Sample Nominations

Introduction

Learning-by-example is highly effective and the National Register has shared examples of successful nomination, on a variety of topics, for many years now. This expanded offering of examples is organized by topic.

Please note that this page is a work in progress. Text and images are being revised. Additional examples will be frequently uploaded.

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Additional Documentation/Boundary Increase/Boundary Decrease

Additional documentation—for name changes, additional information, significance supplementation, etc.—or boundary changes are provided on a new registration form or continuation sheets for a property already listed in the National Register.
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Archeology Nominations

Properties may be eligible for the National Register if they have yielded, or may be likely to yield, important information. These are nominations for properties listed under Criterion D or with an area of significance of “archeology.”
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Areas of Significance

To qualify for the National Register, a property must be significant; that is, it must represent a significant part of the history, architecture, archeology, engineering, or culture of an area. These nominations present examples of different areas of significance, such as agriculture, education, and social history. Read the samples

Comparative Analysis

In preparing a nomination, it may be helpful to compare properties of the same time and place to determine whether their character and associations are unique, representative, or pivotal in illustrating the history of a community, State, or the nation.
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Criterion B

Properties may be eligible for the National Register if they are associated with the lives of persons significant in our past. These are examples of properties listed under Criterion B.
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Federal Agency Nominations

These are examples of nominations submitted by Federal agencies.
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Integrity

Integrity is the ability of a property to convey its significance. There are seven aspects of integrity—setting, location, design, materials, workmanship, and feeling—but a property does not need to present all seven aspects. Determining which of these aspects are most important to a particular property requires knowing why, where, and when the property is significant.

Remember, “integrity” is NOT “condition.” And integrity is not assessed on a sliding scale: places either retain integrity—that is, convey their significance—or they do not. Try this test: Would a person from the past recognize the property as it exists today? If so, the property retains integrity. Read the samples

Multiple Property Documentation

The Multiple Property Documentation Form is a “cover” document and not a nomination in its own right. It serves as a basis for evaluating the National Register eligibility of related properties. It may be used to nominate and register topically-related historic properties simultaneously or to establish the listing requirements for properties that may be nominated in the future.
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National Level of Significance

Properties are evaluated in a national context when they represent an aspect of the history of the United States and its territories as a whole. A property with national significance helps us understand the history of the nation by illustrating the nationwide impact of events or persons associated with the property, its architectural type or style, or information potential. Read the samples

Native American Places

These nominations provide examples of Native American properties and were submitted to the National Register by Tribal Historic Preservation Offices.
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Rural Historic Districts

A rural historic district is a geographical area that historically has been used by people, or shaped or modified by human activity, occupancy, or intervention, and that possesses a significant concentration, linkage, or continuity of areas of land use, vegetation, buildings and structures, roads and waterways, and natural features.
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Last updated: November 17, 2022