American Dipper

A small bird searching for insects along a snowy stream.
American dipper hunting for aquatic insects.

NPS/Diane Renkin

The dark gray American dipper (Cinclus mexicanus) bobs beside streams and rivers. Also called the water ouzel, the dipper dives into the water and swims in search of aquatic insects. Thick downy feathers made waterproof with oil from a preen gland enable this bird to thrive in cold waters.
 

Resource

Kingery, H.E. and M.F. Willson. American dipper. The Birds of North America Online. https://birdsna.org/Species-Account/bna/species/amedip/introduction

 
Bald eagle standing over a fish that it's eating.

Bald Eagle

Bald eagles can be seen along Yellowstone's many rivers and lakes.

An osprey comes in for a landing on a nest, where its mate tends the nest.

Osprey

Osprey summer in Yellowstone, fishing and raising young.

A peregrine falcon perched on a branch.

Peregrine Falcon

Peregrine falcons are some of the fastest birds.

A large dark bird stands over the remains of a carcass on a snowbank next to a body of water.

Golden Eagle

Golden eagles are named for the yellow feathers at the base of the neck.

A large flock of white birds on the shore of an island.

Colony Nesting Birds

American white pelicans and other colonial nesting birds nest primarily on the Molly Islands in the southeast arm of Yellowstone Lake.

Two birds with black heads, red eyes, and black & white bodies swim in a lake.

Common Loon

Loons in Yellowstone are some of the southern most breeding populations.

A pair of swans swimming on a lake.

Trumpeter Swan

Trumpeter swans are the largest wild waterfowl in North America.

A white-breasted bird with gray and black wings and black beak on a mound of snow

Songbirds and Woodpeckers

Passerine and near passerine species comprise the majority of bird species in Yellowstone.

Profile of a raven's head and chest

Raven

Ravens are smart birds, able to put together cause and effect.

A sandhill crane walking through a marshy landscape.

Sandhill Crane

Sandhill cranes nest in Yellowstone during the summer.

An eared grebe near Mammoth Hot Springs

Sound Library

Immerse yourself in the aural splendor of Yellowstone.

A striped black & white bird with a red patch on the back of it's head perches on a tree trunk.

Birds

Spring is a wonderful time to look for birds, as migration brings many birds back to the park.

Last updated: August 26, 2019

Contact the Park

Mailing Address:

PO Box 168
Yellowstone National Park, WY 82190-0168

Phone:

307-344-7381

Contact Us