Boreal Chorus Frog

A tan frog with black spots on a glistening moss
Boreal chorus frogs are widely distributed in Yellowstone.

NPS/Jay Fleming

 

Scientific Name

Pseudacris maculata

Identification

  • Adults reach 1 to 1.5 inches in length, and females are usually larger than males; newly metamorphosed juveniles are less than 1 inch long.
  • Brown, olive, tan, or green (sometimes bicolored) with a prominent black stripe on each side from the nostril through the eye and down the sides to the groin; three dark stripes down the back, often incomplete or broken into blotches.

Habitat

  • Common, but seldom seen due to its small size and secretive habits.
  • Lives in moist meadows and forests near wetlands.
  • Lays eggs in loose, irregular clusters attached to submerged vegetation in quiet water.

Behavior

  • Breeds in shallow temporary pools or ponds during the late spring.
  • Calls are very conspicuous, resembling the sound of a thumb running along the teeth of a comb.
  • Males call and respond, producing a loud and continuous chorus at good breeding sites, from April to early July, depending on elevation and weather.
  • Usually call in late afternoon and evening.
  • Tadpoles eat aquatic plants; adults mostly eat insects.
  • Eaten by fish, predacious aquatic insect larvae, other amphibians, garter snakes, mammals, and birds.
 
Two dark green glistening salamanders with light green bellies side by side on gravel

Western Tiger Salamander

Western tiger salamanders are common and abundant in some areas of Yellowstone.

A frog on a small log with white belly and dark green back reflected in water

Columbia Spotted Frog

To survive the winter, Columbia spotted frogs go into water that does not freeze.

A bumpy, black spotted rests on top of another toad

Western Toad

Western toads were once common throughout Yellowstone.

A green and brown bumpy toad in held in the hollow of two gloved hands

Plains Spadefoot Toad

In 2015, a breeding population of plains spadefoot toads was confirmed in Yellowstone.

A frog with stretched chin in water

Amphibians

Amphibians are valuable indicators of stressors such as disease or climate change.

Last updated: June 9, 2017

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Yellowstone National Park, WY 82190-0168

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