• Camarasus skull in the cliff face, rafters on the Green River, McKee Springs petroglyphs

    Dinosaur

    National Monument CO,UT

Quarry Exhibit Hall

Visitors wander along the upper mezzanine at the Quarry Exhibit Hall.
Visitors wander along the upper mezzanine in the Quarry Exhibit Hall
NPS, Dan Johnson
 
Several young dinosaur enthusiasts pose in front of the Allosaurus reconstruction at the Quarry Exhibit Hall.

Several young dinosaur enthusiasts pose in front of the Allosaurus reconstruction at the Quarry Exhibit Hall.

NPS

The Quarry Exhibit Hall, located over the world-famous Carnegie Dinosaur Quarry, is open! The Quarry Exhibit Hall allows visitors to view the wall of approximately 1,500 dinosaur bones in a refurbished, comfortable space. Here, you can gaze upon the remains of numerous different species of dinosaurs including Allosaurus, Apatosaurus, Camarasaurus, Diplodicus, and Stegosaurus along with several others. Exhibits, including an 80-foot long mural, reveal the story of these animals and many others that lived in the Morrison environment during the late Jurassic. There are even several places where you can touch real 149 million year old dinosaur fossils!

Rangers are available to answer questions and occasionally present talks on different topics related to the quarry or dinosaurs throughout the day during the summer.

 

Hours of Operation
To access the Quarry Exhibit Hall, visitors must first stop at the Quarry Visitor Center located approximately ¼ mile from the exhibit hall. The visitor center features a staffed information desk, exhibits, sales area for the Intermountain Natural History Association and park film.

 
Passengers disembark from the shuttle at the Quarry Exhibit Hall.

Passengers disembark from the shuttle at the Quarry Exhibit Hall.

NPS

In Summer
To access the Quarry Exhibit Hall, visitors must first stop at the Quarry Visitor Center located approximately ¼ mile from the exhibit hall. The visitor center features a staffed information desk, exhibits, sales area for the Intermountain Natural History Association and park film.

From Saturday, May 17 through Sunday, September 7, 2014, the Quarry Exhibit Hall is open 8:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Access to the Quarry Exhibit Hall is by shuttle bus only from 9:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. If you arrive prior to 9:30 a.m., you will be allowed to drive your personal vehicle to the quarry. The access road closes to uphill traffic at 9:30 a.m. and shuttles depart from the visitor center every 15 minutes from 9:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. The last bus leaving the Quarry Exhibit Hall departs at 5:30 p.m. for the return to the visitor center.

Visitors with accessibility needs or those traveling with pets should inquire at the entrance station or information desk at the visitors center for directions on how to access the Quarry Exhibit Hall.


 

September 8, through October 19, 2014
The Quarry Exhibit Hall will be staffed 9:00 am to 5:00 pm daily. The shuttle will run on Saturdays and Sundays until September 21. On all other days you can drive directly to the building from 9:00 am to 4:45 pm, when the gate will be closed to uphill traffic.


 

October 19, 2014 through late Spring 2015
Due to both lower visitation and reduced staffing levels, access to the quarry will be by car caravans. Visitors drive their personal vehicle to the quarry, following the ranger. Rangers lead car caravans to the exhibit hall at the following times:

9:30 a.m 10:30 a.m.
11:30 a.m. 1:00 p.m.
2:00 p.m. 3:00 p.m.
4:00 p.m. (last trip for the day!)


If you arrive after the previous group has departed, you may have to wait up to 1 hour before the next departure. There is a twelve minute film, exhibits, and a bookstore in the visitor center to occupy your time while you wait. You can also take a scenic drive on the Cub Creek Road. Last caravan goes to the quarry at 4:00 p.m.


 

Discover Dinosaur's Paleontology
Want to learn more abour Dinosaurs and other paleontological resources found in the monument? Visit our paleontology pages.

Did You Know?

Picture of anthropomorphic figure holding a circular shape pecked into a rock.

Do you know the difference between a petroglyph (pictured here) and a pictograph? Petroglyphs are images pecked into rock while pictographs are painted images. Dinosaur National Monument preserves both forms of Native American rock art.