Removal of Non-native Fish Species

A photograph taken of an operating detoxification station during a chemical fish removal project. 
A photograph taken of an operating detoxification station during a chemical fish removal project. This photograph shows the water with the fish toxicant added (bright green) and it shows the water with the detoxicant added (bright purple). The detoxicant neutralizes the chemicals used to kill the fish.

National Park Service Photo

 

Good Answer!

Antimycin is a piscicide (fish pesticide) produced by molds of the genus Streptomyces. It is most often used to remove unwanted fish from catfish ponds, since catfish are largely resistant to it. The piscicide works by entering the fish’s blood stream through the gills and disrupts cellular respiration leading to death. Antimycin (fish pesticide) breaks down rapidly in a tumbling stream and has to be applied in precise amounts to be effective. Antimycin is not harmful to humans, plants, and other animals such as salamanders, crayfish, and otters found in and around the stream. Antimycin projects require extensive data collection, training, and precautionary measures to ensure its effectiveness and safety towards non-target species.

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Last updated: April 14, 2015

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