Minute Out in It

A Minute Out In It is a collection of short video series highlighting the sights and sounds in Capitol Reef National Park.


 

Desert Bighorn Sheep

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Duration:
1 minute, 5 seconds

Desert Bighorn Sheep are known for their unique hooves that allow them to climb steep, rocky cliffs quickly. They were reintroduced in the park in the 1990s.

 

Sunset

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Duration:
1 minute, 6 seconds

This time-lapsed video was taken at Sunset Point 2.7 miles (4.3 km) west of the visitor center. Visitors can enjoy spectacular views and stunning scenery throughout Capitol Reef National Park.

 

Rappelling

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Duration:
1 minute, 6 seconds

Visitors to Capitol Reef can enjoy a wide array of recreational activities including hiking, biking, horseback riding, and climbing. Think safety first! Check for recommended and restricted trails. This video taken near Chimney Rock shows a visitor rappelling 115 feet (35 m).

 

Bat Surveys

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Duration:
1 minute, 5 seconds

Watch an evening departure of about 200 Mexican free-tailed bats (Tadarida brasiliensis) from a roost in Capitol Reef. Mexican free-tails are found in the western U.S., south through Mexico, Central America and into northern South America. Mexican free-tailed bats in Capitol Reef migrate south to Central America and Mexico during the winter. These insectivorous bats have dark brown or gray colored fur, they weigh 0.4-0.5 oz (11-14 g) and their wingspan is between 12-14 in (30-35 cm). They have broad, black, forward pointing ears, wrinkled lips, and their wings are long and narrow; they are very fast flyers.

Although this roost only numbered about 200 bats, colonies of over 20,000,000 can be found elsewhere in their range!

 

Fremont River

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Duration:
1 minute, 5 seconds

The Fremont River has sustained life in the Fruita area for thousands of years. It was named after the explorer, John C. Fremont, and flows 95 miles (153 km) into the Dirty Devil River and eventually the Colorado River.

Contact the Park

Mailing Address:

HC 70, Box 15
Torrey, UT 84775

Phone:

435-425-3791

Contact Us