District of Columbia Parks

  • National Memorial

    African American Civil War Memorial

    Washington, DC

    Throughout the course of the American Civil War over 200,000 African American soldiers and sailors served to keep the United States whole and to free permanently over four million people in forced servitude. The African American Civil War Memorial honors the service and sacrifices of those individuals who played their part in helping their people and their country.

  • Park

    Anacostia

    Washington, DC

    Whether you exercise along the river trail or relax by the water, Anacostia Park is a breath of fresh air and a space to unwind amid a bustling city.

  • Capitol Hill Parks

    Washington, DC

    The Capitol Hill Parks include several park areas east of the U.S. Capitol. Included in this group are Folger, Lincoln, Stanton, and Marion Parks, the Eastern Market and Potomac Avenue Metro stations, and several smaller land parcels such as Seward Square, Twining Square, the Maryland Avenue Triangles, the Pennsylvania Avenue Medians, and 59 inner-city triangles and squares.

  • National Historic Trail

    Captain John Smith Chesapeake

    Various States, VA,MD,DE,DC,PA,NY

    Four hundred years ago Englishman John Smith and a small crew of adventurers set out in an open boat to explore the Chesapeake Bay. Between 1607 and 1609 Smith and his crew mapped nearly 3,000 miles of the Bay and rivers and documented American Indian communities. Smith’s map and journals are a remarkable record of the 17th-century Chesapeake. Come join the adventure on the Chesapeake Bay!

  • National Historic Site

    Carter G. Woodson Home

    Washington, DC

    Before Dr. Carter G. Woodson, there was very little accurate written history about the lives and experiences of Americans of African descent. Today a National Historic Site, Dr. Woodson’s home served as the headquarters for the Association for the Study of African American Life and History. Dr. Woodson established Negro History Week here in 1926, which we celebrate today as Black History Month.

  • National Historical Park

    Chesapeake & Ohio Canal

    Potomac River, DC,MD,WV

    Preserving America's early transportation history, the C&O Canal began as a dream of passage to Western wealth. Operating for nearly 100 years the canal was a lifeline for communities along the Potomac River as coal, lumber and agricultural products floated down the waterway to market. Today it endures as a pathway for discovering historical, natural and recreational treasures!

  • Chesapeake Bay

    Chesapeake Bay Watershed, DC,MD,NY,PA,VA,WV

    NPS helps you learn about and enjoy the Chesapeake Bay, the largest estuary in North America. Here, you can visit major league cities, colonial towns, farms and fishing villages. You can learn to kayak, pick crabs, go fishing, tour a lighthouse, slurp oysters, and slow down to enjoy the natural beauty of the Chesapeake. Download the Chesapeake Explorer mobile app and have it at your fingertips.

  • Chesapeake Bay Gateways and Watertrails Network

    DC,MD,NY,PA,VA,WV,DE

    The Chesapeake Bay Gateways and Watertrails Network connects you with the natural and cultural heritage of the Chesapeake Bay watershed through more than 170 exceptional parks, wildlife refuges, museums, sailing ships, historic communities, trails and more. Gateways Network partner sites and water trails are the special places where you can experience the authentic Chesapeake.

  • Civil War Defenses of Washington

    Washington, DC

    On forested hills surrounding the nation's capital are the remnants of a complex system of Civil War fortifications. Built by Union forces, these strategic buttresses transformed the young capital into one of the world's most fortified cities.

  • Constitution Gardens

    Washington, DC

    Officially established in 1965, National Mall and Memorial Parks actually protects some of the older parkland in the National Park System. Areas within this premier park provide visitors with ample opportunities to commemorate presidential legacies; honor the courage and sacrifice of war veterans; and celebrate the United States commitment to freedom and equality.

  • National Historic Site

    Ford's Theatre

    Washington, DC

    Explore Ford's Theatre NHS, discover Abraham Lincoln's life in Washington DC, the struggle for a united country, and the motivation behind Lincoln's Assassination.The National Park Service and the Ford's Theatre Society presents a variety of programs year round.

  • Fort Dupont Park

    Washington, DC

    Come out to celebrate 43 years of live music performances. Saturdays, July 18 -August 8 Gates open at 5:30 PM July 18th Clan Salsa DC and Eme & Heteru with DJ Lance Reynolds Hosted by Katea Stitt WPFW July 25th Cece Peniston featuring Wes Felton and Tamara Wellons DJ Jahsonic Hosted by Michel Wright MAJIC August 1 Cherrelle featuring Kendall Isadore and Kenny Sharpless DJ Lance Reynolds August 8

  • Memorial

    Franklin Delano Roosevelt

    Washington, DC

    "The only thing we have to fear is fear itself...." iconic words from an iconic president. Learn more about the man, his memorial and his lasting legacy to the Nation.

  • National Historic Site

    Frederick Douglass

    Washington, DC

    Walk the halls of Cedar Hill, home of the famed abolitionist Frederick Douglass. Born into slavery, Douglass escaped to spend his life fighting for justice and equality for all people. His tireless struggle, brilliant words, and inclusive vision of humanity continue to inspire and sustain people today.

  • Memorial

    George Mason

    Washington, DC

    Dedicated on April 9, 2002, honors the little known but widely felt contributions of an important founding father.

  • Memorial Parkway

    George Washington

    DC, MD, VA

    The George Washington Memorial Parkway was designed for recreational driving. It links sites that commemorate important episodes in American history and preserve habitat for local wildlife. The parkway and its associated trails provide a scenic place to play and rest in the busy Washington, DC metropolitan area.

  • National Memorial

    John Ericsson

    National Mall, DC

    During his lifetime, John Ericsson revolutionized several facets of technology. The Swedish-born engineer-inventor is best known for his work during the Civil War when he transformed naval warfare through his design of the iron-plated USS Monitor. The movements of Ericsson’s pencil across his drafting board were as crucial to victory as the movements of Lincoln’s armies across battlefields.

  • Kenilworth Park & Aquatic Gardens

    Washington, DC

    In an age old dance wind, water, and land combine here. Sparkling in the sun on a breezy day, this natural area of Anacostia Park has origins in a 1926 act of Congress to preserve the forests, water quality, and recreation value of the waterways of Washington, DC. The park reflects the policies that affect rivers and wetlands. Come, join the dance.

  • Memorial

    Korean War Veterans

    Washington, DC

    Our nation honors her sons and daughters who answered the call to defend a country they never knew and a people they never met.

  • LBJ Memorial Grove on the Potomac

    Washington, DC

    From this distance the seat of national power appears pristine across the river, so President Johnson came here often when he needed to escape from the stresses of building a Great Society. After he died, his wife chose this place for his memorial. A landscape of serpentine paths, white pines, a granite monolith, and an open meadow honors his legacy of social justice and conservation legislation.

  • Memorial

    Lincoln

    Washington, DC

    "In this temple, as in the hearts of the people for whom he saved the Union, the memory of Abraham Lincoln is enshrined forever." Beneath these words, the 16th President of the United States sits immortalized in marble as an enduring symbol of unity, strength, and wisdom.

  • National Memorial

    Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial

    Washington, DC

    A man of conscience; the freedom movement of which he was a beacon; and his message of freedom, equality, justice and love.

  • National Historic Site

    Mary McLeod Bethune Council House

    Washington, DC

    Mary McLeod Bethune achieved her greatest recognition at the Washington, DC townhouse that is now this National Historic Site. The Council House was the first headquarters of the National Council of Negro Women (NCNW) and was Bethune’s last home in Washington, DC. From here, Bethune and the NCNW spearheaded strategies and developed programs that advanced the interests of African American women.

  • Park

    Meridian Hill

    Washington, DC

    An administrative unit of Rock Creek Park, Meridian Hill Park is an urban park like no other. The formal, 12-acre site includes unique statues, the largest cascading fountain in North America, concrete aggregate architecture, a U.S. presidential memorial, and more. Designed based off of an Italian aristocrat's private residence, Meridian Hill Park is open to everyone. Come all, come one!

  • National Capital Parks-East

    Washington, DC

    Welcome to National Capital Parks-East. We invite you to journey to parks Beyond the Capital of Washington, D.C. National Capital Parks-East is 13 park sites, parkways and statuary covering more than 8,000 acres of historic, cultural, and recreational parklands from Capitol Hill to the nearby Maryland suburbs

  • National Mall

    Washington, DC

    A unique place in our Nation's Capital where history happens. Here, the nation celebrates, honors, and demonstrates its commitment to democracy.

  • National Mall & Memorial Parks

    Washington, DC

    Each year, millions of people visit the National Mall and Memorial Parks to recreate, to commemorate presidential legacies, to honor our nation's veterans, to make their voices heard, and to celebrate our nation's commitment to freedom and equality.

  • Memorial

    National World War II

    Washington, DC

    Through stone architecture and bronze sculptures, the World War II Memorial recognizes the ways Americans served, honors those who fell, and recognizes the victory they achieved to restore freedom and end tyranny around the globe.

  • Old Post Office Tower

    Washington, DC

    Built in 1899, the Old Post Office's clock tower offers panoramic views of Washington, D.C. The tower houses the Congress Bells, a Bicentennial gift from England commemorating friendship between the nations. The Tower is closed until 2016 as the entire building is currently undergoing major renovations.

  • Peirce Mill

    Washington, DC

    Peirce Mill was built in the 1820's, and operated commercially until 1897. The United States Government acquired the mill as part of Rock Creek in 1892. Peirce Mill has recently been refurbished and operates on special occasions. Peirce Mill is on the National Register of Historic Places.

  • National Historic Site

    Pennsylvania Avenue

    Washington, DC

    A street unlike any other. It is known the world over as the heart of the Nation's Capital. America's history has marched, paraded, promenaded, and protested its way along the Avenue.

  • National Scenic Trail

    Potomac Heritage

    the corridor between the Chesapeake Bay and the Allegheny Highlands, DC,MD,PA,VA

    Linking the Potomac and upper Ohio river basins, the Potomac Heritage Trail network follows the paths explored by George Washington. You can follow the same routes today—on foot, bicycle, horse and by boat—exploring contrasting landscapes between the Chesapeake Bay and the Allegheny Highlands.

  • President's Park (White House)

    Washington, DC

    Every president except George Washington has called the White House and its surrounding grounds his place of work, rest, and solitude. Recognizable the world around, the White House stands as a symbol of democracy. The White House and its park grounds serve not only as the seat of the executive branch of government of the United States of America, but also as an iconic place for civil discourse.

  • Park

    Rock Creek

    Washington, DC

    Rock Creek Park is truly a gem in our nation's capital. It offers visitors opportunity to reflect and soothe their spirits through the beauty of nature. Fresh air, majestic trees, wild animals, the ebb and flow of Rock Creek, and thousands of years of human history emanate the delicate aura of the forest. We invite you to Find Yourself in Rock Creek Park and help celebrate our 125th Anniversary.

  • National Historic Trail

    Star-Spangled Banner

    DC, MD, VA

    For three years the young United States was embroiled in the War of 1812 and the Chesapeake Bay region felt the brunt of it, choked by shipping blockades and ravaged by enemy raids. Through sites and landscapes in Virginia, the District of Columbia, and throughout Maryland, the Trail tells the stories of the events, people, and places that led to the birth of our National Anthem.

  • The Old Stone House

    Washington, DC

    As the nation's capital, Washington, DC is known primarily as a city of grand memorials to national leaders and significant events. But aren't the lives of DC's "regular" citizens and "regular" buildings significant too? The oldest building in DC, Old Stone House commemorates the daily lives of Georgetown's early residents. The house serves as a great example of Revolutionary War-era architecture.

  • Theodore Roosevelt Island

    Washington, DC

    In the 1930s landscape architects transformed Mason’s Island from neglected, overgrown farmland into Theodore Roosevelt Island, a memorial to America’s 26th president. They conceived a “real forest” designed to mimic the natural forest that once covered the island. Today miles of trails through wooded uplands and swampy bottomlands honor the legacy of a great outdoorsman and conservationist

  • Memorial

    Thomas Jefferson

    Washington, DC

    Author of the Declaration of Independence, Statesman and Visionary for the founding of a Nation.

  • Memorial

    Vietnam Veterans

    Washington, DC

    Honoring the men and women who served in the controversial Vietnam War, the Vietnam Veterans Memorial chronologically lists the names of more than 58,000 Americans who gave their lives in service to their country.

  • Washington Monument

    Washington, DC

    Built to honor George Washington, the United States' first president, the 555-foot marble obelisk towers over Washington, D.C. Tickets are required to visit the interior of the Washington Monument.

  • National Historic Trail

    Washington-Rochambeau

    MA,RI,CT,NY,NJ,PA,DE,MD,VA,DC

    By 1780, the Americans found their War for Independence at a stalemate. France had previously provided America with supplies and money, but now French ground forces were sent to help turn the tide of the War. General Rochambeau and the French Army allied with General Washington and the Continental Army, journeying hundreds of miles to a victory at Yorktown and, ultimately, the War.

  • World War II Memorial

    Washington, DC

    Through stone architecture and bronze sculptures, the World War II Memorial recognizes the ways Americans served, honors those who fell, and recognizes the victory they achieved to restore freedom and end tyranny around the globe.