Water Sources in Zion

Seep Spring
 

The desert can be an extreme and unforgiving environment. Carry enough water, one gallon per person per day, and drink it. Do not drink untreated water. Information on the flow of natural springs, based on the best available data, is posted in the Zion Canyon Visitor Center. Plan ahead and prepare, your safety is your responsibility.

Potable Drinking Water Availability in Zion Canyon

  • Zion Canyon Visitor Center
  • South and Watchman Campground
  • Zion Human History Museum
  • Zion Lodge
  • The Grotto
  • Temple of Sinawava


Rivers, Creeks, and Washes
There are many perennial, intermittent, and ephemeral streams throughout Zion. Water obtained from these rivers, creeks, and washes should always be properly treated.

Springs and Seeps
A spring is a place where water naturally flows out of the ground. Water flow magnitude at natural springs can vary throughout the park and may not always be reliable.

  • Never drink untreated spring water.
  • Springs should be used as an emergency source for water, not as a primary source.
  • Overnight camping is not permitted within a ¼ mile of any spring.


Water Treatment
CDC Guide to Water Treatment for Backcountry & Travel Use
Water collected in the Zion Wilderness is not safe to drink without proper treatment. Except for boiling, few water treatment methods are 100% effective in removing all pathogens.

  • Boiling can be used as a pathogen reduction method that should kill all pathogens. For most elevations in Zion, water should be brought to a rolling boil for 3 minutes.
  • Filtration can be used as a pathogen reduction method against most microorganisms. Manufacturer’s instructions must be followed.
  • Disinfection can be used as a pathogen reduction method against microorganisms. However many factors can impact the effectiveness of chemical disinfection. The length of time and concentration of disinfectant varies by manufacturer and effectiveness of pathogen reduction depends on the product. 100% effectiveness may not be achieved.
  • If boiling water is not possible, a combination of filtration and chemical disinfection is the most effective treatment method for drinking water in the Zion Wilderness.

Water Availability in the Zion Wilderness

North Fork of the Virgin River (Narrows)

  • Untreated water from the Virgin River and its springs is not safe to drink. It has passed over rangeland and may be contaminated with illness-causing bacteria.
  • Boil all water you collect, or treat with a combination of filtration and disinfection.
  • Water should NOT be collected above the confluence with Deep Creek.
  • Big Spring is a reliable source for obtaining water and, like all other natural springs in the park, its water should always be properly treated.

Kolob Canyons

  • Timber Creek: Intermittent stream that usually is dry by early spring after snowmelt.
  • LaVerkin Creek: Perennial stream that flows year round. Water is muddy during spring snowmelt and after rain events.
  • Beatty Spring: Usually flows year round.
    • Located between campsites 10 and 11 where the trail crosses LaVerkin Creek.

Hop Valley

  • Due to a private cattle ranch within the park, water may be contaminated and should NOT be obtained from Hop Valley.

Wildcat Canyon Trail

  • Wildcat Spring: Usually has a small flow year-round.
    • Located on the northside of the Wildcat Canyon Trail, 1.5 miles from the junction of the Wildcat Canyon Trail and the West Rim Trail.
    • Overnight camping is not permitted within a ¼ mile of the spring.

West Rim

  • Sawmill Springs: Usually is dry by early to mid summer. Not a reliable water source.
    • Located near campsite 9 on the West Rim Trail.
  • Potato Hollow Spring: Usually is dry by mid to late summer. Not a reliable water source.
    • Located near campsite 8 on the West Rim Trail.
  • West Rim (Cabin) Spring: Usually has a small flow year-round.
    • Located near campsite 2 on the West Rim Trail.

East Rim

  • Stave Spring: Usually is dry by early summer. Not a reliable water source
    • Located near the junction of the East Rim Trail and Cable Mountain Trail.
    • Overnight camping is not permitted within a ¼ mile of the spring.

Southwest Desert

  • Coalpits Wash Spring: Usually flows year round.
    • Located near campsite 5 in Coalpits Wash.
 
 
 
 

Last updated: July 2, 2019

Contact the Park

Mailing Address:

Zion National Park
1 Zion Park Blvd.
State Route 9

Springdale, UT 84767

Phone:

(435) 772-3256
Staffed daily from 9 am - 1 pm. Recorded information is available 24 hours a day. If you are unable to reach someone by phone, please email us at zion_park_information@nps.gov.

Contact Us