractor has finished removing almost all of the North Levee of the West Pasture and has filled the borrow ditch north of the levee. The contractor is currently working on finishing the high tide refugia area along Lagunitas Creek and will also be constructing the new tidal channel in the West Pasture, which will connect to one of the natural tidal channels in the undiked marsh north of the Giacomini Ranch. Removal of the Fish Hatchery Creek tidegates and culverts and stabilization of the western creek bank will occur during the following weeks. Construction and equipment activity on the North Levee required permanent closure of the informal path in this area, effective September 15, as the trail will be used for construction access and removed as part of the final levee removal.


  • Tidal Channel Creation and Realignment of Tomasini Creek: Construction contractors are finishing creation of tidal channels and sloughs and high tide refugia for rails in the northern and central portions of the East Pasture. In addition, contractors will be completing connection of the currently leveed section of Tomasini Creek to the new upper Tomasini Slough. The Tomasini Slough will be the new alignment for the currently leveed portion of Tomasini Creek within the Giacomini Ranch. In areas where the existing channel will be retained as part of the Tomasini Slough alignment, the contractor has removed vegetative material in the channel to improve hydraulic capacity.


  • Levee Removal: All of the levees have been removed in the East Pasture, and the central and southernmost portions of West Pasture levees have been removed. Final removal of levees in the West Pasture started last week (see West Pasture Starts North Levee Removal). At some of the southernmost areas, levees have been completely removed, but in the middle and northern portions of the ranch, a small amount of outer levee material is being retained as a berm to maintain dry working conditions through October 25.


  • Invasives Removal: Contractors are almost complete with this year’s removal of invasive Himalayan blackberry from selected areas in the East Pasture. Other invasive plants that will be targeted include cape ivy, English ivy, pampas grass, periwinkle, and Eucalyptus.

A separate contractor removed a large portion of the non-native Eucalyptus trees on the Giacomini Ranch property near the Martinelli Ranch, which is part of Golden Gate National Recreation Area. Thanks to a donation by a local member of the Point Reyes community, more than 60 medium- and large-sized Eucalyptus trees were felled and, when possible, chipped and evenly redistributed within the work area. Smaller-diameter trees were cut by Park Service staff. In November, erosion control blanket and other soil stabilization measures will be installed to minimize surface run-off of soils during the rainy season.

  • Reestablishing Native Plant Communities: Revegetation contractors started this week to install container plants at some of the areas targeted for active revegetation, with early efforts focused on the high tide refugia established at the northern ends of the East and West Pastures. Additional areas at the southern end of the East Pasture will also be actively revegetated with riparian and upland plant species following completion of construction in November.


  • On Saturday, October 25, Point Reyes National Seashore Association (PRNSA) and the Seashore will be hosting the third of four field seminars on the Giacomini Wetland Restoration Project. The seminar on October 25 will focus on dynamics of bird use prior to and after restoration of the Giacomini Wetlands. The presentation will be led by Jules Evens, a noted avian biologist who has studied the birds and other wildlife in this area for decades and who has worked on the project. At 9:45 a.m., there will be an update on status of the Giacomini construction project. The field seminar will be followed by the public event on Sunday, October 26, commemorating the final breaching of the levees. All of the seminars are open to the public at no cost. The workshops and seminars will meet at 10 a.m. at the corner of 5th and C Streets in Point Reyes Station.

Other Field Seminar Topics include:

  • Saturday, November 22: Changing flow patterns and fish use in the Giacomini Restoration Area (Brannon Ketcham, Hydrologist/Water Resources Chief; Michael Reichmuth, Fisheries Biologist, Seashore).

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October 8, 2008

Forwarded to Local Park Wavelengths list

Subject: More Controlled Burning in Olema Valley Over Next 2 Weeks

Point Reyes National Seashore
Fire Management News

October 7, 2008
For Immediate Release
Jennifer Chapman 415-464-5133

More Controlled Burning in Olema Valley Over Next 2 Weeks

Fire Management staff at Point Reyes National Seashore may conduct 2 additional small burns along Highway One sometime during the week of October 13 or the week of October 20 if weather conditions allow. The burn locations are both on the east side of Highway One — one is south of the Randall Trail, and the other is north of the McCurdy Trail. The burns are each approximately 40 acres in size and are part of the Highway One Fuelbreak. This fuelbreak aims to reduce the invasive French broom population and maintain open grasslands in between large areas of dense forest on Bolinas Ridge and Inverness Ridge where a wildfire would be very difficult to control. The target burn rotation for the Highway One fuelbreak is every other year. Fuel reduction along Highway One will strengthen the road as a line of defense if there is a wildfire, which will help to protect surrounding communities and park structures.

To receive an email when the burn day is confirmed, contact the park at 415-464-5133 or by email.

-NPS-

Jennifer Chapman
Fire Communication and Education Specialist
S.F. Bay Area National Parks
415-464-5133 TEL
415-663-8132 FAX

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October 8, 2008

Forwarded to local Park Wavelengths list

Subject: FILM NOTICE: 10/9/08 and 10/10/08 Two Last Minute Film Projects In the Park

One film company confirmed on Monday afternoon that they would like to film a car commercial on Friday 10/10 from approximately 12:00 PM to 7:00 PM. There will be a crew of approximately 45 and several large vehicles. Shooting locations include Chimney Rock Road, NDOC Driveway, Sir Francis Drake and Pierce Point Road. Potential staging locations include the South Beach Parking Lot, Ottinger Hill, L Ranch Road and part of Abbotts Lagoon Parking Area. There will be a NPS Ranger Monitor and CHP will conduct traffic control.

A second film project involves a simple crew of two with a camera and tripod taking scenic footage at the Point Reyes Lighthouse on Thursday 10/9.

Permits will be emailed when complete.

Kevin E. McKay
Special Park Uses, 415-464-5111

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October 7, 2008

The full moon rises on Wednesday, October 15th; this moon is always referred to as the Hunters Moon; an extra bit of light for hunting before winter set in. It is called 'falling leaves time' among the Nez Perce of the northwest. The moon is followed by the Orionid meteor showers (Orion the hunter), formed from the dust of the tail of Haley's Comet. They will be difficult to see this year because of a bright moon rising. Extra high tides are expected as the moon is at perigee - closest to the earth. The highest day will be Wednesday and Thursday with 6.6 foot tides mid-day.

Young elephant seals have made an early appearance at Chimney Rock; about 40 sub-adults (rowdy teenagers!) are on the beach practicing their wrestling and noisemaking skills in preparation for the winter breeding season. Typically, the larger dominant males do not arrive until December.

Humpback whale sightings off Limantour and Agate Beaches continue to delight visitors. Look for their long curved fin and tails with white underneath to distinguish them. They tend to linger around a food source, unlike gray whales who have no fin and keep moving. It has been an especially good year for fall humpback sightings, warm weather in September created lots of extra food.

Numerous warblers are resting in the trees at the Fish Docks after last weekends storm - prothonotary, black polled, yellow rumped, and palm with a Downy woodpecker in the mix. The clusters of cypress trees on the outer peninsula offer a haven to migrating birds at this time of year.

Hikers and Bikers especially on the Bolinas Ridge Trail should be watchful of the beef cattle calving season; cows are very defensive of their calves and may stare and or approach if they feel threatened. Back away and be sure not to come between a calf and cow!

Marin County Open Space rangers will leading a hike on Friday, October 17 from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. along the Bear Valley Trail. Meet at the Bear Valley Visitor Center.

All park Visitor Centers will be open on Monday, October 13, the Columbus Day Holiday.

Mark your calendars for October 26th when the Giacomini wetlands goes tidal! A hike from 5th and C Street in Point Reyes Station will begin at 10:30 a.m. to get out and see the first high tides in the restored area. At the 4th and B street Marin County fire station, local firefighters are hosting the annual pancake breakfast from 8:00 a.m. till 11:00 a.m., you can fuel up before your hike!

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October 3, 2008

Forwarded to Park Wavelengths

Mark you Calender! Come help us celebrate this incredible legacy project for Tomales Bay as we finally breach the levees and let in the tides!

  • Breach Celebration: The weekend of October 25-26 will be a weekend of celebration. Join us for a talk on Saturday, October 25, by noted wildlife biologist Jules Evens on the dynamics and changes in bird use in the Giacomini Ranch prior to and after restoration. On Sunday, October 26, the Dairy Mesa will be opened for viewing of the high tides as they flood the ranch for one of the first times in more than 60 years. Visitors can walk out with Park and PRNSA staff to view the high tide at its peak in one of the newly created tidal channels off Lagunitas Creek. All of this will be followed by an open house event at the Seashore’s Red Barn in the early afternoon. See website for more details.


  • Come Be Part of the Restoration Process: Just because the levees are breached doesn’t mean that all the restoration work is completed. The Park will be continuing restoration through revegetating some of the restored areas, and we hope that you will become involved through either attending an open community planting date or scheduling a planting day for your group or organization. We also welcome school groups. Check our website in mid-October for open community planting dates schedule, and contact Lorraine Parsons by email if you are interested in scheduling a group or organization planting day or Leslie Adler-Ivanbrook by email for school group planting days.


  • West Pasture North Levee Removal: The contractor continues to remove portions of the North Levee of the West Pasture and fill the borrow ditch north of the levee. Starting next week, the contractor will be working on finishing the high tide refugia area along Lagunitas Creek and the North Levee removal, culminating with removal of the Fish Hatchery Creek tidegates and culverts and stabilization of the western creek bank. Construction and equipment activity on the North Levee required permanent closure of the informal path in this area, effective September 15, as the trail will be used for construction access and removed as part of the final levee removal.


  • East Pasture – Construction Moves South: The contractor has begun the first of several restoration and public access components in the southern portion of the East Pasture, including 1) creation of a bench or terrace on the southwestern portion of the Lagunitas Creek bank, 2) further lowering of elevations in the former levee area, 3) removal of riprap and stabilization of creek banks near the Green Bridge County park, 4) grading to create drainage swales in the pasture; and 5) realignment of the Lagunitas Creek Trail 100 feet away from the creek to improve to provide a buffer that complies with local streamside ordinances. These activities have required temporary closure of the Lagunitas Creek Trail (formerly known as the Levee Trail) effective Monday, September 29, until construction is completed, because of the safety hazards associated with construction and construction equipment. The temporary closure is anticipated to last from 2 to 3 weeks.


  • Hauling and Disposal of Sediment: Hauling from the East Pasture is expected to begin October 14 and run for two to three weeks. Hauling is being conducted with biodiesel-fueled trucks. Most of the East Pasture levee material has been used to fill drainage ditches and construct high tide refugia, with the rest being placed at the Dairy Mesa to restore the natural topography of the Mesa.


  • Olema Marsh Restoration: On October 6th, the contractor will breach a portion of a small berm that limits hydrologic connectivity of Bear Valley Creek with Lagunitas Creek. Bear Valley Creek flows into Olema Marsh, which is severely impounded due to loss of outflow through one culvert and the presence of an earthen berm near the inlet of the remaining culvert. No material will be off-hauled from Olema Marsh. This restoration component will require temporary closure of the Olema Marsh Trail effective approximately October 6th.


  • Levee Removal: All of the levees have been removed in the East Pasture, and the central and southernmost portions of West Pasture levees have been removed. Final removal of levees in the West Pasture started last week (see West Pasture Starts North Levee Removal). At some of the southernmost areas, levees have been completely removed, but in the middle and northern portions of the ranch, a small amount of outer levee material is being retained as a berm to maintain dry working conditions through October 25.


  • Reestablishing Native Plant Communities: Revegetation contractors started this week to install container plants at some of the areas targeted for active revegetation, with early efforts focused on the high tide refugia established at the northern ends of the East and West Pastures. Additional areas at the southern end of the East Pasture will also be actively revegetated with riparian and upland plant species following completion of construction in November. The Seashore will be organizing open community planting days, as well as scheduling specific dates for groups, organizations, and schools. Check our website in mid-October for open community planting day schedule, and contact Lorraine Parsons by email at if you are interested in scheduling a group or organization planting day or Leslie Adler-Ivanbrook by email for school group planting days.


  • On Saturday, October 25, Point Reyes National Seashore Association (PRNSA) and the Seashore will be hosting the third of four field seminars on the Giacomini Wetland Restoration Project. The seminar on October 25 will focus on dynamics of bird use prior to and after restoration of the Giacomini Wetlands. The presentation will be led by Jules Evens, a noted avian biologist who has studied the birds and other wildlife in this area for decades and who has worked on the project. At 9:45 a.m., there will be an update on status of the Giacomini construction project. The field seminar will be followed by the public event on Sunday, October 26, commemorating the final breaching of the levees. All of the seminars are open to the public at no cost. The workshops and seminars will meet at 10 a.m. at the corner of 5th and C Streets in Point Reyes Station.

Other Field Seminar Topics include:

  • Saturday, November 22: Changing flow patterns and fish use in the Giacomini Restoration Area (Brannon Ketcham, Hydrologist/Water Resources Chief; Michael Reichmuth, Fisheries Biologist, Seashore).


  • Public Event to Commemorate Final Breaching: The Park Service and PRNSA will be hosting a public event around the time at which levees will be finally breached in the East Pasture tentatively scheduled for October 26. Look for additional information in future construction updates.

Don Neubacher
Superintendent
Point Reyes National Seashore
Point Reyes Station, CA 94956

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Last updated: February 28, 2015

Contact the Park

Mailing Address:

1 Bear Valley Road
Point Reyes Station, CA 94956

Phone:

(415) 464-5100
This number will initially be answered by an automated attendant, from which one can opt to access a name directory, listen to recorded information about the park (i.e., directions to the park; visitor center hours of operation; weather forecast; fire danger information; shuttle bus system status; wildlife updates; ranger-led programs; seasonal events; etc.), or speak with a ranger. Please note that if you are calling between 4:30 pm and 10 am, park staff may not be available to answer your call.

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