Superintendent's Compendium

In accordance with regulations and the delegated authority provided in Title 36, Code of Federal Regulations (“36 CFR”), Chapter 1, Parts 1-7, authorized by Title 16 United States Code, section 3, the following provisions apply to all lands and waters administered by the National Park Service, within the boundaries of Yellowstone National Park. Unless otherwise stated, these regulatory provisions apply in addition to the requirements contained in 36 CFR, Chapter 1, Parts 1-7.

Introduction

The purpose of the compendium is to provide the public and park employees with a document that lists the special designations, closures, public use limits, permit requirements and other restrictions imposed under the discretionary authority of the Superintendent. The Superintendent’s authority to implement these provisions is found in Title 36, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), § 1.5(a). The compendium is available to the public upon request. The compendium will be reviewed and updated annually or as needed to ensure adequate protection of the park’s resources, provide for public safety and enjoyment and to address changes in public use patterns.

The provisions found in this compendium constitute only one of many tools designed to manage and protect Yellowstone National Park. It is important to utilize this document in conjunction with Title 36, Code of Federal Regulations, which includes the full text of National Park Service regulations, including those authorizing the provisions outlined in this compendium. Chapter I, Parts 1-7, of Title 36, include sections addressing resource protection, public use, recreation, boating, vehicles and traffic safety, commercial operations, and special regulations. These regulations are applicable on all federally owned lands and waters within the boundaries of Yellowstone National Park and on lands and waters under the administrative control of the National Park Service. In addition, certain regulations found within Title 36 are applicable on non-federally owned lands under the legislative jurisdiction of the United States. Interested parties may also wish to review Yellowstone National Park planning documents including the General Management Plan, Resource Management Plan, and Commercial Services Plan.

Fines and mandatory court appearances (M/A) for violations of the regulations set forth in the Superintendent’s Compendium for Yellowstone National Park are set by the U.S District Court. For a list of fines and M/A’s refer to the Yellowstone National Park Bond Schedule.

It is the intent of this compendium, in conjunction with park brochures, maps, signs and other media, to help provide the public and park employees with a clear understanding of park rules and regulations. Any questions or requests for additional information should be addressed to the Superintendent’s Office. We welcome your comments and suggestions.

36 CFR Part 1: General Provisions

36 CFR § 1.2: Applicability and Scope

36 CFR § 1.4: Definitions

Administrative travel
Travel in vehicles (wheeled or over snow) owned, leased and/or operated by the National Park Service (NPS), NPS Partners, NPS authorized concessioners and contractors, and those privately owned/leased by NPS, concessioner, and contractor employees living in the interior. This travel is permitted to ensure protection of park resources, provide visitor services, ensure visitor and employee safety, maintain assets or provide “outside” access for those who live and work in the interior of YNP.

Bear Spray
Also known as bear deterrent, bear repellent, bear pepper spray or bear spray. Bear spray is a chemical formula designed specifically to deter aggressive or attacking bears. It must be registered with the Environmental Protection Agency and individual states. It must be commercially manufactured and labeled as “Bear Spray”. Bear spray must contain between 1% to 2% of the active ingredients capsaicin and related capsaicinoids.

Bear resistant food container (BRFC)
An item constructed of a solid, non-pliable material to prevent access by a bear. BRFCs allowed include personal backpacking canisters, stock panniers and coolers approved and listed by the Interagency Grizzly Bear Committee (http://www.igbconline.org/html/safety.html). Items or methods are approved by the Superintendent.

Boiling River
That section of the Gardner River where any waters associated with, or originating from the Boiling River thermal system enter the watercourse.

Catch and release
All fish caught shall be carefully and immediately returned to the water from which they were taken.

Class A Campground
Campground with flush toilets and running water.

Class B Campground
Campground with vault toilets and/or water pumps.

Coggins Test
Blood test which identifies Equine Infectious Anemia which is caused by a viral infection that affects the immune system of equine species. Equine species are horses, burros and mules but not llamas.

Core camp
That area of a designated campsite within a 100-foot radius of the fire ring, or when no fire ring exists, that area within a 100-foot radius of the cooking area.

Drainage
The area drained by a river and its connecting tributaries and lakes.

Dropper or drop fly
A second fly attached to a leader.

Drug free school zone
That area within a radius of 1,000 feet of the Snoopy School/Mammoth Community Center, the Mammoth Little People's Learning Center and the NPS lands adjacent to the Gardiner public school. (21 USC 860)

Fly fishing
Only artificial flies may be used to attract and catch fish, regardless of the type of rod or line.

Firehole Swim Area
That section of the Firehole River that is designated by signage as the ‘swim area’. The swim area, located 2 miles south of Madison Junction on the Firehole Canyon Drive, generally begins at the narrow rapids between the cliffs on the upper end and ends where the large flat section of river becomes narrow again – approximately 250 yards below the rapids.

Geothermal area
Any area where surface manifestations of hot springs, geysers, mud springs, fumaroles or warm ground are present.

Lead fishing tackle
Prohibited: Leaded split-shot sinkers, weighted jigs (lead molded to a hook) and soft lead-weighted ribbon. Permitted: Lures containing lead such as rooster tails and Panther Martins, cannonballs or downriggers and flies with lead tied to their bodies.

Learner or Instruction Driver’s Permit
License or permit secured by a person from their State motor vehicle division that grants the privilege to drive or operate a motor vehicle on the public roadways of the State. Licenses with conditions or provisions requiring operator to be supervised are not valid for snowmobile operation.

Madison Campground Thermal Area
The stream and several geothermal features in and along the banks and bed of the secondary channel of the Madison River adjacent to H loop of the campground.

Multipurpose Vehicle
A motor vehicle that is:

  1. Designed to travel on at least 4 wheels in contact with the ground
  2. Has an empty weight of at least 300 pounds, but less than 3,000 pounds
  3. Has an upright seat or saddle for the driver which is mounted at least 24 inches from the ground
  4. Has an identifying number as defined by W.S. 31-1-101(a)(ix)

Pack animals
Horses, burros, mules, ponies and llamas only.

Tributary
Any stream which flows into a river or lake.

Unmanned Aircraft
The term "unmanned aircraft" means a device that is used or intended to be used for flight in the air without the possibility of direct human intervention from within or on the device, and the associated operational elements and components that are required for the pilot or system operator in command to operate or control the device (such as cameras, sensors, communication links). This term includes all types of devices that meet this definition (e.g., model airplanes, quadcopters, drones) that are used for any purpose, including for recreation or commerce.

Upgrading
The practice of substituting captured fish for fish in possession; usually to keep larger or different fish species.

36 CFR § 1.5: Closures and Public Use Limits

General

(1) The Superintendent may temporarily close park roadways, parking areas, facilities, waters, and all or portions of the park when such actions are deemed necessary to ensure public safety, protection of resources, or the avoidance of visitor use conflicts. The posting of signs, maps, media announcements, and the use of barricades and/or gates will identify such closures.

Consistent with applicable legislation and Federal administrative polices, the Superintendent has established the following rules, designations, conditions and restrictions on the following park activities; 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2):

The Superintendent has determined that use of this discretionary authority is necessary for resource protection and public safety.

Anchoring restrictions in Yellowstone Lake adjacent to Bridge Bay Meadows

(2) Anchoring to the Yellowstone Lake bottom within 300 yards of the shoreline between Bridge Bay Lagoon channel and the Lake Hotel is prohibited. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

The Superintendent has this use restriction is necessary to protect resources, including maintaining an unimpaired view shed.

Bear Spray

(3) Bear spray may be carried by individuals within Yellowstone National Park for the strict purpose of protecting one’s self or others from bodily harm against aggressive wildlife. It should not be applied to people, tents, packs, other equipment or surrounding area as a repellent. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

The Superintendent has determined that the use of Bear Spray in a manner consistent with IGBC recommendation is appropriate as a deterrent to negative human/bear encounters.

Bicycle Routes, designated

(4) Designated bicycle routes include: 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

Mammoth area:

  • The abandoned railroad bed paralleling the Yellowstone River between Gardiner & the park boundary at Reese Creek. (5 miles)
  • Golden Gate service road between Golden Gate and Joffe Lake. (1.5 miles)
  • Mammoth service road beginning at the top of the hill on the Old Gardiner Road above Mammoth running northwest to the telephone microwave station. (1.5 miles)
  • The Old Gardiner road (5 miles)
  • The foot trail paralleling the east side of the Grand Loop road, beginning in front of the Mammoth Restroom and running south to the YCC camp road.
  • The Bunsen Peak road. (6 miles) g. Swan Lake gravel pit road, six miles south of Mammoth. (1 mile)
  • Obsidian creek campground road, adjacent to the entrance to the Indian Creek campground. (0.4 mile)

Old Faithful area:

  • Lone Star Geyser road from the Grand Loop Road to the geyser parking lot turnaround. (2 miles)
  • The paved trail beginning in front of the Lower General Store to Morning Glory pool. (1 mile)
  • The lighted employee trail from Bitterroot dorm to the Fire Road. (0.4 miles)
  • Daisy Geyser cut-off to Biscuit Basin (abandoned service road). (1.4 miles)
  • Fountain Freight road. (3.5 miles)

Lake area:

  • Natural Bridge road near Bridge Bay. (1 mile)
  • The old roadbed between the Lake fish hatchery building and the transfer station. (1 mile)

Tower-Lamar areas:

  • Mount Washburn service road, from the Chittenden Road parking lot to the summit of Mt. Washburn. (3 miles)

West Entrance area:

  • Riverside trail from entrance area to Barns road. (1.4 miles)

Spring/Fall Bicycle Routes

Public day use bicycling may occur, as conditions allow, on the following sections of the Grand Loop Road which may be open after the November wheeled vehicle closure, and prior to the April wheeled vehicle road opening in conjunction with administrative vehicular travel:

  • Mammoth Hot Springs to West Yellowstone
  • Snake River Entrance Station to West Thumb Junction
  • East Entrance to the east end of Sylvan Pass (6 mile corner)
  • Fall ONLY: Tower Junction to the Chittenden Road as conditions allow.
  • Spring ONLY: The roadway south of Tower Fall (Dunraven Pass) beginning the second Friday in May.
  • Fall ONLY: Madison Junction to Old Faithful 36 CFR 1.5 (a)(1)

The Superintendent has determined that these public bicycling restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

Boiling River

The following are prohibited:

(5) Swimming, wading, bathing, soaking, or in any way entering the Gardner River in the area defined as the Boiling River area except during times that the area is posted as open. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

(6) Swimming, wading, bathing, soaking or in any way entering or placing objects in the Boiling River Thermal Channel prior to its confluence with the Gardner River. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

(7) Use of soap, shampoo, conditioner or any other substance while bathing, soaking, etc., regardless of “biodegradable” status of the substance. The use of sunscreen is permitted. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

(8) Leaving the designated trail system in the vicinity of the Boiling River area, where fencing and signage prohibit such travel. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

The Superintendent has determined that these restrictions are necessary to protect the resource and enhance public safety.

Bridge Bay Marina Channel

(9) Swimming in the marina entrance channel is prohibited. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

The Superintendent has determined that this use prohibition is necessary for public and boating safety.

Bridge Jumping Closure

(10) Jumping, diving, or rappelling off of any bridge structure in the park is prohibited. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

The Superintendent has determined that this prohibition is necessary for public and traffic safety.

Closed waters for motorized vessels

(11) Operating any motor vessel (gas or electric) on waters restricted to non-motorized use only is prohibited unless the motor is tipped out of the water or removed from the transom. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

The Superintendent has determined that this use restriction is necessary in order to ensure wilderness character and values.

Commercial Vehicle Travel Restrictions

(12) Commercial motor vehicle permits – Authorization (through the Visitor Services Office) is required for vehicles exceeding the statutory size and weight limits (wider than 8’6” or longer than 75’). Also see compendium # 67. The special requirements shall not apply to the transportation of asphalt products required to repair or maintain roads within Yellowstone National Park. 36 CFR § 1.5 (d)

(13) Authorized oversize and overweight vehicles must travel between 9:00 p.m. and 9:00 a.m., from the Friday before Memorial Day through September 15th. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

(14) The authorized transportation of combustible or flammable petroleum products in vehicles not exceeding the following size will be allowed between 9:00 p.m. and 12:00 p.m., Memorial Day through September 15th: Length-30'; width-8'6"; height-13'6"; gross weight- 80,000 pounds. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

(15) Authorized vehicles transporting combustible or flammable petroleum products exceeding the above dimensions are required to travel between 9:00 p.m. and 9:00 a.m. Memorial Day through September 15th. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

The Superintendent has determined that this use restriction and permit requirement is necessary for public and traffic safety.

Disturbing Wildlife

The following are prohibited:

(16) Willfully approaching, remaining, viewing, or engaging in any activity within 100 yards of bears or wolves, or within 25 yards of any other wildlife including nesting birds, or within any distance that disturbs, displaces, or otherwise interferes with the free unimpeded movement of wildlife, or creates or contributes to a potentially hazardous condition or situation. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

(17) Failure to remove one’s self to prescribed distances during inadvertent, accidental, casual or surprise encounters with wildlife. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

(18) Failure to comply as directed by NPS staff (employees, volunteers, or agents) engaged in administering wildlife management operations or managing wildlife viewing opportunities. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

(19) The prohibitions in this paragraph do not apply to persons who are in compliance with written protocol approved by the Superintendent; in accordance with the terms and conditions of a permit from the Superintendent, or park personnel acting within the scope of approved management activities. 36 CFR 1.5(a)(2)

The Superintendent has determined that these public use restrictions and requirements are necessary to maximize public safety; protect wildlife; and provide park staff with the flexibility to situationally manage dynamic, diverse and rapidly evolving wildlife viewing opportunities.

Firearms Range Use Limits

(20) The NPS Firearms Ranges are closed to public use. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

The Superintendent has determined that this closure is necessary for resource protection and public and employee safety.

Firehole Swim Area

The following are prohibited:

(21) Swimming, wading, bathing, soaking, or in any way entering (to include fishing)the Firehole River in the area defined as the Firehole Swim Area except during times that the area is posted as open. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

(22) Climbing, diving or jumping from the cliffs or from trees in the area known as the Firehole Swimming Area is prohibited. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

(23) Possession of glass beverage containers in the Firehole swim area. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

(24) Use of soap, shampoo, conditioner or any other substance while swimming, bathing, soaking, etc. regardless of “biodegradable” status of the substance. The use of sunscreen is permitted. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

(25) Use of floatation devices such as inflatable rafts and tubes, noodles, pool floats, or other water vessel in the area known as the Firehole swim area. Life jackets are recommended. “Water wings” are allowed. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

(26) Leaving the designated trail system in the vicinity of the Firehole Swim Area, where fencing and signage prohibit such travel. 36CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

The Superintendent has determined that these use prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

Food in Thermal Areas

(27) The possession or use of food and beverages, except when contained in a pack-like container for carrying purposes, is prohibited in all geothermal areas. Water is not considered a beverage. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

The Superintendent has determined that this restriction is necessary to protect and prevent impact to geothermal resources.

Frank Island and Stevenson Island Closure

(28) Frank Island (except the picnic area on the south point) and the south end of Stevenson Island are closed to public use between May 15 and August 15. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

The Superintendent has determined that these use prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

Grand Canyon Off Trail Use

(29) The Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone is closed to off-trail travel, including climbing, between the Chittenden Bridge and Silver Cord Cascade. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

The Superintendent has determined that this closure is necessary for public safety and protection of resources including view sheds.

Gyroscopically controlled mobility devices

(30) The use of Segways or similar gyroscopically controlled devices in lieu of manual or motorized wheelchairs is allowed by persons with disabilities who would otherwise only have the option of using a manual or powered wheelchair with the following restrictions:

  • A person using a Segway or similar gyroscopically controlled device in Yellowstone National Park would be medically determined to have a permanent disability that severely limits one or more major life functions. A permanent disability is a permanent physical, mental, or sensory impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities, such as caring for oneself, performing manual tasks, walking, seeing, hearing, speaking, breathing, learning, and working.
  • Persons claiming disability will show proof of medically determined permanent disability or eligibility for receiving benefits under federal law following the guidelines in effect for obtaining an America the Beautiful – Access Pass, e.g: a statement by a licensed physician; a document issued by a Federal agency such as Veterans Administration; Social Security Disability Income; Supplemental Security Income; or a document by a state agency such as a vocational rehabilitation agency.
  • Segways may be used in front country areas on sidewalks, formalized paved overlooks, and campgrounds, although terrain may limit their success.
  • Segways may not be operated along the edges of major roads, or used on major roads (due to congestion, visibility and speeds of vehicles operating in these areas) or on park boardwalks (due to the proximity to thermal features and the hazards associated with these areas.)
  • Segways may not be operated at speeds greater than 2-3 mph, the equivalent of a walking pedestrian. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

The Superintendent has determined that these use conditions are necessary to ensure public safety and the safety of ADA defined users.

Introduction of non native or invasive species

(31) It is illegal to knowingly transport on park roads/trails or introduce any non-native or invasive species by angling equipment, or to launch a vessel or trailer in park waters with these species attached. Non-native or invasive species may include aquatic plants, animals and micro-organisms. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

The Superintendent has determined that this prohibition and use restriction is necessary to protect park aquatic resources.

Boat landing areas, prohibited

(32) Within 25 feet of any geothermal area. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

The Superintendent has determined that these use prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

(33) On the shoreline of Yellowstone Lake between Little Thumb Creek and the south end of the West Thumb geothermal area. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

The Superintendent has determined that these use prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

(34) At sensitive wildlife areas as designated by signs or as posted on maps in visitor use areas. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

The Superintendent has determined that these use prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

Firehole River Closure

(35) The Firehole River is closed to swimming, bathing and fishing 200 yards upstream and 200 yards downstream from the bridge connecting Midway Geyser Basin and the adjacent parking area. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

The Superintendent has determined that these use prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

(36) The Firehole River is closed to swimming and bathing from the road bridge ½ mile upstream of Old Faithful Geyser to the road bridge at Biscuit Basin. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

The Superintendent has determined that these use prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

Obsidian Cliff

(37) Entering, climbing, walking, accessing or collecting archaeological or mineral samples, specimens, or materials in the Obsidian Cliff area is prohibited. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

The Superintendent has determined that this area closure is required to protect this sensitive cultural and geologic resource.

Multipurpose Vehicles

(38) The operation of Multipurpose Vehicles (MPVs) that are licensed for highway use pursuant to current standards of the Wyoming Department of Transportation, and meet applicable federal motor vehicle safety standards, is allowed within Yellowstone National Park when the park is open to public wheeled motor vehicle traffic, on paved road segments and unpaved access roads to developed front country campgrounds designated for use by wheeled motor vehicles. MPVs are prohibited from being operated on the park portion of US Highway 191(mile post 11-31). In addition to possession of valid registration, operator’s license and proof of insurance, it is the obligation of the operator to provide documentation from the manufacturer that the MPV meets federal motor vehicle safety standards. Typically this can be confirmed by manufacturer stickers on the vehicle; text in the owner’s manual or by checking tires for “Not for Highway Use” text. MPVs will be subject to payment of the single motor vehicle entrance fee. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

The Superintendent has determined that this mode of transportation is permissible as a matter of visitor personal choice, assuming standards outlined in #40 are met.

(39) MPVs may be allowed for administrative purposes, such as fire control, search and rescue, law enforcement, resource management activities, power line maintenance, campground management and snow removal from residential driveways and sidewalks when approved by the Superintendent. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

The Superintendent has determined that administrative use of MPVs is allowed pursuant to demonstrated operational need, and adherence to Departmental, Agency and park policy governing MPV use and standards.

Unmanned Aircraft

(40) Launching, landing, or operating an unmanned aircraft from or on lands and waters administered by the National Park Service within the boundaries of Yellowstone National Park is prohibited except as approved in writing by the Superintendent.

The Superintendent has determined that unmanaged or unrestricted recreational use of UAs within Yellowstone National Park will conflict with, or impact, a variety of park uses including visitor experience of unimpaired view sheds; the disturbance, displacement or harassment of park wildlife to include threatened and endangered species present potential for impacts or damage to sensitive geothermal areas; creation of public safety hazards per operation near roadways or large aggregations of visitors, and visual or aural impacts to wilderness character and values within the park backcountry. Less restrictive measures were not considered sufficient due to the rapidly expanding and evolving use of UAs throughout the world. Section 1.5 of NPS Management Policies 2006 provide that a new form of park use may be allowed within a park only after a determination has been made by the park Superintendent that it will not result in unacceptable impacts on park resources and values.

Official Use in Closed Areas

(41) Areas closed to the general public because of resource management or research activities may be entered by persons or groups led by authorized park employees or park agents, as approved by the Chief Ranger, if such entry and use does not compromise safety, environmental, scenic, natural or cultural values. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

The Superintendent has determined that such administrative use discretion is necessary for effective resource protection, educational and research purposes.

Pets Prohibited in Nondeveloped Areas, Boardwalks and Trails

(42) Pets, including dogs, cats and other domesticated or agricultural animals are prohibited in non-developed areas, boardwalks and trails. The prohibitions in this paragraph do not apply to animals such as service animals, riding stock or pack animals, persons in compliance with written protocol approved by the Superintendent or in accordance with a permit from the Superintendent. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

The Superintendent has determined that this restriction is necessary to ensure resource protection, pet well being and public safety.

Quiet Hours

(43) Quiet hours in all campgrounds, backcountry campsites, developed areas and parking areas (including cabin, hotel and employee areas) are from 10 p.m. to 6 a.m. Quiet hours for the use of generators (allowed only in Mammoth, Canyon, Fishing Bridge, Bridge Bay, Grant Village and Madison campgrounds), are from 8:00 p.m. to 8 a.m. Portable or fixed motors or any type of noise producing machine or activity which creates unusual noise or unreasonably disturbs other visitors or residents is prohibited. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

The Superintendent has determined that these use prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

Road Closures

(44) Service and administrative roads are closed to non-official vehicle use: All service and administrative roads, so designated by signs and/or locked gates, or barricaded with logs and/or boulders. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

The Superintendent has determined that these use prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

(45) Wheeled Buses, Trailers, & Recreational Vehicles are prohibited from Firehole Canyon Drive. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

The Superintendent has determined that these use prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

(46) Vehicles over 6 tons (recreational vehicles, buses, motorhomes) are prohibited on Firehole Lake Drive. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

Federal Highways has placed a 6 ton weight limit on the bridge at Firehole Lake, so the Superintendent has determined that these use prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection

Winter season road closures and restrictions

The following roads are closed seasonally to vehicles. Actual closure dates will depend on weather and road conditions:

(47) Between the first Monday in November and spring road opening(s) in April and May, the Grand Loop Road is closed to public wheeled vehicle traffic. The portion of the Grand Loop road from Mammoth Hot Springs to the Tower Junction and the Northeast Entrance road to Cooke City remain open to wheeled vehicle traffic year round as weather and conditions permit. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

The Superintendent has determined that these use prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety.

(48) During the winter use season park roads open to over snow vehicles will be closed to all commercial traffic between 9 p.m. and 7 a.m. except pursuant to a special use permit issued by the Superintendent or his/her representative. Administrative travel necessary for park operations is excepted. Opening and closing dates for the winter use season are set annually. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

The Superintendent has determined that these use prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection to include soundscapes and air quality.

(49) The Firehole Canyon Drive is open to snowmobiles and Long -track Snowcoaches for SOUTHBOUND travel only from 7 am to 12 noon; and to snowcoaches for NORTHBOUND travel only from 1 pm to 6 pm. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

(50) Permitted operators may be required to delay or cancel trips into YNP if the NPS determines that park roads are unsafe or unsuitable for access by oversnow vehicles. Roads may close on short notice if unsafe conditions exist. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

The Superintendent has determined that these use prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection to include soundscapes and air quality.

SCUBA

(51) SCUBA diving or snorkeling is prohibited in the Yellowstone River from the Yellowstone Lake outlet downstream for one mile. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

The Superintendent has determined that these use prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection, specifically aquatic resources.

Speed Limits on Lakes

(52) Maximum speed limit for all vessels on lakes open to motorized boating is 45 mph or as otherwise posted by markers or as specified in boat permit rules. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

The Superintendent has determined that these use prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

Stephens Creek Administrative Facility

(53) The area called the Stephens Creek Administrative Facility, as comprised by the Stephens Creek Access Road, the Stephens Creek corral and barn facilities, the Stephens Creek firearms range, and the surrounding terrain 25 to 50 yards around these facilities as marked by National Park Service closure signs, is closed to public use. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

The Superintendent has determined that this closure is necessary for resource protection and public and employee safety.

Sylvan Pass Avalanche Area Restrictions

(54) Entering the Sylvan Pass avalanche control area is prohibited:

  • The Sylvan Pass avalanche control area is the south aspect of Hoyt Peak extending from a point one half of a mile east of the Avalanche Peak Trailhead to a point 1.6 miles east of the Avalanche Peak Trailhead
  • Entering the Sylvan Pass howitzer platform and access road is prohibited.
  • Stopping or parking vehicles within the closure areas is prohibited. Specific closed areas are designated by on-site signs, and maps at the East Entrance and Lake Ranger Stations, Appendix B of the Yellowstone National Park Avalanche Control Plan, and the Chief Rangers Office. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

The Superintendent has determined that these use prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection

Telemetry

(55) The possession or use of any radio electronic signal receiving device set at, or capable of being set at, the frequencies assigned to the National Park Service, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Interagency Bear Management Team, or any other permitted wildlife research operation within the exterior boundaries of Yellowstone National Park for the purpose of tracking or monitoring the location or travel routes of wildlife equipped with radio transmission collars or tracking devices is prohibited. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

The Superintendent has determined that these use prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

Vessel Size Limits

(56) No vessel 40 feet or more in length shall be placed in or operated upon waters within the park. This paragraph shall not apply to permitted concession operated or sightseeing vessels. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2), 36 CFR § 3.6 (l)

The Superintendent has determined that these use prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection to include water quality and fisheries.

Vessel Storage

(57) Persons authorized to live in the park during the non-boating season may store vessels and related equipment at locations designated by the Superintendent. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

The Superintendent has determined that these use prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

Wildlife Management Area Closures

(58) Visitor use may be limited in areas and on trails identified by on-site signs and/or by maps posted in the Superintendent's office. Area use may be adjusted seasonally and at varying restrictive levels depending on wildlife activity, available food, and/or park management operational needs. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

(59) Grizzly Bear Management: The administrative activities conducted by Yellowstone National Park, or its agents, relative to the management and handling of grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis), and their habitat, will be in accordance with guidelines, procedures, and rules described in the “Final Environmental Impact Statement, Grizzly Bear Management Program”, “Yellowstone National Park Annual Bear Management Plan,” and “Yellowstone National Park Bear Hazing Plan”, and, upon de-listing of the species from Threatened Status by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, in accordance with the “Conservation Strategy for the Grizzly Bear in the Greater Yellowstone Area.” 36 CFR § 1.5(a)(2), 1.7(b), 1.2 (d), and 2.10(d)

The Superintendent has determined that these use prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

(60) Wolf Monitoring, Management, and Information Sharing: The administrative activities conducted by Yellowstone National Park or its agents, relative to the monitoring, management, and information sharing regarding gray wolves, will be in accordance with the guidelines, procedures, and rules described in The Reintroduction of Gray Wolves to Yellowstone National Park and Central Idaho, Final Environmental Impact Statement, the Memorandum of Understanding Between the National Park Service and the Wyoming Game and Fish (June 25, 2004), and the Yellowstone National Park Habituated Wolf Management Plan (September 12, 2003). In addition, wolf monitoring activities will, at a minimum, include:

1) Population Size – Maintain radio collars in all packs so number of YNP packs and individuals can be counted each calendar year.

2) Breeding Pairs - Consistent with the USFWS delisting criteria, assess composition for each YNP pack to determine if an adult male and female wolf with two pups survive until December 31. a) Reproduction – Determine reproduction (pups born/survived) for each pack in YNP/year and assess mortality and cause.

3) Distribution – Through aerial tracking of radio collared wolves, determine the areas and habitats used by wolves in YNP (also see objective #5).

4) Survival – Using standard survival estimates derived from radio collars, determine sex and age specific survival for YNP wolves. Assess mortality cause and identify if management action is necessary (e.g., unnatural mortality). a. Disease – Assess exposure to unnatural diseases (e.g., mange and other introduced canine pathogens) and determine if management action is necessary.

5) Dispersal – Determine trans-boundary movement of individual wolves and packs with the states of Idaho, Montana, and Wyoming. 36 CFR § 1.2 (d)

The Superintendent has determined that these use prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

Yellowstone River Access

(61) The following closures and use restrictions apply to the portion of Yellowstone National Park contiguous to the Yellowstone River in the north boundary area of park (boundary delineation defined as the average high water mark), beginning at the mouth of the Gardner river and following the park boundary northwest to the boundary corner at the mouth of Reese Creek:

  • Angler access to the river through the park is allowed. No park fishing license required.
  • Pet access to the river in this area is prohibited.
  • The put in and take out of boats, rafts, kayaks, and other watercraft in this area is prohibited with the exception of the foot access to private land behind the concession dormitory. Private land owner permission is required to utilize the launch area at the confluence of the Yellowstone and Gardner rivers. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

Violation of above closures, designations, uses or activity restrictions or conditions, schedules of visiting hours, or public use limits of this section is prohibited. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

The Superintendent has determined that these use prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

36 CFR § 1.6: Permits

Engaging in the following activities without first obtaining the required permit is prohibited. An application for a permit should be submitted to the Superintendent during normal business hours. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2), 1.6 (a)

The Superintendent has determined that these use prohibitions, restrictions, regulations and permitting are necessary for public safety and protection of fisheries, water quality, wilderness values.

Boating Permits

(63) Operators/passengers on all motorized and non-motorized vessels, including float tubes and windsurfers are required to have a US Coast Guard approved, wearable PFD. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2), 1.6 (a)

Camping Permits

(64) A permit is required to camp within Yellowstone National Park. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2), 1.6 (a)

Cave Entry Permits

(65) Entering caves, pits or sink holes which are the result of thermal and/or seismic activity is prohibited without a written permit from the Superintendent. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2), 1.6 (a)

The Superintendent has determined that these use prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection. The presence of noxious and harmful gases requires appropriate training and equipment to protect entrants from injury. The resources in the caves are fragile and should not be subject to frequent public use.

Commercial Backcountry Trail Use

(66) Park trails and backcountry areas shall not be used by individuals or parties packing, carrying or hauling materials or supplies for commercial hunting camps or other commercial activities based outside the exterior park boundaries except as authorized in the concessions contract and operating plan. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2), 1.6 (a)

The Superintendent has determined that these use prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection to include soundscapes and air quality.

Commercial Vehicle Permits

(67) Authorization is required for vehicles exceeding the statutory size and weight limits (wider than 8’6” or longer than 75’). Authorization may be obtained through the Visitor’s Services Office in Mammoth Hot Springs. 36 CFR § 1.6 (a), 36 CFR 7.13 (a)(4). See section 1.5 of this document, entries 12-15, for use restrictions and limits.

The Superintendent has determined that these use prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

Cooke City Resident Permits

(68) Cooke City area residents are required to display a decal issued by the Superintendent on their personal vehicles to allow convenient non-fee entrance into the park. This decal will be issued at the Northeast Entrance Station and will allow travel only between the North and Northeast Entrances. 36 CFR § 1.6 (a)

The Superintendent has determined that these use prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

Fishing Permits

All individuals fishing within the exterior boundaries of Yellowstone National Park are subject to following the most recent fishing regulations. This is particularly important during special closures implemented to protect park resources. 36 CFR § 1.6 (a)

(69) Anglers 16 years of age or older must purchase and possess a Yellowstone National Park fishing permit to fish in the park. The permit is valid only when signed by the permittee and is non-transferable. 36 CFR § 1.6 (a)

(70) Anglers under 15 years of age have two options: Children 15 or younger may fish without a permit if they are fishing under the direct supervision of an adult who has a valid park fishing permit. 36 CFR § 1.6 (a) Children 15 or younger may obtain a free permit that must be signed by a responsible adult; with this permit, a child can fish without direct adult supervision. 36 CFR § 1.6 (a), 1.5 (a)(3)

The Superintendent has determined that these use prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection and to assist in fisheries management.

Transport Carcasses/Animal Parts

(71) As authorized in section 2.2(d), freshly harvested game animal carcasses or animal parts may be transported through the park on park roads between any two of the five Entrance Station as part of the thru routes connecting the National Highway System, in or on a motor vehicle when the carcass is field dressed and wrapped or otherwise covered so as to not be visible, and when accompanied by a park transport permit and a marked, valid state tag as evidence that the animal was taken legally outside the park. All carcasses, shed antlers, horns, skulls, bones and other wildlife parts require a park transport permit issued at the point of entry at one of the five Entrance Stations in the park (North, Northeast, East, South, and West Entrances). A transport permit is not required for US-191. Carcass(es) must be transported in the most direct route between the entering gate and exiting gate and are not allowed overnight in the park. No transport of animal carcasses or animal parts is allowed on Old Yellowstone Trail.

The transport of heads and spinal cords from deer, elk, or moose through the park is prohibited if they were harvested in a state or province with chronic wasting disease (CWD) diagnosed in their wildlife populations, except for the following portions of the carcass:

  • Meat that is cut and wrapped either commercially or privately.
  • Quarters or other portions of meat with no part of the spinal column or head attached.
  • Meat that has been boned out.
  • Hides with no heads attached.
  • Clean (no meat or tissue attached) skull plates with antlers attached.
  • Antlers with no meat or tissue attached.
  • Upper canine teeth, also known as “buglers”, “whistlers”, or “ivories”.
  • Finished taxidermy heads.

Currently those states and provinces include Arkansas, Colorado, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New Mexico, New York, North Dakota, Ohio (hunting preserve), Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin, Wyoming, Alberta and Saskatchewan. 36 CFR § 1.6 (a), § 1.5 (a)(2)

(72) Game animals or animal parts may not be transported through backcountry areas or on backcountry trails anywhere in the park; with the exception of the Mountain Creek trail when a permit has been issued. 36 CFR § 1.6 (a)

The Superintendent has determined that these use prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

Transport Vegetation

Transporting or hauling plant products, plant by-products and plant waste products into or through the park is prohibited, except that securely wrapped State certified weed free hay or hay pellets, hay cubes or grain may be transported or used when permitted by the Superintendent. Securely wrapped or covered uncertified hay may be transported on the park portion of US Highway 191(mile post 11-31). 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

The Superintendent has determined that these use prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection and to assist in managing invasive species and noxious weeds.

36 CFR Part 2: Resource Protection, Public Use & Recreation

36 CFR § 2.1: Preservation of Natural, Cultural & Archaeological Resources

(74) Dead wood on the ground may be gathered for use as fuel for campfires at designated backcountry and frontcountry campsites unless prohibited by on-site signs or specific permit restrictions. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

(75) Leaving a designated trail or walkway to shortcut between portions of the same trail or walkway, or to shortcut to an adjacent trail or walkway is prohibited. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2), 36 CFR § 2.1 (b)

(76) Edible berries and mushrooms may be gathered by hand for personal daily consumption within the park boundaries. Gathering edible berries and/or mushrooms within the park for the purposes of preserving (freezing) and/or canning are prohibited. 36 CFR § 2.1 (c)(1)

The Superintendent has determined that these use prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

36 CFR § 2.2: Wildlife Protection

(77) The use of wildlife and/or varmint calls, audio attractants or other artificial or natural means of attracting or disturbing wildlife (including rattling antlers or verbal bugling or howling imitations) are prohibited. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

(78) Viewing wildlife at night with any artificial light, including flash photography, within the exterior boundaries of Yellowstone National Park is prohibited. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2), 36 CFR § 2.2 (e)

The Superintendent has determined that these use prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection and to assist in wildlife management.

36 CFR § 2.10: Camping & Food Storage

Camping conditions

(79) Camping in all Class A and B campgrounds is limited to no more than six persons sleeping per site. All vehicles must be parked on the campsite parking pad so as to not block or restrict traffic on loops, access roads or main roads. 36 CFR § 2.10(a)

(80) The intensive Public Use Season Limits (July 1 to Labor Day) established in 7.13 do not apply to the Fishing Bridge RV Park. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(1

(81) Camping in the Fishing Bridge RV Park is restricted to hard sided vehicles only (constructed of solid, non-pliable material). 36 CFR § 2.10 (a)

(82) Backcountry camping shall be restricted to conditions established by the Superintendent as listed on the backcountry permit. Deviations from the permit are allowed only when approved by authorized personnel designated by the Chief Ranger or where immediate safety considerations or other major concerns dictate the change. 36 CFR § 2.10 (a)

(83) Horses and pack animals are prohibited in Class A and B campgrounds and other frontcountry trails and visitor areas. The use of horses by patrol rangers and for other administrative purposes is allowed. 36 CFR § 2.10 (a)

(84) Concessions permittees operating in the backcountry must suspend all food, garbage, stock feed, cooking utensils and stoves (except clean and sanitized utensils and stoves), ice chests and any scented articles at least 10 feet off the ground and at least 4 feet from tree trunks at night and/or when not in use or attended – unless using approved containers (see compendium #88). 36 CFR § 2.10 (a)

(85) In all areas, food, garbage, and equipment used to cook or store food, when not in use or attended, must be sealed in a vehicle or camping unit made of solid, non-pliable material or suspended at least 10 feet above the ground and 4 feet horizontally from a post, tree trunk, or other object. 36 CFR § 2.10 (d)

(86) The use of hard bear resistant food canisters, stock panniers and coolers, specifically commercially manufactured for this purpose and approved by the Interagency Grizzly Bear Committee, for personal backcountry food and garbage storage is allowed. Canisters, panniers and coolers must be stored in the food pole area within the core camp; are recommended to be hung when possible, and must be properly functioning in designed condition. Bear resistant canisters, panniers or coolers are not approved for use as stand-alone food storage in front country campgrounds, where food must be stored in hard sided vehicles or provided metal bear boxes. All other food containers in backcountry campsites must be hung where possible per section 87 of this document.. 36 CFR § 2.10 (d)

The Superintendent has determined that these use prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety, resource protection and wildlife management in front and backcountry camping areas.

36 CFR § 2.13: Fires

(87) Open fires are permitted only in designated fire rings, grills, or grates in designated campgrounds, some backcountry campsites and employee residential areas. Self contained gas and charcoal grills are allowed. Charcoal must be fully extinguished and disposed of in a garbage receptacle. 36 CFR § 2.13 (a)(1), 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

(88) Wood fires are prohibited at Shoshone Lake backcountry campsites. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(1), 36 CFR § 2.10 (a)

The Superintendent has determined that these use prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection in front and backcountry areas of the park

36 CFR § 2.15: Pets

(89) Pets will not be left unattended in areas or in circumstances that they will create a nuisance to other visitors or cause a conflict with wildlife. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

(90) Pets will not be left in areas where food, water, shade, ventilation and other basic needs are inadequate. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2) 91. Pet owners or responsible persons shall promptly collect and properly dispose of pet fecal matter in appropriate garbage receptacles. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

(92) The owners or responsible persons of pets impounded for running-at-large or as the result of pet abuse, neglect or cruelty will be responsible for any charges incurred resulting from kenneling or boarding, in addition to veterinarian fees, transportation and disposal as needed. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

(93) Domesticated wild or agricultural animals are prohibited unless the owner has a permit issued by the Superintendent and provided that such animals pose no threat to natural or cultural resources. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

The Superintendent has determined that these use prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection and to protect wildlife, pets and other domestic animals

36 CFR § 2.16: Horse & Pack Animals

(94) Stock parties shall include no more than 25 animals, or fewer, when restricted by permit conditions. 36 CFR § 1.6 (a)

(95) Only certified weed-free pellets, cubes and/or grain, but no hay, may be taken into and used in the backcountry. Certified weed-free hay, securely wrapped, may be transported through the park for use outside the park when a permit has been obtained from the Superintendent. Securely wrapped or covered uncertified hay may be transported through the park portion of US Highway 191(mile post 11-31). 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2), 36 CFR § 1.6(a)

(96) Corrals and drift fences are prohibited. Portable electric fences are allowed but should be moved as often as necessary to prevent resource damage and impact. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

(97) Saddle stock parties may travel off-trail except where off-trail travel is prohibited. Pack animals are not allowed off-trail unless no other access is available to a designated camp area. Such off-trail travel routes with pack animals will be specified on the backcountry permit. One support pack animal is allowed for off-trail day trips. A list of areas closed to stock off-trail travel will be available from the Superintendent's office. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

(98) Tying stock to any feature resulting in injury or damage to the feature, or vegetation or soil is prohibited. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

(99) Picketed animals shall not be kept w/in 100 feet of trails, campsites or water sources. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

(100) Picket pins may be made from dead down wood on site or packed in. Picket pin sites must be moved frequently to prevent overgrazing or other damage to vegetation and the pins pulled from the ground before leaving the campsite. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

(101) All stock manure must be scattered and removed at least 100 ft radius from the core camp and hitching line areas. Stock manure must be scattered in any area(s) where stock are retained, and an effort must be made to scatter manure in other grazing areas. Excess manure must be also be removed from trailhead parking and loading areas. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

(102) Lost or dead stock animals within park boundaries will be reported as soon as possible to park rangers. If an animal dies within the park, it will be the owner or responsible person's responsibility to remove the carcass from the park or make arrangements for its proper disposal in a timely manner. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

The Superintendent has determined that these stock use prohibitions, guidelines and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection and to protect wildlife and domestic animals

Coggins Test Requirement

(103) Upon request, all stock users must submit valid proof of a negative Coggins test performed within the last 12 months. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

The Superintendent has determined that this stock requirement is necessary for public safety and protection of park & public stock

36 CFR § 2.19: Winter Activities

(104) Skiing and snowshoeing are permitted on those park roads closed seasonally to wheeled vehicles (as described in sub-section 1.5(a) of this document). Persons on skis or snowshoes shall use ski trails or designated ski areas where provided along roadways. Where these trails or areas are not provided, skiers and snowshoers should travel on the edge of the roadway and yield the right of way to oversnow vehicles. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

(105) The frozen surfaces of Yellowstone and Lewis Lakes are designated as being appropriate for “Kite-skiing”. “Kite-skiing” will be allowed once the park has opened to the public for the winter season AND when the lakes have completely frozen over. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

The Superintendent has determined that these use restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection and to protect wildlife, view sheds and wilderness character.

36 CFR § 2.20: Skating, Skateboards & Similar Devices

(106) The use of roller skates, skateboards, roller skis, roller blades or similar devices are permitted only in NPS housing and administrative areas. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

(107)The above activities may occur on the section of the Grand Loop Road between Mammoth Hot Springs and West Yellowstone which may be open after the November closure and prior to the April wheeled vehicle road opening in conjunction with administrative vehicular travel. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

The Superintendent has determined that these use allowances are appropriate for the public and park residents and do not adversely affect park resources.

36 CFR § 2.21: Smoking

Smoking is prohibited in the following locations:

(108) All thermal areas. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

(109) All posted and designated areas, all government vehicles, and non-residential government buildings. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

(110) The grounds associated with the Mammoth Community Center. (Defined in the YOP). 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

The Superintendent has determined that these use prohibitions are necessary for public safety and resource protection and to protect the health of park visitors and staff.

36 CFR § 2.34: Disorderly Conduct

(111) Nude swimming, nude bathing or nude sun bathing is prohibited in areas frequented by or in the presence of park visitors. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

The Superintendent has determined that this prohibitions and restriction is necessary for public safety

36 CFR § 2.35: Alcoholic Beverages & Controlled Substances

(112) The possession of open containers or consumption of alcoholic beverages is prohibited in that part of Yellowstone National Park which lies north of the line from the mouth of the Gardner River directly to the fence bordering the south side of Park (aka Front) Street proximal to Gardiner, MT, and west to where that fence meets the stone wall of the Roosevelt Arch, then along said wall to its western terminus, and from there directly north to the park boundary. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

(113) The possession or use of alcoholic beverages in the Mammoth Little People's Learning Center is prohibited. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

The Superintendent has determined that these use prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety.

36 CFR § 2.61: Residing on Federal Lands

(114) Residing in the park is restricted to government, concession or contract employees and their families and is pursuant to approval by the Superintendent. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a) (2)

The Superintendent has determined that this use prohibition and restriction is necessary for public safety and resource protection.

36 CFR Part 3: Boating & Water Use Activities

36 CFR § 3.1: Applicable Regulations:

(115) In addition to the laws, rules and regulations found in the U.S. Criminal Code and Code of Federal Regulations, Yellowstone National Park publishes boating regulations each year. The rules and regulations found in the “Yellowstone National Park Boating Regulations” are hereby adopted as part of this Compendium and all persons inside the Park are subject to abiding by the published boating rules and regulations. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

The Superintendent has determined that this requirement is necessary for public safety and resource protection and to protect wildlife and fisheries.

36 CFR Part 4: Vehicles & Traffic Safety

36 CFR § 4.10: Travel on Park Roads & Designated Routes

(116) Off road travel by any motorized wheeled vehicle or mechanical means of conveyance, beyond the roadway berm, or one vehicle width from the edge of established roadways is prohibited. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

The Superintendent has determined that this use prohibition is necessary for public safety and resource protection of native vegetation and wildlife.

36 CFR § 4.21: Speed Limits

(117) As authorized by the Superintendent the speed limit on U.S. Highway 191, within the boundaries of Yellowstone National Park (MP 11-31), shall be 55 miles per hour. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2), 36 CFR § 4.21 (b)

The Superintendent has determined that this restriction is necessary to reduce wildlife mortality and enhance public safety.

36 CFR § 4.31: Hitchhiking

(118) Hitchhiking or soliciting transportation shall be permitted within Yellowstone National Park except:

  • Within two tenths of a mile (0.2mi) of an Entrance Station.
  • Within 200 feet of a school, concession business or park service office building or visitor center.
  • In a residential area where signs exist establishing the area as residential areas only and discouraging public traffic.
  • While holding or having a sign which is larger than 2’ by 2’ in size.
  • The hitchhiker must stay off of the paved surface of the roadway, though a hitchhiker may stand on pavement if clearly in a paved pullout.
  • Where vehicles may not safely pull off of the main traffic lane into a pullout or safely onto the shoulder to allow for the passengers to be received safely.
  • During the hours of darkness unless hitchhiker is wearing bright (preferably reflectively enhanced) clothing.
  • While under the influence of alcohol or intoxicating drugs.
  • When hitch hiking behavior is deemed unsafe or a nuisance by Park Staff. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a) (2), 36 CFR § 4.31

The Superintendent has determined that these restrictions are necessary for public safety, but also acknowledges the allowance to accommodate the needs of park users and staff given the lack of a public transportation system and distances between locations in the park

36 CFR Part 5: Commercial & Private Operations

36 CFR § - 5.13 Nuisances

(119) Allowing vehicles with diesel engines or any vehicle which produces noxious exhaust to idle, except while actively loading or unloading passengers, is prohibited. This does not preclude vehicles from reasonable warm-up times away from concentrated visitor use or residential areas. In developed areas or parking areas, loading or unloading passengers, engine warm-up or idling is limited to 10 minutes. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a) (2)

The Superintendent has determined that these use prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection because idling diesel engines produce noise and noxious fumes, which adversely affect visitor health and visitor experience. These restrictions protect and enhance visitor experience, promote better air quality, and yet enable bus operators to heat and cool bus interiors for passenger comfort.

36 CFR Part 7: Special Regulations

36 CFR Part 7.13: Special Regulations

Commercial Vehicle Special Permits, Terms and Conditions

(120) Permits are valid for business or commercial travel when the following types and sizes of vehicles are utilized: passenger cars, trucks, sports utility vehicles, or vans which are 1 ton or smaller.

  • No trailers of any size or type may be hauled for commercial or business purpose.
  • Permit must be carried within the vehicle and displayed upon request.
  • A permit is required: A permit issued specifically for business or commercial travel is required. Traveling without a specific permit is prohibited under 36 CFR 7.13(a)(5).
  • Other park passes including, but not limited to Annual Area Passes, Golden Age, National Park Passes are not valid for any business or commercial travel
  • Possession or hauling any natural resources including, but not limited to animal parts, fish, or antlers are managed under other park regulation and law (36 CFR 2.1 and 2.2). This permit does NOT permit the hauling of any natural resources.
  • Firearms, weapons, flammable, or any other hazardous material are NOT permitted under this authority.
  • Permit does NOT infer any special privileges. Violating any law, regulation, or rule is still prohibited. 36 CFR § 1.6 (a)

The superintendent has determined that the allowance of some commercial traffic is necessary to protect park resources. CFR regulations require that vehicles including trucks, station wagons, pickups, passenger cars, or other vehicles in conjunction with any commercial or business travel be restricted from utilizing park roads. Although other roads are available to these vehicles, traveling through the park significantly reduces the distance. Travel on park roadways is restricted to prevent impacts to park visitors and resources.

Pursuant to § 1.6 and 7.13(4) the intent of this compendium order is to allow limited use of park roads by vehicles for commercial and business travel for a period of up to three years. By issuing a special use permits and limiting the size of the vehicles, the intent of protecting park resources and maximizing visitor experience may still be achieved. The park will evaluate the impacts during the three year temporary period to ensure that park resources and visitor experience are not impacted

This order in no way seeks to alter regulations that prohibit commercial travel by any vehicles other than those specified here. Transporting natural resources such as antlers or animal parts would still be prohibited whether for commercial or personal purposes. Likewise the use of the park roads by vehicles larger than one ton or those pulling any size trailer would still be prohibited for commercial or business travel.

Park passes including but not limited to Annual Park Pass, Golden Age, and National Park Passes do not permit entry under this authority. Operating without a special use pass specifically intended for this type of travel is prohibited under 7.13(5). Violating any term or condition of the pass is also prohibited under 7.13 (5).

This order would allow a legal means for employees who may be working or traveling for business purposes to pass through the park in either a smaller passenger vehicle or pickup truck.

Molly Islands

(121) Disturbing birds on the Molly Islands in the Southeast Arm of Yellowstone Lake is prohibited. Unauthorized vessels shall not approach within one-half mile of the shoreline of the islands. See notes under “determinations of effect”. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a) (2), 36 CFR 7.13 (d)(11)

Per the Superintendent’s determination of effects, Molly Islands – The compendium entry states a restriction of ½ mile approach distance for protection of Pelican Nesting grounds. The CFR entry, 7.13(d)1, indicates a distance of ¼ mile. Unfortunately boaters have historically been unable to accurately measure the restricted distance. With the ½ mile restriction, the actual ¼ mile protective distance is maintained and consequently the resource is protected. Violation notices should not be issued unless the vessel is within the ¼ mile distance as defined by the CFR.

Removal of vessels

(122) Between May 1 & November 1, vessels and related equipment may be left only in designated mooring slips or parking areas specified by the Superintendent. 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2), 36 CFR § 7.13 (d)(2)

The Superintendent has determined that these use prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

Employee vehicle permits

(123) Employee motor vehicle permits are valid only while the person is employed within the park and must be surrendered upon termination of employment. Vehicles must be registered and permits affixed to the vehicle within seven days of bringing a vehicle into the park. 36 CFR § 7.13 (b)(1)

The Superintendent has determined that these use prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

Fishing Regulations

(124) In addition to the laws, rules and regulations found in the U.S. Criminal Code and Code of Federal Regulations, Yellowstone National Park publishes fishing regulation each year. The rules and regulations found in the “Yellowstone National Park Fishing Guide” are hereby adopted as part of this Compendium and all persons inside the Park are subject to abiding by the published fishing rules and regulations. 36 CFR 7.13 (e)(2), 36 CFR § 1.5 (a)(2)

The Superintendent has determined that these use prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection of fisheries and wildlife.

Hazardous materials transport

(125) A permit is required to transport placarded hazardous materials on park roads. 36 CFR § 7.13 (a)(2), 36 CFR § 1.6 (a) >

The Superintendent has determined that this use requirement is necessary for public safety and to protect responders to an accident scene.

Appendix A

Designated area for Public Assemblies, Meetings and the Sale & Distribution of Printed Matter

The specific First Amendment demonstration areas are further defined on individual maps of the locations listed below. Request individual maps by contacting the Visitor Services Office at (307) 344-2115.

Canyon:
Canyon Village parking lot; Uncle Tom’s (Upper Falls)

Fishing Bridge:
Visitor Center parking lot

Lake:
Lake Hotel parking lot

Madison:
Museum parking lot

Mammoth:
South of Visitor Center

Old Faithful:
Old Faithful developed area

Tower Fall:
Parking lot

West Thumb:
Geyser Basin parking lot

Last updated: May 8, 2018

Contact the Park

Mailing Address:

PO Box 168
Yellowstone National Park, WY 82190-0168

Phone:

307-344-7381

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