Superintendent's Compendium

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The Superintendent’s Compendium is the summary of park specific rules implemented under Title 36 Code of Federal Regulations (36 CFR). It serves as public notice, identifies areas closed for public use, provides a list of activities requiring a special use permit or reservation, and elaborates on public use and resource protection regulations pertaining specifically to the administration of Yellowstone National Park.
 

Introduction to the Superintendent's Compendium

a) Superintendent Compendium Described

The Superintendent’s Compendium does not repeat regulations found in Title 36 Code of Federal Regulations (36 CFR), United States Code and other CFR Titles, which are enforced without further elaboration at the park level. The Superintendent’s Compendium is the summary of park specific rules implemented under 36 CFR. It serves as public notice, identifies areas closed for public use, provides a list of activities requiring either a special use permit or reservation, and elaborates on public use and resource protection regulations pertaining specifically to the administration of the park.

The regulations contained in 36 CFR, Parts 1-7, are the basic mechanism used by the National Park Service (NPS) to preserve and protect the natural and cultural resources of the park and to protect visitors and property within the park. Parts 1 through 6 are general regulations applicable to all areas of the National Park system, and Part 7 contains special regulations specific to individual parks. Each of these Parts has many sections and subsections articulating specific provisions. Within some of these Part 1-7 sections and subsections, the Superintendent is granted discretionary authority to develop local rules to be responsive to the needs of a specific park resource or activity, park plan, program, and/or special needs of the general public.

This Compendium should be used in conjunction with Title 36 CFR, Parts 1-7, to more fully understand the regulations governing the use and enjoyment of all the areas of the National Park System. A copy of Title 36, CFR, can be purchased from the U.S. Government Printing Office or found on the Internet.

b) Laws and Policies Allowing the Superintendent to Develop This Compendium

The National Park Service (NPS) is granted broad statutory authority under 54 United States Code (U.S.C.) Section 100101 et.seq. (Omnibus Public Land Management Act of 2009, previously Organic Act of 1916, as amended) to “...regulate the use of the National Park System by means and measures that conform to the fundamental purpose of the System units, which purpose is to conserve the scenery, natural and historic objects, and wild life in the System units and to provide for the enjoyment of the scenery, natural and historic objects, and wild life in such manner and by such means as will leave them unimpaired for the enjoyment of future generations.” [54 U.S.C. Section 100101(a)].

In 1970, Congress amended the NPS Organic Act to clarify its intentions as to the overall mission of the NPS. Through the General Authorities Act of 1970 (16 U.S.C. Sections 1a1-1a8), Congress brought all areas administered by the NPS into one National Park System and directed the NPS to manage all areas under its administration consistent with the Organic Act of 1916.

In 1978, Congress amended the General Authorities Act of 1970 and reasserted System- wide the high standard of protection defined in the original Organic Act by stating “Congress further reaffirms, declares, and directs that the promotion and regulation of the various areas of the National Park System, as defined by Section 1 of this Title, shall be consistent with and founded in the purpose established by Section 1 of this Title, to the common benefit of all people of the United States.”

54 U.S.C. Section 100501 defines the National Park System as”... any area of land and water administered by the Secretary, acting through the Director, for park, monument, historic, parkway, recreational, or other purposes.”

In addition to the above statutory authority, the Superintendent is guided by established NPS policy as found in the NPS Management Policies (2006). The Superintendent is also guided by more specific policies promulgated by the Director, National Park Service, in the form of Director’s Orders. As stated in the Management Policies, the primary responsibility of the NPS is to protect and preserve our national natural and cultural resources while providing for the enjoyment of these resources by visitor and other users, as long as use does not impair specific park resources or overall visitor experience. The appropriateness of any particular visitor use or recreational experience is resource-based and will vary from park to park; therefore, a use or activity that is appropriate in one park area may not be appropriate in another. The Superintendent is directed to analyze overall park use and determine if any particular use is appropriate. Where conflict arises between use and resource protection, where the Superintendent has a reasonable basis to believe a resource is or would become impaired, than that Superintendent is obliged to place limitations on public use.

c) Consistency of This Compendium with Applicable Federal Law and Requirements

The Superintendent’s Compendium is not considered a significant rule requiring review by the Office of Management and Budget under Executive Order 12866. In addition, this Compendium will not have a significant economic effect on a number of small entities nor impose a significant cost on any local, state or tribal government or private organization, and therefore does not fall under the requirements of the Regulatory Flexibility Act or Unfunded Mandates Reform Act.

The actions and requirements described in this Compendium are found to be categorically excluded from further compliance with the procedural requirements of the National Environmental 5 Policy Act (NEPA) in Department of the Interior (DOI) Guidelines 516 DM 6 and as such, an Environmental Assessment will not be prepared.

d) Development of the Requirements of the Superintendent’s Compendium

As outlined above, the NPS has broad authority and responsibility to determine what types of uses and activities are appropriate in any particular National Park System area. The requirements of the Superintendent’s Compendium are developed through an analysis and determination process. The decision criteria used during this process are:

  • Is the use or activity consistent with the NPS Organic Act and NPS policy?
  • Is the use or activity consistent and compatible with the park’s enabling legislation, management objectives, and corresponding management plans?
  • Will the use or activity injure the park’s protected natural and cultural resources and other protected values?
  • Will the use or activity disturb or be in conflict with wildlife, vegetation, and environmental protection actions and values?
  • Will the use or activity conflict with or be incompatible with traditional park uses and activities?
  • Will the use or activity compromise employee or public safety?

e) Applicability of the Compendium

The rules contained in this Compendium apply to all persons entering, using, visiting or otherwise present on federally owned lands, including submerged lands, and waters administered by the NPS within the legislative boundaries of the park. This includes all waters subject to the jurisdiction of the United States, including all navigable waters.

The rules contained in this Compendium shall not be construed to prohibit administrative activities conducted by the National Park Service, or its agents, in accordance with approved general management and resource management plans, or in emergency operations involving threats to life, property, or park resources.

f) Enforcement of Compendium Requirements

NPS Law Enforcement Park Rangers enforce the requirements of the United State Code, 36 CFR, and this Superintendent’s Compendium.

g) Penalties for Not Adhering to the Compendium Requirements

A person who violates any provision of the regulations found in 36 CFR, Parts 1-7, or provisions of this Compendium, is subject to a fine as provided by law (18 U.S.C. 3571) up to $5,000 for individuals and $10,000 for organizations, or by imprisonment not exceeding six months (18 U.S.C. 3559), or both, and shall be adjudged to pay all court costs associated with any court proceedings.

h) Comments on the Compendium

The Compendium is reviewed annually and revised as necessary. The park welcomes comments about its program and activities at any time.

Written comments on the Compendium may be submitted to:

Superintendent
Yellowstone National Park
P.O. Box 168
Yellowstone National Park, WY 82190

i) Effective Date of the Superintendent Compendium

The Superintendent’s Compendium is effective on the approval date listed on the first page of this document.

j) Additional Information

Some of the terms used in this Compendium may have specific meaning defined in 36 CFR 1.4 Definitions.

k) Availability

Copies of the Compendium are available at P.O. Box 168, Yellowstone National Park, WY 82190.

 

Section I: 36 CFR § 1.2 Applicability and Scope

(d) Grizzly Bear Management: The administrative activities conducted by Yellowstone National Park, or its agents, relative to the management and handling of grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) and their habitat, will be in accordance with guidelines, procedures, and rules described in the "Final Environmental Impact Statement, Grizzly Bear Management Program" and "Yellowstone National Park Annual Bear Management Plan," and, upon de-listing of the species from Threatened Status by the US Fish and Wildlife Service, in accordance with the "Conservation Strategy for the Grizzly Bear in the Greater Yellowstone Area."

 

Section II: 36 CFR §1.4 What Terms Do I Need to Know?

In addition to definitions found in 36 CFR § 1.4(a), the following definitions, created by the Superintendent, apply to all parts of this Compendium for park wide consistency:

Administrative travel means roads closed to motor vehicle or oversnow use by the public but are open to motor vehicle or oversnow use for administrative purposes.

Artificial fly means a hook, in which a minimum of half the shank of the hook is dressed with conventional, natural, or synthetic material in a common method known as fly tying. This includes dry flies, wet flies, streamers, egg patterns, and nymphs. Hair, feathers, metallic colored tape, tinsel, mylar, bead eyes, dumbbell eyes, beads (metal, glass or plastic), foam, rubber and lead-free metal wire, tape or body wrap may be used as an integral part of the design and fly pattern.

Artificial light means any man-made light or lightning device.

Artificial lure means a man-made or artificial device, complete with a hook, intended to attract and entice a fish for the purpose of taking them; excludes artificial flies and attractors.

Attractor means a hook-less device attached to a fishing line between the end of a rod and an artificial fly or artificial lure or that provides additional motion or other visual attraction. Typical attractors include, but are not limited to, dodgers, lake trolls (such as Ford fenders), willow leaf, or cowbell flashers, artificial rubber or molded plastic (soft or hard beads). A strike indicator is not considered an attractor.

Bait means all dead or live organisms or edible parts thereof; natural or artificial food or products thereof; chemically treated or processed fish eggs or animal products; artificial dough, paste or edible lures; and rubber worms, rubber leeches, or twister tails. This definition does not apply to hair or feathers used as fly-tying material.

Barbless hook means a hook manufactured without a barb or a hook on which barbs have been filed off, closed (point of the barb has been crimped or pinched so the barb touches the hook shank), or has otherwise been completely removed.

Bear Spray means a chemical formula designed specifically to deter aggressive or attacking bears. It must be registered with the Environmental Protection Agency and individual states. It must be commercially manufactured and labeled as “Bear Spray”. Bear spray must contain between 1% to 2% of the active ingredients capsaicin and related capsaicinoids.

Bear resistant food container (BRFC) means an item constructed of a solid, non-pliable material to prevent access by a bear. BRFCs allowed include personal backpacking canisters, stock panniers and coolers approved and listed by the Interagency Grizzly Bear Committee (http://www.igbconline.org/html/safety.html).

Boiling River Swimming Area means the water 25 yards upstream and downstream of where Boiling River drains into Gardner River. Terrain within 50 yards of water and the trail that access the area is also included as part of the swimming area.

Catch and release means a fish must be carefully and immediately returned alive to the water from which it was taken.

Class A Campground means campground with flush toilets and running water.

Class B Campground means campground with vault toilets and water pumps.

Closely attended means a person fishing must be able to immediately control their line or rod at all times in order to react to a potential strike.

Coggins test means blood test which identifies Equine Infectious Anemia which is caused by a viral infection that affects the immune system of equine species. Equine species are horses, burros and mules but not llamas.

Core camp means the area within a 100 foot radius of an NPS established fire ring or cooking area of a designated campsite.

Drainage means the stream proper and area of land which includes all streams, lakes and tributaries that drain into that stream.

Dropper or drop fly means an artificial fly being used as a second artificial fly on a two (2) artificial fly rig. A dropper is commonly attached to a primary fishing line or artificial fly by means of tippet or other fishing line.

Drug free school zone means that area within a radius of 1,000 feet of the Snoopy School/Mammoth Community Center, the Mammoth Little People's Learning Center and the NPS lands adjacent to the Gardiner public school. (21 USC 860)

E-bike means a two- or three-wheeled cycle with fully operable pedals and an electric motor of less than 750 watts (1 hp).

Fly fishing means only artificial flies may be attached to a line for the purpose of attracting and enticing fish for take, regardless of the type of rod or line used; weights or split shot and strike indicators are permitted.

Firehole Swimming Area means the section of Firehole River, approximately 2 miles south of Madison Junction adjacent to Firehole Canyon Drive, that is comprised of flat, calm water starting upstream at whitewater rapids situated between narrow cliffs and ending approximately 250 yards downstream where the flat, calm section of water becomes narrow and whitewater again. Terrain within 25 yards of the water and the trail that access the area is also included as part of the swimming area.

Hook means a bent wire device for catching fish to which a single, double or treble point is attached to a single shank. Hooks can be:

  1. Single Point with only one point.
  2. Double Point with two points on a common shank.
  3. Treble Point with three points on a common shank.

Invasive (nonnative) species means a species that does not naturally occur or is alien to the ecosystem under consideration and causes, or is likely to cause, economic or environmental harm or harm to human health. Invasive species can be plants, animals, and other organisms (e.g. microbes).

Lake means a body of standing water in a depression of land and includes reservoirs and ponds (excluding ponds created by beavers).

Pack animal means horses, burros, mules, ponies and llamas only.

Service animal means any dog or miniature horse that is individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including a physical, sensory, psychiatric, intellectual, or other mental disability.

Scented attractants means any substance that has been added, infused or applied to an artificial fly, artificial lure, line, or hook for the purpose of attracting fish by scent; excludes non-scented materials or chemicals specifically designed and produced to cause flies to float or sink.

Snagging means taking or attempting to take a fish by the use of an artificial fly or artificial lure in any manner or method that the fish does not voluntarily take the hook in its mouth. Fishing only by means of a bare hook that is not an artificial fly or artificial lure, regardless of manner or method, is considered snagging.

Stream means water in a permanent or seasonal bed or channel with a current that is usually continuous in one direction and includes creeks, rivers, ditches, sloughs and ponds created by beavers. Streams may not flow continuously during low-flow periods. Ponds or puddles in a stream channel during low-flow periods shall be considered to be a stream.

Strike Indicator means a hook-less, unscented floating device attached to a line or leader to signal a strike at an artificial fly or artificial lure.

Thermal area means any area where surface manifestations of hot springs, geysers, mud springs, fumaroles or warm ground are present.

Tributary means a stream that flows into a larger stream, river or lake.

Unmanned Aircraft means a device that is used or intended to be used for flight in the air without the possibility of direct human intervention from within or on the device, and the associated operational elements and components that are required for the pilot or system operator in command to operate or control the device (such as cameras, sensors, communication links). This term includes all types of devices that meet this definition (e.g., model airplanes, quadcopters, and drones) that are used for any purpose, including for recreation or commerce.

Upgrading means the practice of substituting captured fish for fish in possession.

Yellowstone Native Fish Species means a species that is endemic or indigenous to Yellowstone National Park. This includes, but is not limited to:

  1. Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout
  2. Westslope Cutthroat Trout
  3. Mountain Whitefish
  4. Arctic Grayling

Yellowstone Native Trout Conservation Area means all lakes, streams and tributaries within Yellowstone National Park that are outside the Nonnative Trout Tolerance Area.

Yellowstone Nonnative Trout Tolerance Area means the Firehole River and its tributaries; the Gibbon River, downstream of Gibbon Falls, and its tributaries; Lewis Lake and its tributaries; the Lewis River, above Lewis Falls, and its tributaries; Shoshone Lake and its tributaries; and the Madison River and its tributaries.

 

Section III: 36 CFR §1.5 Visiting Hours, Public Use Limits & Closures, and Area Designations for Specific Use or Activities

(a)(1) Establish, for all or a portion of a park area, a reasonable schedule of visiting hours, impose public use limits, or close all or a portion of a park area to all public use or to a specific use or activity.

SC 1. All caves within the park are closed to public use, except when a permit has been issued by the Superintendent.

Determination: This public use limit has been established in accordance with the Federal Cave Resource Protection Act of 1988 and departmental policy, which states all caves located on NPS lands are “significant caves.” The permit requirement is done to protect sensitive cave resources and provides a protection for the public from potentially accessing areas with concentrated toxic gas.

SC 2. All firearm ranges, to include the administrative roads that accesses them, are closed to public access.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined this closure is necessary for public and employee safety, as well as resource protection.

SC 3. Bear Management Areas (BMA).

(a) Unless otherwise specified below, the following areas will be closed to all public access for bear management activities during their prescribed dates:
(1) Firehole BMA.
(i) Area (includes Firehole Freight Road and Firehole Lake Road) is closed March 10 through the Friday of Memorial Day weekend. The Mary Mountain Trail from the Nez Perce trailhead to Mary Lake is closed March 10 through June 15. Through travel from the Canyon trailhead is not allowed, however, travel is allowed from the Canyon trailhead to Mary Lake and back. Streamside use is allowed from the point where Nez Perce Creek crosses the main road to a point one mile upstream along Nez Perce Creek.
(2) Richard’s Pond BMA.
(i) Area is closed March 10 through the Friday of Memorial Day weekend. From the Saturday of Memorial Day weekend through September 30, Duck Creek, from the park boundary upstream to the Campanula Creek/Richards Creek fork, is open to streamside travel. The area upstream from Campanula Creek/Richard's Creek fork is closed from March 10 through September 30.
(3) Gneiss Creek BMA.
(i) Area is closed March 10 through June 30. From July 1 through November 10, travel is allowed only on designated trails (off-trail travel is prohibited).
(4) Gallatin BMA.
(i) From May 1 through November 10, travel is allowed only on designated trails (off-trail travel is prohibited).
(5) Blacktail BMA.
(i) Area is closed March 10 through June 30.
(6) Washburn BMA.
(i) Area is closed August 1 through November 10. From March 10 through July 31, the area is open by special permit only. Contact the Tower Ranger Station or Bear Management Office for permit information.
(7) Antelope BMA.
(i) Area is closed March 10 through November 10. The Dunraven Road and related turnouts are open. From May 25 through November 10, foot travel is allowed on the old Road Trail from Tower Falls Campground to the Buffalo Picnic Area.
(8) Mirror Plateau BMA.
(i) From May 15 through November 10, the area is open to day use only with the exception that from July 1 through August 14 overnight camping is permitted for a combined total of 14 nights per summer at the 3O1 and 5P7 campsites.
(9) Pelican Valley BMA.
(i) Area is closed April 1 through July 3. From July 4 through November 10, the area is open to day-use only between the hours of 9 a.m. and 7 p.m.
(10) Clear Creek BMA.
(i) Area J1 - From April 1 through August 10, travel is only allowed on the east shore from Nine-mile trailhead to Park Point. All campsites and all other trails are closed and off-trail travel is prohibited. On August 11, all campsites and trails open and off-trail travel is permitted.

(ii) Area J2 - From April 1 through July 14, travel is allowed only on the east shore trail from Park Point to Beaverdam Creek. All other trails are closed and off-trail travel is prohibited. Open campsites are 5E3, 5E4, 5E6, and 5E8 (no travel away from campsite). All other campsites are closed. On July 15, all campsites and trails open and off-trail travel is permitted.
(11) Lake Spawn BMA.
(i) From May 15 through July 14, no off-trail travel is allowed and the trail between Cabin Creek and Outlet Creek is closed. Open Campsites are 7L5, 7L6, 7L7, 7M3, 7M4, 6A3, and 6B1 (no travel away from campsite). All other campsites are closed. On July 15 all campsites and trails open and off trail-travel are permitted.
(12) Two Ocean BMA.
(i) From March 10 through July 14 and August 22 through November 10, travel is allowed only on designated trails (off-trail travel is prohibited). From July 15 through August 21, a permit is required for persons wishing to travel away from designated trails.
(13) Riddle and Solution BMA.
(i) Area is closed April 30 through July 14.
(14) Grant Village BMA.
(i) Campground opens June 20 or earlier if bear use of the area spawning streams is over prior to that time. If bears are still frequenting the spawning streams after June 20, the campground loops adjacent to the stream(s) will remain closed until bear activity ceases. Campground closes October 16.
(15) Heart Lake BMA.
(i) Is closed to all public access Area is closed April 1 through June 30.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined these closures are necessary for the protection and repopulation of Grizzly Bears in Yellowstone National Park and the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem.

SC 4. Bird nesting closures.

(a) Annually, from April 1st to September 15th, all lands within ¼ mile or any other distance designated on signs or maps of active sensitive bird nesting sites are closed to all public access.

(b) The following locations are known, reoccurring nesting sites that close in accordance with section (a):
(1) Beula Lake.

(2) Campsite 7L7, South Arm of Yellowstone Lake.

(3) Frank Island, except the picnic area.

(4) Peale Island.

(5) Stevenson Island.

(6) The Mouth of the Lewis Channel.

(7) Tananger Lake.

(8) Heart Lake.

(9) Riddle Lake.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that this closure is necessary for the protection of bird species during the sensitive nesting period and that a ¼ mile distance is reasonable considering U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service guidance. Should documentation of fledging or nesting failure occur earlier than September 15th, closures may be lifted by the removal of posted signs.

SC 5. Construction or demolition areas are closed to public access except where a designated route and means of travel has been established by the Superintendent.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined this closure is necessary for public and employee safety, as well as resource protection.

SC 6. Jumping, diving, or rappelling off any bridge structure in the park is prohibited.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that this prohibition is necessary for public and traffic safety.

SC 7. Launching, landing, or operating an unmanned aircraft from or on lands and waters administered by the National Park service within Yellowstone National Park is prohibited except as approved in writing by the Superintendent.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that unmanaged or unrestricted recreational use of unmanned aircraft within Yellowstone National Park will conflict with, or impact, a variety of park uses including visitor experience of unimpaired view sheds; the disturbance, displacement or harassment of park wildlife to include threatened and endangered species present potential for impacts or damage to sensitive thermal areas; creation of public safety hazards per operation near roadways or large aggregations of visitors, and visual or aural impacts to wilderness character and values within the park backcountry. Less restrictive measures were not considered sufficient due to the rapidly expanding and evolving use of UAs throughout the world. Section 1.5 of NPS Management Policies 2006 provide that a new form of park use may be allowed within a park only after a determination has been made by the park Superintendent that it will not result in unacceptable impacts on park resources and values.

SC 8. Obsidian Cliff.

(a) For the purposes of this part, “Obsidian Cliff” means all areas within the following exterior boundary: a straight line from 44°50’55.00” N, 110°44’07.94” to the peak of Horseshoe Hill; a straight line from the peak of Horseshoe Hill to the west bank of Solfatara Creek; along the western bank of Solfatara Creek to its intersection with the Solfatara Creek trail; 100 feet off the north edge of Solfatara Creek Trail to Solfatara North trailhead; 100 feet off the east edge of Grand Loop Road to 44°50’55.00”N, 110°44’07.94”.
(b) Obsidian Cliff is closed to all public access.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined this closure is necessary to provide for the protection of cultural resources associated with Obsidian Cliff National Historic Landmark. The values associated with Obsidian Cliff are still strong today, making recreational activities at the site inappropriate.

SC 9. Road Closures

(a) Government areas, administrative roads and service roads are closed to public motor vehicle use.

(b) Firehole Canyon Drive is closed to wheeled buses, trailers and recreational vehicles.

(c) Starting the first Monday in November until spring opening in April or May, Grand Loop Road and park entrance roads are closed to motor vehicle use by the public, except for the following sections of park road which remain open year-round:
(1) North Entrance Station to Mammoth Hot Springs.

(2) Mammoth Hot Springs to Upper Terrace Drive.

(3) Mammoth Hot Springs to Tower Junction.

(4) Tower Junction to the Northeast Entrance Station.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these use prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection. Additionally, Federal Highways has placed a six ton weight limit for the Firehole Lake Drive Bridge.

SC 10. Stephens Creek Administrative Facility.

(a) For the purpose of this part, “Stephens Creek Administrative Facility” means Stephens Creek access road, Stephens Creek corral, Stephens Creek barn and infrastructure, Stephens Creek firearms range, and the terrain 25 to 50 yards around these facilities.

(b) The Stephens Creek Administrative Facility is closed to all public access.

(c) In addition to section (a) and (b), additional temporary closures may be implemented throughout the year in the Stephens Creek Administrative Facility area to accommodate wildlife management operations. All areas within these additional temporary closures are closed to public access.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that this closure is necessary for resource protection, as well as public and employee safety.

SC 11. Sylvan Pass Avalanche Control Area.

(a) For the purposes of this part, “Sylvan Pass Avalanche Control Area” means the entire south aspect of Hoyt Peak, from a point 1.5 miles east of Avalanche Peak Trailhead to a point 1.6 miles east of Avalanche Peak Trailhead.

(b) The Sylvan Pass Avalanche Control Area is closed to all public access.

Determination: The Superintendent has closed this area year round for public safety. Over the winter months, NPS staff conduct avalanche mitigation operations, to include the use of explosive rounds. Regardless of season, the area listed above may contain unexploded ordinances.

SC 12. The Sylvan Pass howitzer platform and administrative road that accesses the platform is closed to public access.

Determination: The Superintendent has closed this area for public safety. Over the winter months, NPS staff conduct avalanche mitigation operations, to include the use of explosive rounds fired off from this location. The tools used to conduct avalanche mitigation in the area are left on site and the nature of the equipment is dangerous.

SC 13. The possession of an agricultural or domesticated wild animal is prohibited unless the Superintendent has provided written authorization.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these use prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

 

(a)(2) Designate areas for a specific use or activity, or impose conditions or restrictions on a use or activity.

Boating and Water Use Activities

SC1. Aquatic invasive species (AIS) inspections.

(a) An AIS inspection, as specified in the sections below, is a prerequisite to obtain a general permit for boating in the park.

(b) AIS inspections will be completed by an authorized inspector from the park on all vessels and related equipment that will contact park waters.

(c) The following are required to obtain an AIS seal:

(1) All vessels and related equipment must be free of AIS upon the completion of an inspection.

(2) If AIS is present on a vessel or related equipment, the contaminated vessel or related equipment will be subject to a 30 day quarantine before another inspection will be completed which is subject to the requirements of this part.

(3) All vessels must not have a ballast tank or similar areas in which cannot be visually inspected, except as specifically authorized by the Superintendent.

Determination: To address the risk of introducing Dreissenid mussels and other (AIS) to Yellowstone National Park waters, the park is developing an AIS Rapid Response Framework and an AIS Management Plan. Meanwhile, for the 2019 boating season only, the Superintendent has determined prohibiting vessels equipped with sealed internal water ballast tanks on all park waters is necessary. The Superintendent established this restriction for the protection of natural resources. Dressenid mussels are a highly invasive species and have caused irreversible changes in waterways in the Midwestern and Eastern United States and in the Colorado River draining, to include Lake Mead and Lake Powell. Sealed internal water ballast tanks pose an elevated risk of accidental transportation and introduction of AIS because they are less likely to completely dry out. In addition, Yellowstone National Park requires an inspection of all watercraft to make sure they are clean, drained and dry, and this is not possible with sealed tanks.

(d) An AIS seal issued in accordance with this part is only valid during the dates specified on the AIS inspection receipt or seal, or until the vessel or related equipment exits the park.

(e) All vessels and related equipment, regardless of a previous inspections or AIS seal issuance, must be re-inspected, in accordance with this part, upon reentry into Yellowstone National Park.

(f) It is prohibited to allow any vessel or related equipment to contact any park waters without a valid AIS inspection or seal as specified in this part.

Determination: A general permit is required to boat in the park, as referenced in 36 CFR §7.13(d)(1)(i). The Superintendent has determined an AIS inspection and sections detailed in this part are necessary to obtain a general permit for boating in the park to prevent the introduction and spread of AIS in Yellowstone National Park waters.

SC2. All bilge and ballast plugs and other barriers that prevent water drainage from a vessel shall be removed or remain open while a vessel is being stored, left unattended, or transported by land within the park.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

SC3. Anchoring a vessel on Yellowstone Lake in the following locations is prohibited:

(a) Bridge Bay Marina.

(b) Grant Village Launch Ramp Lagoon.

(c) Within 300 yards of the shoreline between Lake Hotel and the entrance to Bridge Bay Marina.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

SC4. Anchoring or beaching any vessel overnight in the park is prohibited, except if a person has an active and valid Yellowstone National Park Backcountry Use Permit.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

SC5. Docks on Yellowstone Lake are designated for Yellowstone National Park Backcountry Use Permittees. Persons without a Yellowstone National Park Backcountry Use Permit may only use these docks when the associated backcountry campsite is not in use.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

SC6. It is prohibited to transport a vessel or related equipment that is known to have invasive species attached through the park.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

SC7. Landing or beaching a vessel in the following locations is prohibited:

(a) In or within 25 feet of a geothermal area, except at the designated boat landing area for Shoshone Geyser Basin.

(b) In an area closed to public use.

(c) In areas as designated by signs or as posted on maps in visitor use areas.

(d) On the shoreline of Yellowstone Lake between Little Thumb Creek and the south end of West Thumb Geyser Basin.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

SC8. Power-driven vessels on Yellowstone Lake may be used in areas restricted to hand-propelled vessels if the device that powers the vessel has been completely removed from the transom or is non-operational and completely fixed out of the water.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

SC9. Power-driven vessels from Lewis Lake may be used on Shoshone Lake only if the device that powers the vessel has been removed. Storage requirements for the device are detailed in 36 CFR §2.22(a)(2).

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

SC10. The park’s boating season begins the Saturday immediately prior to Memorial Day and ends the first Sunday in November. Boating outside of these dates is prohibited.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that the use of Bear Spray in a manner consistent with IGBC recommendation is appropriate as a deterrent to negative human/bear encounters.


Resource Protection

SC11. The possession or consumption of food and beverages is prohibited in all thermal areas, except when contained in a pack like container for carrying purposes. Water is not included in this prohibition.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that this restriction is necessary to protect and prevent impact to thermal resources.

SC12. Transporting plants, minerals or products thereof is prohibited on any park road, except for securely wrapped or covered hay on U.S. Highway 191 or if a person has received written authorization from the Superintendent.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

SC13. In lieu of paying a Yellowstone National Park Recreation Fee, Cooke City area residents may obtain a free permit, as authorized by the Superintendent, for non-recreational travel through the park between the north and northeast entrances.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that this restriction is necessary to protect the resource and enhance public safety for public and boating safety.


Wildlife Protection

SC14. The possession of Bear Spray for the strict purposes of protecting life and property against aggressive wildlife is permitted within the park.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that the use of Bear Spray in a manner consistent with IGBC recommendation is appropriate as a deterrent to negative human/bear encounters.

SC15. The use or possession of any radio electronic signal receiving device capable of being set at assigned NPS, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Interagency Bear Management Team or any other permitted wildlife research operation frequencies within Yellowstone National Park is prohibited.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

SC16. To protect park wildlife, the following are prohibited:

(a) Willfully approaching, remaining, viewing or engaging in any activity:
(1) Within 25 yards of any wildlife, except bears and wolves or when completely inside a legally positioned motor vehicle.

(2) Within 100 yards of bears and wolves, except when completely inside a legally positioned motor vehicle.

(3) Within any distance that displaces or interferes with the free unimpeded movement of any wildlife.

(4) Within any distance that creates or contributes to a potentially hazardous condition or situation.

(5) Failing to remove oneself to prescribed distances during inadvertent, accidental or surprise encounters with wildlife.
(b) The prohibitions of this section do not apply to someone who is:
(1) In compliance with written protocols approved by the Superintendent.

(2) In accordance with the terms and conditions of a permit issued by the Superintendent.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these pubic use restrictions and requirements are necessary to maximize public safety, protect wildlife, and provide park stiff with the flexibility to situationally manage dynamic, divers and rapidly evolving wildlife viewing opportunities.

General Park Usage

SC17. Commercial Vehicle Travel Restrictions

(a) Permitted oversize and overweight vehicles are only permitted to travel between 9:00 pm and 9:00 am from the Friday before Memorial Day to September 15th.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

(b) Permitted transportation of combustible or flammable petroleum products in vehicles exceeding 30 feet in length, 8 feet 6 inches in width, 13 feet 6 inches in height and 80,000 pounds of gross weight will be required to travel between 9:00 pm and 12:00 pm from the Friday before Memorial Day through September 15th.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

(c) Permitted transportation of combustible or flammable petroleum products in vehicles not exceeding 30 feet in length, 8 feet 6 inches in width, 13 feet 6 inches in height and 80,000 pounds of gross weight will be allowed to travel between 9:00 pm and 12:00 pm from the Friday before Memorial Day through September 15th.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

SC18. E-bikes are allowed in Yellowstone National Park where traditional bicycles are allowed. E-bikes are prohibited where traditional bicycles are prohibited. Except where use of motor vehicles by the public is allowed, using the electric motor to move an e-bike without pedaling is prohibited.

A person operating an e-bike is subject to the following sections of 36 CFR Part 4 that apply to the use of traditional bicycles: sections 4.12, 4.13, 4.20, 4.21, 4.22, 4.23, and 4.30(h)(2)-(5).

Except as specified in this Compendium, the use of an e-bike within Yellowstone National Park is governed by State Law, which is adopted and made a part of this Compendium. Any violation of State law adopted by this paragraph is prohibited.

Determination: Implementation of the action defined in DOI Policy Memo 19-01. Should future unanticipated impacts regarding public health and safety, natural and cultural resource protection, and / or other management activities and objectives be witnessed as a result of this action, management will reevaluate use and / or activity restrictions.

SC19. Employee motor vehicle permits issued in accordance with 36 CFR §7.13(b)(1) and (2) are only valid while the person is employed within the park and must be surrendered upon termination of employment.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined this condition is necessary for the proper use of the park by those no longer employed within the park.

SC20. Gyroscopically Controlled Mobility Devices

(a) The use of a Segway or other similar gyroscopically controlled device, in lieu of a manual or motorized wheelchair, is allowed by persons with disabilities who would otherwise only have the option of using a manual or power wheel chair under the following conditions:
(1) A person using a Segway or a similar gyroscopically controlled device in the park would be medically determined to have a permanent disability that severely limits one or more major life functions. A permanent disability is a permanent physical, mental, or sensory impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities, such as caring for oneself, performing manual task, walking, seeing, hearing, speaking, breathing, learning and working.

(2) Persons claiming disability will show proof of medically determined permanent disability or eligibility for receiving benefits under federal law following the guidelines in effect for obtaining an America the Beautiful Access Pass (e.g. a statement by a license physician).

(3) Segways or similar gyroscopically controlled devices are permitted on sidewalks, formalized paved overlooks, and in campgrounds.

(4) Segways are prohibited on park roads, to include their shoulders, and boardwalks.

(5) Segways may not be operated at speeds greater than 3 mph.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these use conditions are necessary to ensure public safety and the safety of ADA defined users.

SC21. Idling an engine or motor vehicle is prohibited, except:

(a) While stopped in traffic or a construction line.

(b) While actively loading or unloading passengers.

(c) While warming up a motor vehicle’s engine for no longer than 10 minutes in developed areas or parking lots.

(d) While warming up an engine or motor vehicle away from concentrated visitor use or residential area.

Determination: Idling engines and motor vehicles produce noise and noxious fumes that adversely affect air quality, park resources, and visitor health and experience. The Superintendent has established these conditions to protect park resources, promote better air quality in the park, protect and enhance visitor experience. These conditions have been determined as the least restrictive means to ensure operators can still warm up engines or motor vehicles for optimum use and to heat and cool motor vehicle interiors for passenger comfort without negatively impacting park resources and the public.

SC22. It is prohibited to leave or confine a pet in an unattended motor vehicle under conditions that endanger the health or well-being of a pet due to heat, cold, lack of adequate ventilation, or lack of food or water, or other circumstances that could reasonably be expected to cause suffering, disability, or death to the pet.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

 

Section IV: 36 CFR §1.6 Permits

(a) When authorized by regulations set forth in this chapter, the superintendent may issue a permit to authorize an otherwise prohibited or restricted activity or impose a public use limit.

(f) The following is a compilation of those activities for which a permit from the superintendent is required:

§1.5 Closures and public use limits.

(d) The following activities related to Public Use limits:
  • Non-recreational Cooke City area resident permit.
  • Entering a closed area.
  • Entering any cave.
  • Possession of a domesticated wild or agricultural animal.
  • Transportation of mineral or plant products.
  • Transportation of wildlife parts not associated with lawfully taken wildlife and parts thereof.
§2.2 Wildlife Protection.
(d) Transportation of lawfully taken wildlife and parts through park areas.
(d) Retrieval of wounded or dead wildlife.

§2.4 Weapons, traps and nets.
(e) Carry or possess a weapon, trap, or net that is otherwise not authorized.

§2.5 Research specimens.
(a) Taking plants, fish, wildlife, rocks or minerals for specimen collection.

§2.6 Gathering of plants or plant parts by federally recognized Indian tribes.
(b) Gathering plants or plant parts within a park area by federally recognized Indian tribe.

§2.10 Camping and food storage.

(a) Camping.

§2.12 Audio Disturbances.

(a)(2) Operating a power saw in developed areas.

(a)(3) Operation of any type of portable motor or engine, or device powered by a portable motor or engine in non-developed areas.

(a)(4) Operation of a public address system in connection with a public gathering or special event for which a permit has been issued pursuant to §2.50 or §2.51.

§2.17 Aircraft & Air Delivery.

(a)(3) Delivery or retrieval of a person or object by parachute, helicopter or other airborne means.

§2.37 Soliciting or demanding gifts, money goods or services (pursuant to the terms and conditions of a permit issued under §2.50, §2.51 or §2.52).

§2.38 Explosives.

(a) Using, possessing, storing, or transport explosives, blasting agents, or explosive materials.

(b) Using or possessing fireworks.

§2.50 Special events.

(a) Sports events, pageants, regattas, public spectator attractions, entertainments, ceremonies, and similar events.

§2.51 Demonstrations and designated available park areas.

(a) Demonstrations for groups of 26 or more persons.

§2.52 Sale of printed matter and the distribution of printed matter and other message-bearing items.

(c) Sale and distribution of printed matter and other message-bearing items that is not solely commercial advertising for groups of 26 or more persons.

§2.60 Livestock use and agriculture.

(b) Livestock use.

§2.61 Residing on Federal lands.

(a) Residing on Federal lands.

§2.62 Memorialization.

(b) Scattering of human ashes from cremation.

§3.3 Operation of a vessel in a park area.

§3.12 May I use a vessel to tow a person for water skiing or other similar activities?

(b) Towing a person using a parasail, hang-glider or other airborne device on park waters.

§3.19 Using manned or unmanned submersibles.

§4.11 Load, weight and size limits.

(a) Operation of vehicles exceeding designated load, weight and size limits.

§5.1 Display, posting or distribution of commercial notices or advertisements.

§5.2 Alcoholic beverages; sale of intoxicants.

(b) Sale of alcoholic, spirituous, vinous, or fermented liquor, containing more than 1 percent of alcohol by weight on privately owned lands.

§5.3 Engaging in or soliciting any business.

§5.4 Commercial passenger-carrying motor vehicles.

(a) The commercial transportation of passengers by motor vehicles.

§5.5 Commercial Photography & Filming

(a) Commercial filming of motion pictures or television involving the use of professional casts, settings or crews, other than bona fide newsreel or news television (as defined by 43 CFR 5.12, per 43 CFR 5.2).

(b) Still photography of vehicles, or other articles of commerce or models for the purpose of commercial advertising (as defined by 43 CFR 5.12, per 43 CFR 5.2).

§5.6 Commercial Vehicles

(c) Commercial vehicles used on park area roads when such use is necessary for access to private lands situated within or adjacent to the park area, to which access is otherwise not available.

§5.7 Constructing or attempting to construct a building, or other structures, boat dock, road, trail, path, or other way, telephone line, telegraph line, power line, or any other private or public utility, upon across, over, through, or under any park areas.

§5.10 Eating, drinking, or lodging establishments.

(a) Operation of an establishment offering food, drink, or lodging for sale on any privately owned lands.

§7.13 Yellowstone National Park.

(a)(2) Transportation of any substance or combination of substances, including hazardous substances, hazardous materials, hazardous waste, or any marine pollutants on U.S. Highway 191 in emergencies or when such transportation is necessary for access to lands within or adjacent to the park area.

(a)(4) Operation of a commercial vehicle on any park road.

(b)(1) Motor vehicle owned and/or operated by an employee of the U.S. Government, park concessioners and contractors, whether employed in a permanent or temporary capacity.

(d)(1)(i) Operation of a vessel upon the waters of the park open to boating.

(d)(1)(ii) Any vessel operator with the intention to travel into either the South Arm or Southeast Arm “Five Mile Per Hour Zones” of Yellowstone Lake.

(d)(3)(i) Landing any vessel between Trail Creek and Beaverdam Creek prior to July 1

(e)(2) Fishing

(l)(9)(vi) Non-commercially Guided Snowmobile Access
 

Section V: General 36 CFR Regulations

PART 2 - RESOURCE PROTECTION, PUBLIC USE AND RECREATION

36 CFR §2.1 - Preservation of Natural, Cultural, and Archeological Resources:

(a)(4) Designated areas where dead wood on the ground may be collected for use as fuel for campfires within the park area:

SC1. In the immediate area surrounding a backcountry campsite where fires are permitted.

SC2. In developed areas or along park roads that are open to the public.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

(a)(5) Designated areas and conditions for walking on, climbing, entering, ascending, descending, or traversing an archeological or cultural resource, monument, or statue:

SC1. No areas or conditions have been designated as an exception to this prohibition.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

(b) Restrictions for hiking or pedestrian use to designated trail or walkway systems:

SC1. Foot travel is restricted to designated trails and walkway systems when traveling through signed revegetation and restoration areas.

Determination: Revegetation and restoration efforts are an importation function of the NPS. Revegetation and restoration is an attempt to get an area of the park back to baseline condition before a certain event or use caused unacceptable resource impacts. To successfully restore a park area back to baseline takes significant planning and effort for NPS staff. The Superintendent has determined this restriction is necessary and the least restrictive means to prevent further unacceptable resource impacts and provide an opportunity for successful revegetation and restoration attempts.

SC2. Foot travel within the Boiling River Swimming Area is restricted to designated trails and walkways.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

SC3. Foot travel within the Firehole Swimming Area is restricted to designated trails and walkways.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

SC4. Foot travel within the Yellowstone Canyon between Silver Cord Cascade and Inspiration Point is restricted to designated trails and boardwalks.

SC5. Foot travel within the Yellowstone Canyon between Chittenden Bridge and Upper Falls is restricted to designated trails and boardwalks.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined the restrictions in SC4 and SC5 are similar and connected to the areas closed in 36 CFR 7.13(j). These restrictions have been determined necessary to protect thermal resources and provide for visitor safety.

(c)(1) Designated fruits, berries, nuts, or unoccupied seashells that may be gathered for personal use or consumption within the park.

SC1. Edible berries and mushrooms may be gathered with following limitations and restrictions:

(a) Gathering is limited to 1 quart per species, per person, per day.

(b) Possession and consumption of berries and mushrooms is restricted to park areas.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined berries and mushrooms, in the amounts listed above, may be gathered to provide the public a unique recreational opportunity without negatively affecting park wildlife or plant resources.

36 CFR §2.2 - Wildlife Protection.

(d) Conditions and procedures for transporting lawfully taken wildlife through the park area:

SC1. It is prohibited to retrieve wounded or dead wildlife that travels into the park after an attempt to take the animal occurred outside park boundaries without written authorization from the Superintendent.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

SC2. Except for U.S. Highway 191, it is prohibited to transport lawfully taken wildlife and their parts through all areas of the park without written authorization from the Superintendent. Written authorization may be given only under the following conditions:

(a) All lawfully taken wildlife and their parts must be declared at a park entrance station.

(b) All lawfully taken wildlife and their parts must have valid harvest tags attached or present in accordance with state law, and the person who harvested the animal must be present with a valid hunting license.

(c) All wildlife and their parts must be field dressed, wrapped or otherwise covered so they are not visible on or within a motor vehicle.

(d) All lawfully taken wildlife from the animal kingdom family Cervidae (deer family) harvested from a state or province* with chronic wasting disease (CWD) diagnosed in their population must be transported in one or a combination of the following conditions:

(1) All meat is cut and wrapped either commercially or privately.

(2) The animal has been field dressed in a manner that no part of the spinal column or head is attached.

(3) All meat has been boned out.

(4) Hides have no head or spinal components attached.

(5) Skulls plates with antlers attached have no meat or tissue attached.

(6) Antlers have no meat or tissue attached.

(7) Teeth with no tissue attached.

*States and provinces with CWD diagnosed in their wildlife population: Arkansas, Colorado, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New Mexico, New York, North Dakota, Ohio (hunting preserve), Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin, Wyoming, Alberta and Saskatchewan.
Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

SC3. Upon receiving written authorization from the Superintendent to transport lawfully taken wildlife and parts thereof through the park, a person is prohibited from overnighting in the park and must take the most direct route between 2 of the 5 entrance stations that are part of through routes connecting the National Highway System.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

(e) Park areas closed to the viewing of wildlife with an artificial light:

SC1. The entire park is closed to viewing wildlife with artificial light, including flash photography.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

36 CFR §2.10 - Camping and Food Storage.

(a) Permits, designated sites or areas, and established conditions for camping:

Camping Permits

SC1. A backcountry use permit, camping permit, or reservation is required to stay overnight within front country and backcountry areas of the park.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

Designated Sites

SC2. The following locations are the only areas designated for camping within the park:

(a) Front Country Campgrounds.

(1) Bridge Bay.
(2) Canyon Campground.
(3) Fishing Bridge RV Park.
(4) Grant Village Campground.
(5) Indian Creek Campground.
(6) Lewis Lake Campground.
(7) Madison Campground.
(8) Mammoth Campground.
(9) Norris Campground.
(10) Pebble Creek Campground.
(11) Slough Creek Campground.
(12) Tower Falls Campground.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

(b) Designated Backcountry Campsites.

(c) Undesignated Backcountry Areas.

(1) Undesignated camping during the summer is prohibited, except when prescribed in a valid Yellowstone National Park Backcountry Use Permit.

(2) Undesignated camping during the winter is permitted with a Yellowstone National Park Backcountry Use Permit.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

SC3. Frontcountry Camping Conditions.

(a) Class A and B campsites are limited to no more than 6 persons sleeping per site.

(b) Vehicles must be parked on parking pads, so as not to block or restrict traffic, in class A and B campgrounds.

(c) Fishing Bridge RV Park is restricted to hard sided vehicles only, which means they must be constructed of solid, non-pliable material.

(d) Generators are prohibited from operating between the hours of 8:00 p.m. and 8:00 a.m., except in areas designated by signs or approved by an authorized official.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

SC4. Undesignated Camping Conditions.

(a) Camping must be out of sight and at least ¼ mile from park roads, developed areas, patrol cabins, thermal areas and other backcountry campers.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

(d) Food storage conditions:

SC1. The following definitions, established by the Superintendent, apply to the food storage restrictions listed in this section:

(a) Food means any item with a scent or any substance, except for water, that is eaten, drunk, or otherwise taken into the body by humans, pets, horses and pack animals, service animals, and livestock.

(b) Equipment used to cook or store food means any cooking utensils; pots; pans; plates; cups; stoves; grills; coolers, regardless of contents; storage containers and bags that contain or have previously contained food, except BRFCs; beverage containers; pet food bowls; and any other equipment and cooking or storage item that relates to food.

Determination: The Superintendent has established these definitions to clearly identify the items addressed in the food storage restrictions below. The definitions above are defined based on items park wildlife have been known to obtain and become food conditioned. The Superintendent has determined these definitions are necessary and considered the least restrictive means to protect park wildlife and the public.

SC2. In all park areas all food, lawfully taken fish or wildlife, garbage, and equipment used to cook or store food must be kept sealed in a vehicle, or in a camping unit that is constructed of solid, non-pliable material, or in a BRFC, or suspended at least 10 feet above the ground and 4 feet horizontally from a post, tree trunk, or other object, or suspended on an NPS established and designated food hanging pole. This restriction does not apply to park residents who are in compliance with the food storage conditions outlined in the Yellowstone National Park Housing Plan or to established NPS grills and fire grates in housing areas, picnic areas and campgrounds.
Determination: The Superintendent has implemented food storage restrictions for the entire park to prevent park wildlife from obtaining food and becoming food conditioned, especially Black and Grizzly Bears. The Superintendent has determined these restrictions are necessary and the least restrictive means to protect park wildlife and the public. The Superintendent has added BRFCs and NPS established and designated food hanging poles as a legal means to store food because they are constructed to prevent park wildlife from obtaining food and becoming food conditioned. In some areas, NPS established bear resistant containers and food hanging poles may be the only food storage option aside from BRFCs. The Superintendent has determined these options help prevent further restrictions on the public while protecting park wildlife and the public.
SC3. The following conditions apply when using a BRFC for food storage:

(a) In all areas, a BRFC must properly function in designed condition and be secured as prescribed by the manufacturer.

(b) In backcountry campsites, a BRFC must be stored within core camp.

(c) When undesignated camping, a BRFC must be stored 100 yards from any sleeping area.

(d) In developed, frontcountry areas, a BRFC must be kept in a vehicle, or in a camping unit that is constructed of solid, non-pliable material.

Determination: Although BRFCs are designed to prohibit bears from accessing the contents within, the smells associated with them may still attract wildlife into camping areas. Requiring BRFCs to be stored in the manner above has been determined necessary by the Superintendent to prevent negative human and wildlife interactions, especially involving Black and Grizzly Bears. The Superintendent has determined these are the least restrictive means to protect park wildlife and the public.

SC4. All refuse receptacles placed outdoors are only designated as an approved method for dumping if it is of bear-proof construction or placed inside bear-proof enclosures.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined this condition is necessary to prevent park wildlife from becoming food conditioned, namely Black and Grizzly Bears. The Superintendent has determined this is the least restrictive means to protect park wildlife and the public.

36 CFR §2.11 - Picnicking.

SC1. Backcountry campsites and boat docks associated with backcountry campsites on Yellowstone Lake may be used for picnicking unless the backcountry site is being occupied by a person with an active and valid Yellowstone National Park Backcountry Use Permit.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined these picnicking restrictions are necessary and the least restrictive means to avoid conflict between park users.

36 CFR §2.13 - Fires.

(a)(1) Designated areas, receptacles and conditions for lighting and maintaining a fire:

SC1. Except when seasonal fire restrictions based on local fire danger ratings have been established by the Superintendent, fires are permitted within the confines of NPS designated and installed fire rings, grills, or grates in the following locations:

(a) Picnic areas, unless the NPS has not designated and installed fire rings, grills or grates.

(b) All frontcountry campgrounds.

(c) All backcountry sites, unless designated otherwise in a Yellowstone National Park Backcountry Use Permit.

(d) Employee housing areas.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined the need for fires to be contained within NPS designated fire receptacles to prevent unintentional wildfire ignitions. If seasonal restrictions are implemented on the use of fires within NPS designated fire receptacles, the Superintendent has determined this process as the least restrictive means to manage their use. Any seasonal restrictions are implemented to protect park resources and the public from unintentional wildfire ignitions.

SC2. Except when seasonal fire restrictions have been established by the Superintendent, fires contained within a commercially manufactured charcoal grill are permitted in all park areas.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined the need for fires to be contained within commercially manufactured charcoal grills to prevent unintentional wildfire ignitions. If seasonal restrictions are implemented on the use of fires within commercially manufactured charcoal grills, the Superintendent has determined this process as the least restrictive means to manage their use. Any seasonal restrictions are implemented to protect park resources and the public from unintentional wildfire ignitions.

(a)(2) Use restrictions for stoves and lanterns:

SC1. Except when seasonal fire restrictions have been established by the Superintendent, the use of stoves and lanterns are permitted in all park areas.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined no restrictions are necessary for the use of stoves and lanterns unless seasonal weather and fire danger dictate otherwise. If seasonal restrictions are implemented, the Superintendent has determined this process as the least restrictive means to manage the use of stoves and lanterns. Any seasonal restrictions are implemented to protect park resources and the public from unintentional wildfire ignitions.

(b) Conditions for extinguishing fires:

SC1. Any fuel used to light and maintain a fire, including coals and remains, must be cold to touch prior to abandonment.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these conditions are necessary and the least restrictive means to protect park resources and the public from an unintentional wildlife ignition.

36 CFR §2.14 - Sanitation and refuse

(a)(2) Established conditions for use of government refuse receptacles:

SC1. The use of refuse receptacles located within government areas, administrative areas and park housing areas is prohibited, except for park residents and those authorized to live within the park.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

(a)(5) Areas designated for bathing, or washing food, clothing, dishes, or other property:

SC1. Areas designated for such use will be posted with signs.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

(a)(7) Designations for disposing of fish remains on land, or in waters within 200 feet of boat docks or designated swimming beaches, or within developed areas:

SC1. No other designations have been established for this prohibition.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

(a)(9) Designations for disposal of human body waste in nondeveloped areas:

SC1. No other designations have been established.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

(b) Human body waste conditions:

SC1. In all nondeveloped areas, human waste must be disposed of in NPS designated pit toilets or buried in a hole at least 6 inches deep and in coordination with the requirements listed in §2.14(a)(9).

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

SC2. All toilet paper or similar material must be carried out of nondeveloped areas, except when using an NPS designated pit toilet, and disposed of in refuse receptacles.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

SC3. Depositing refuse in NPS designated pit toilets is prohibited, except for toilet paper.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

36 CFR §2.15 - Pets.

(a)(1) Areas closed to the possession of pets:

SC1. Except for service animals, pack animals, pets onboard day-use power-driven vessels, and pets within 100 feet of an established road or parking area, the following areas are closed to the possession of pets:

(a) Caves.

(b) Trails, except the railroad bed paralleling the Yellowstone River from Reese Creek to Gardiner, MT.

(c) Boardwalks.

(d) Undeveloped (backcountry) areas.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

SC2. Service animals are not subject to the park’s pet policies and, when accompanying an individual with a disability, they are allowed wherever visitors are allowed.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined this necessary to align with NPS Memorandum 19-02 – Use of Service Animals by Visitors with Disabilities.

(a)(3) Designated areas or conditions for leaving a pet unattended and tied to an object:

SC1. No areas or conditions have been established as an exception to this prohibition.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

(a)(5) Pet excrement disposal conditions:

SC1. Pet owners or responsible persons shall promptly remove and dispose pet excrement from all park areas.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

(e) Conditions for residents keeping pets:

SC1. Park residents may keep pets in accordance with Yellowstone National Park’s housing and pet policy. Service animals are not subject to the park’s pet policies.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined these conditions are necessary to align with NPS Policy Memorandum 19-02 – Use of Service Animals by Visitors with Disabilities.

36 CFR §2.16 - Horse and Pack Animals.

(a) “Pack animals” have been designated for Yellowstone National Park in “SECTION I: 36 CFR § 1.4 WHAT TERMS DO I NEED TO KNOW?” of this document.

(b) Trails, routes and areas designated for horses and pack animals:

SC1. Horses and pack animals are prohibited in class A and B campgrounds.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

SC2. Horse and pack animal travel.

(a) Horse and pack animal travel is permitted on and off-trail in the park, except:

(1) Off-trail travel by pack string is prohibited, unless accessing a designated backcountry campsite that is not accessible by a trail maintained for foot travel and marked by official signs.

(2) The areas and trails closed to travel by horse and pack animals listed in part and sections (c), (d), and (e) of this part.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

(b) Horse and pack animal travel is prohibited in all thermal areas and within Yellowstone Canyon unless confined to trails that are maintained for foot travel and marked by official signs or as otherwise designated in section (d) and (e) of this part.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

(c) Horse and pack animal travel is prohibited on the following trails:

(1) All boardwalks.
(2) All frontcountry trails.
(3) Artist Paint Pot trails.
(4) Artist Point trails.
(5) Avalanche Peak trail.
(6) Beaver Pond trails.
(7) Bunsen Peak trails.
(8) Canyon trails.
(9) Fairy Falls trail.
(10) Harlequin Lake trail.
(11) Osprey Falls trail.
(12) Seven Mile Hole trail.
(13) Sheepeater trail.
(14) Storm Point trails.
(15) Tower Fall trail.
(16) Trout Lake trail.
(17) Wraith Falls trail.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

(d) Horse and pack animal travel is prohibited in the following locations:

(1) Developed areas.
(2) Boiling River Swimming Area.
(3) Clear Lake.
(4) Lava Creek.
(5) Lost Lake.
(6) Monument Geyser Basin.
(7) Point Sublime.
(8) Riverside.
(9) Shoshone Geyser Basin.
(10) Upper Terraces.
(11) Washburn Hot Springs.
(12) West Thumb Overlook.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

SC3. The following are prohibited at trailheads:

(a) Leaving a horse or pack animal overnight.

(b) Leaving a horse or pack animal unattended.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

(d) Designations for free-trailing or loose-herding of horses or pack animals on trails:

SC1. No designated areas exist as an exception to this prohibition.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

(g) Horse and pack animal conditions:

SC1. All travel by horse and pack animal is prohibited before July 1st, unless designated otherwise by signs at trailheads.

Determination: Stock use in the park is an intensive use. To prevent injury to park resources and trails, the Superintendent has determined this condition necessary. Prior to July 1st, most park trails are either under snow or muddy. Stock travel during this time period can cause deeper ruts in the trail system or for users to go around sections of trail with less than ideal conditions. Additionally, secondary trails paralleling or going around degrading sections of trail are created which denude vegetation and create a greater impact on backcountry areas.

SC2. All users must provide a valid proof of a negative Coggins test within the past 12 months for all equine upon request.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

SC3. Horse and pack animals must travel in single file on trails.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

SC4. Horse and pack animals are prohibited from entering or using core camp, except to load and unload equipment.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

SC5. Horse and pack animal feed.

(a) Only certified weed-free cubes, grain or pellets, may be used in the park.

(b) Hay is prohibited to be used in the park.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

SC6. Horse and pack animal limits.

(a) Stock parties are limited to 25 horses and pack animals, except when traveling off-trail.

(b) Stock parties are limited to 6 horses and pack animals when traveling off-trail.

(c) Pack strings are limited to a 2 to 1 ratio of ridden horse or pack animal to packed animal.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

SC7. Horse and pack animal manure removal conditions.

(a) Horse and pack animal manure must be removed from developed areas.

(b) Horse and pack animal manure must be removed or scattered at least 100 feet away from core camp and hitch line areas.

(c) Manure must be removed or scattered in all areas, except as specified in section (a) and (b) of this part or when a horse or pack animal is underway.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

SC8. Horse and pack animal retention conditions.

(a) The use of electric fence, pickets and natural features are permitted to retain stock.

(b) Constructing corrals or drift fences is prohibited.

(c) When man made materials are not available, pick pins may be constructed out of dead and downed wood.

(d) Regardless of retention method, the following are prohibited:

(1) Retaining a horse or pack animal within 100 feet of water, designated trails or campsites.

(2) Allowing resource injury to occur to a natural feature.

(3) Failing to move a horse or pack animal to prevent resource injury such as damaging or denuding soil and vegetation or overgrazing.

(4) Failing to remove picket pints after use.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

SC9. Report of lost or deceased horse and pack animals.

(a) An owner or operator who has a horse or pack animal that is deceased or lost, shall report the animal to the Superintendent as soon as practicable but within 24 hours. If the incident occurred in a remote area and the owner or operator is unable to meet the 24 hour reporting requirement, they shall report the incident before leaving the park.

(b) The owner or operator of a deceased horse or pack animal shall remove the deceased animal in accordance with procedures established by the Superintendent.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

SC10. Trailers used to transport horse and pack animals must be clean and free of excess manure and loose hay when entering the park.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

36 CFR §2.18 - Snowmobiles.

Yellowstone National Park has promulgated the operation and use of snowmobiles within the park as special regulations in 36 CFR §7.13(l). The regulations found in this section only apply if they do not conflict with the paragraphs in §7.13(l).

36 CFR §2.19 - Winter Activities.

(a) Designated areas for skiing, snowshoeing, ice skating, sledding, innertubing, tobogganing and similar winter sports on park roads and in parking areas open to motor vehicle traffic:

SC1. Except for non-motorized travel promulgated as special regulations by Yellowstone National Park in §7.13(l)(16)(i) to (iii), no designations have been established for this prohibition.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

(b) Designated areas or routes for the towing of persons on skis, sleds, or other sliding devices by motor vehicle or snowmobile.

SC2. Except for the designation promulgated as special regulations by Yellowstone National Park in §7.13(l)(13)(i)(G), no designations or routes have been established for this prohibition.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

36 CFR §2.20 - Skating, Skateboards and Similar Devices.

The use of roller skates, skateboards, roller skis, roller blades or similar devices are permitted in the following areas:

SC1. Government areas, NPS housing areas and administrative areas.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

SC2. Grand Loop Road and West Entrance Road, between Upper Terrace Drive and West Yellowstone, MT, when they are closed to motor vehicle use by the public, but open to motor vehicle use for administrative purposes.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

36 CFR §2.21 - Smoking.

(a) Park areas, buildings, structures or facilities closed to smoking:

SC1. All interior spaces and outdoor areas within 25 feet of air intake ducts, including doors and windows, of buildings owned, rented, or leased by the federal government. This closure does not apply to park employees following the Yellowstone National Park Service Employee Housing Policy.

Determination: The Superintendent has implemented this closure in accordance with Executive Order 13058 entitled “Protecting Federal Employees and the Public from Exposure to Tobacco Smoke in the Federal Workplace.” The intent of EO 13058 is to establish a smoke-free environment for Federal employees and members of the public visiting or using Federal facilities. The superintendent has determined this closure to be necessary and the least restrictive means to ensure federal employees and the public have access to smoke-free environments.

SC2. Thermal areas.

Determination: All travel in thermal areas is restricted to NPS designated trails and boardwalks. Since the public use is confined, the Superintendent has determined it necessary to provide a smoke-free environment for the public. Additionally, refuse related to smoking is often not discarded properly which is a concern in thermal areas which are sensitive to human refuse. The Superintendent has determined this closure is necessary and is the least restrictive means to protect park resources and ensure federal employees and the public have access to smoke-free environments.

SC3. The grounds associated with the Mammoth Community Center.

Determination: The grounds associated with the Mammoth Community Center are used for the enjoyment of federal employees and concession employees. The Superintendent has determined this closure to be necessary and the least restrictive means to ensure federal employees and concession employees access to smoke-free environments.

SC4. Flammable storage areas.

SC5. Fuel refilling areas.

Determination: Smoking in flammable storage and fuel refilling areas is inherently dangerous and poses a great threat to federal employee and the public. The Superintendent has determined this closure is necessary and the least restrictive means to provide safety measures for federal employees and the public.

36 CFR §2.22 - Property.

(a)(2) Unattended property designations and conditions:

SC1. Motor vehicles, including oversnow vehicles, may park in parking lots at or adjacent to trailheads for the duration of an active and valid Yellowstone National Park Backcountry Use Permit.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

SC2. In developed areas, between May 1st to November 1st, vessels and related equipment may be left unattended at locations designated by signs, at designated mooring slips, and at designated parking areas for the dates listed on a valid Yellowstone National Park Boat Permit or Yellowstone National Park Backcountry Use Permit.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

SC3. In undeveloped areas, between May 1st and November 1st, non power–driven vessels that can be hand carried may be left unattended for longer than 24 hours under the following conditions:

(a) Only during the dates listed on an active and valid Yellowstone National Park Backcountry Use Permit.

(b) Only when it has been removed from the water and stored out of sight from trails, campsites and water.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

SC4. In undeveloped areas, between May 1st and November 1st, power-drive vessels may be beached and left unattended for more than 24 hours only during the dates listed on an active and valid Yellowstone National Park Backcountry Use Permit.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

SC5. The device used to power a vessel may be left unattended for longer than 24 hours on the shoreline of Lewis Lake, near the mouth of Lewis River, under the following conditions:

(a) Only when an active and valid Yellowstone National Park Backcountry Use Permit has an itinerary utilizing Shoshone Lake backcountry campsites.

(b) Only during the dates listed on an active and valid Yellowstone National Park Backcountry Use Permit.

(c) Only when it has been stored out of sight from trails and water.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

SC6. Vessels or related equipment owned by employees, persons authorized to reside in the park, and concession operated businesses may be left unattended for longer than 24 hours so long as it is stored at designated locations in park housing areas or at locations approved by the Superintendent.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

36 CFR §2.35 - Alcoholic beverages and controlled substances.

(a)(3)(i) The superintendent may close all or a portion of a public use area or public facility within a park area to the consumption of alcoholic beverages and/or to the possession of a bottle, can or other receptacle containing an alcoholic beverage that is open, or that has been opened, or whose seal is broken or the contents of which have been partially removed.

SC1. The following areas and facilities within the park are closed to the consumption of alcoholic beverages and to the possession of a bottle, can or other receptacle containing an alcoholic beverage that is open, or that has been opened, or whose seal is broken or the contents of which have been partially removed:

(a) Except for Arch Park, the area north of the line from the mouth of the Gardner River, directly to the fence bordering the south side of Park Street proximal to Gardiner, MT, west to where the fence meets the stone wall of the Roosevelt Arch, along the stone wall to its western terminus, and directly north to the park boundary is closed to the consumption of alcoholic beverages.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.
(b) The Mammoth Little People’s Learning Center.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

(c) Thermal areas.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

36 CFR §2.38 - Explosives.

(b) Designated areas for using or possessing fireworks and firecrackers:

SC1. No areas have been designated for using or possessing fireworks and firecrackers.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

36 CFR §2.51 - Demonstrations.

(c)(2) The following locations have been designated as available for demonstrations and the sale or distribution of printed matter:

SC1. Canyon Village parking lot; Uncle Tom’s (Upper Falls); Fishing Bridge Visitor Center parking lot; Lake Hotel parking lot; Madison Museum parking lot; south of the Mammoth Visitor Center; Old Faithful developed area; Tower Fall parking lot; and West Thumb Geyser Basin parking lot.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

36 CFR §2.62 - Memorialization

(b) Designated areas and conditions for scattering human ashes from cremation:

SC1. Scattering human ashes from cremation is allowed in the park, except in and near:

(a) Developed areas.

(b) Backcountry trails.

(c) Backcountry campsites.

(d) Thermal areas.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.
 

PART 3 – BOATING AND WATER USE ACTIVITIES


36 CFR §3.7 – What are the NPS Personal Flotation Device (PFD) requirements?

(b) Designated requirements for a PFD to be worn or carried on designated waters, at designated times, and/or during designated water based activities:

SC1. Sailboarders (windsurfers) are required to wear a U.S. Coast Guard approved Type I, II, III, or V PFD on all park waters open to boating.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety.

36 CFR §3.8 – What vessel operations are prohibited?

(a)(2) Designated launch sites:

SC1. Hand carried vessels can be launched or recovered in any area surrounding park waters open to boating except:

(a) In or within 25 feet of a geothermal area.

(b) In an area closed to public use.

(c) In areas designated by signs or as posted on maps in visitor use areas.

(d) The shoreline of Yellowstone Lake between Little Thumb Creek and the south end of the West Thumb Geyser Basin.

(e) Along the Yellowstone River from the mouth of Gardner River to the boundary corner at the mouth of Reese Creek.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

SC2. Vessels requiring trailers can only be launched or recovered at the following locations:

(a) Bridge Bay Marina boat launch.

(b) Grant Village Marina boat launch.

(c) Lewis Lake boat launch near Lewis Lake Campground.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

(a)(4) Vessel length, width, or horsepower restrictions:

SC1. Operating a vessel 40 feet or greater is prohibited on all park waters, except for approved park concession operations.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined this restriction is necessary because park infrastructure (e.g. docks) are not designed for boats greater than 40 feet to use.

(b)(3) Areas designated for flat wake speed:

SC1. Bridge Bay Marina.

SC2. Grand Village Marina.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

36 CFR §3.12 – May I use a vessel to tow a person for water skiing or other similar activities?

(a) Designated waters for towing of a person by a vessel:

SC1. All park waters are closed to towing of a person by a vessel.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

36 CFR §3.14 – Am I required to remove a sunken, grounded, or disabled vessel?

(a) Procedures for the removal of a sunken, grounded, or disabled vessel:

SC1. Notification to the Superintendent of a sunken, grounded, or disabled vessel is required. Procedures for removing a vessel will be created on a case-by-case basis in accordance with the requirements of this section.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

36 CFR §3.16 – May I swim or wade in park waters?

SC1. Swimming is prohibited in:

(a) Yellowstone River, starting at the outlet of Yellowstone Lake and continuing downstream for one mile.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined swimming is prohibited in this area to protect cutthroat trout spawning habitat.

SC2. Swimming and wading is prohibited in:

(a) All park waters when wearing or using foot gear with felt or other fibrous material on the soles.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined this prohibition is a necessary step to prevent the spread of AIS in park waters which would not only effect park resources but potentially all areas downstream in the major watersheds that start and are protected by Yellowstone National Park. Although a “clean and dry your gear” message and campaign can be successful in preventing the spread of AIS by foot gear, it was determined felt or other fibrous soles posed a more serious threat for the spread of AIS and needed to be banned. Research suggests felt or other fibrous material on the soles of foot gear can be harder to clean, more difficult to dry and retain AIS longer than other types of foot gear material.

(b) Bridge Bay Channel and Marina.

Determination: Bridge Bay is the busiest boating hub in the park. The Superintendent has determined swimming and wading in this area will protect the public and prevent user conflicts.

(c) Crawfish Creek, from the South Entrance Road Bridge to a point ¼ mile downstream.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

(d) Firehole River, 200 yards upstream and downstream of the footbridge connecting Midway Geyser Basin and Midway Geyser Basin parking area.

(e) Firehole River, from Grand Loop Road Bridge at Biscuit Basin to the Grand Loop Road Bridge approximately ½ mile from Old Faithful Geyser.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined this area closed to swimming and wading to protect the public.

36 CFR §3.17 – What regulations apply to swimming areas and beaches?

(a) Designated swimming areas or swimming beaches:

SC1. Firehole Swimming Area

SC2. Boiling River Swimming Area

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.


(c) Prohibitions of incompatible activities in swimming areas or swimming beaches:

SC1. The following are prohibited in all designated swimming areas or beaches:

(a) Swimming or wading in the defined swimming area or beach when the area is posted closed.

(b) Climbing, diving or jumping from cliffs or trees.

(c) Possessing glass containers.

(d) Using soap, shampoo, conditioner or any other substance, except sunscreen.

(e) Using any vessel or flotation device, except for USCG approved PFDs.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

SC2. It is prohibited to place any object, to include natural material, in the Boiling River Thermal Channel prior to its confluence with the Gardner River.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

36 CFR §3.18 – May I snorkel or underwater dive in park waters?

(a) Closures and restrictions for snorkeling and underwater diving:

SC1. Snorkeling and underwater diving is prohibited in Yellowstone River, starting at the outlet of Yellowstone Lake and continuing downstream for one mile.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined this area closed to snorkeling and underwater diving to protect cutthroat trout spawning habitat.
 

PART 4 - VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC SAFETY


36 CFR §4.11 - Load, weight and size limits.

(a) Vehicle load, weight and size limit restrictions:

SC1. Except for vehicles transporting asphalt products required to repair and maintain roads within the park, vehicles wider than 8 feet 6 inches or longer than 75 feet are prohibited on park roads unless a permit has been issued by the Superintendent.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

SC2. Firehole Lake Drive is closed to vehicles over 6 tons.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

36 CFR §4.21 - Speed Limits.

(b) Speed limits designated by the Superintendent:

SC1. The speed limit on U.S. Highway 191 is 55 mph within the park.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

36 CFR §4.30 - Bicycles

(b) Administrative roads. The following administrative roads are authorized for bicycle use:

SC1. Unless posted closed at entrance points and except as specified in 36 CFR §4.30(f) and §7.13(l)(16)(iii), bicycles are authorized to be used on Grand Loop Road and all park entrance roads when they are closed to motor vehicle use by the public, but open to motor vehicle use for administrative purposes.

Determination: Between public motor vehicle travel and oversnow travel periods, Grand Loop Road and park entrance roads close to public motor vehicle use, but remain open for administrative travel. When conditions are safe, the Superintendent has determined bicycle use is authorized during these periods to allow continued bicycle travel by the public within the interior of the park. The Superintendent has determined these roads may need to be closed during these administrative travel periods when NPS plowing operations are underway or when roads are in such a condition that bicycle use is unsafe. Where bicycle use is authorized, the NPS will post signs to indicate whether the route is open or closed.

Mammoth area.

SC2. Golden Gate Service Road.
SC3. Mammoth Service Road, from Old Gardiner Road to the telephone microwave station.
SC4. The Old Gardiner Road.
SC5. The Bunsen Peak Road.
SC6. Swan Lake Gravel Pit Road.
SC7. Obsidian Creek Campground Road.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

Old Faithful area.

SC8. Lone Star Geyser Road, from Grand Loop Road to the turnaround area near Lone Star Geyser.
SC9. Fountain Freight Road.
SC10. Fire Road, from the Government Area to the Ranger Station.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

Lake Village area.

SC11. Natural Bridge Road.
SC12. The roadbed from the Lake Fish Hatchery Building to the Transfer Station.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

Tower-Lamar area.

SC13. Mount Washburn Service Road, from Chittenden Road Parking Lot to the summit of Mt. Washburn.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

(d) Existing trails. The following existing trails have been designated for bicycle use:

Mammoth area.

SC1. The railroad bed paralleling the Yellowstone River, from Reese Creek to Gardiner, MT.
SC2. The trail paralleling Grand Loop Road, from the Mammoth Restroom to the YCC Camp Road.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

Old Faithful area.

SC3. The trail from the Visitor Center to Morning Glory Pool.
SC4. The trail from Bitterroot Dorm to the Fire Road.
SC5. Daisy Geyser Cut-off trail.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

West Yellowstone area.

SC6. Riverside Trail, from the West Entrance Station to Barns Road.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

(f) Closures and other use restrictions.

Grand Loop Road and park entrance roads when open to motor vehicle use for administrative purposes.

SC1. Bicycle operation is permitted during day light hours on sections of Grand Loop Road and park entrance roads when they are open in accordance with §4.30(b) SC1.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

SC2. The following sections of Grand Loop Road and park entrance roads are closed to bicycle use during spring administrative travel periods:

(a) Tower Fall to Dunraven Pass until the second Friday in May.
(b) Dunraven Pass to Canyon Village.
(c) Canyon Village to Norris Junction.
(d) Canyon Village to Lake Village.
(e) Fishing Bridge to the east side of Sylvan Pass (6 mile corner).
(f) Lake Village to West Thumb Junction.
(g) West Thumb Junction to Madison Junction.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

Fall Bicycle Routes

SC3. The following sections of Grand Loop Road and park entrance roads are closed to bicycle use during fall administrative travel periods:

(a) Chittenden Road to Canyon Village.
(b) Canyon Village to Norris Junction.
(c) Canyon Village to Lake Village.
(d) Fishing Bridge to the east side of Sylvan Pass (6 mile corner).
(e) Lake Village to West Thumb Junction.
(f) West Thumb Junction to Old Faithful.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

(h)(4) Areas authorized for operating a bicycle abreast of another bicycle:

SC1. No areas have been authorized for operating a bicycle abreast of another bicycle.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

36 CFR §4.31 - Hitchhiking.

Designated areas and conditions for hitchhiking or soliciting transportation in park areas:

SC1. All areas within the park are permitted for hitchhiking or soliciting transport except:

(a) Within 0.2 miles of park entrance stations.

(b) Within 200 feet schools, businesses, NPS office buildings, or visitor centers.

(c) In signed residential or government areas.

(d) In an area where vehicles may not safely pull off a park road fully onto the road’s shoulder or into a pull out.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these restrictions are necessary for public safety, but also acknowledges the allowance to accommodate the needs of park users and staff given the lack of a public transportation system and distances between locations in the park.

SC2. Persons hitchhiking or soliciting transport are prohibited from the following:

(a) Holding or having a sign larger than 2 feet x 2 feet.

(b) Standing on the paved surface of a park road, except for clearly defined pull outs.

(c) Wearing dark colored clothing during hours of darkness.

(d) Being under the influence of alcohol or an intoxicating substance.

(e) Being unsafe or causing a nuisance.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these restrictions are necessary for public safety, but also acknowledges the allowance to accommodate the needs of park users and staff given the lack of a public transportation system and distances between locations in the park.
 

Section VI: 36 CFR Part 7 - Special Regulations, Areas of the National Park System

36 CFR §7.13 - Yellowstone National Park

(a)(4) The superintendent may require a permit and establish terms and conditions for the operation of a commercial vehicle on any park road.

SC1. Except for U.S. Highway 191, a permit is required for the operation of a commercial vehicle on any park road.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

SC2. Commercial vehicles, as described in 36 CFR §5.6(a) and to include vans 1 ton or lighter, may be permitted to travel on any park road as long as they are not commercial passenger-carrying, transporting natural resources, hazardous materials or substances, or hauling a trailer of any type or size and pay the commercial entrance fee prior to entering the park. The commercial entrance permit issued at a park entrance station will be the permit required to operate on any park road as referenced in this paragraph.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these prohibitions and restrictions are necessary for public safety and resource protection.

(e)(2) Fishing closures, conditions and restrictions:

Yellowstone National Park Fishing Permit

SC1. Adult

(a) To fish within the park, people 16 years of age and older are required to purchase and carry on their person a Yellowstone National Park Fishing Permit.

(b) The Yellowstone National Park Fishing Permit is only valid when the permit is signed by the permittee and is non-transferrable.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined fishing permits are necessary to ensure visitors obtain critical information regarding the park’s fishery and regulations in order to protect park resources.


SC2. Child


(a) To fish within the park, people 15 years of age and younger are required to do one of the following:

(1) Fish under the direct supervision of an adult, a person 16 years of age or older, or a guardian who has purchased, signed, and is carrying on their person a Yellowstone National Park Fishing Permit.

(2) Obtain a free Yellowstone National Park Fishing Permit which must be signed by an adult, 16 years of age or older, or guardian. A child who has obtained this type of permit may fish without direct supervision of an adult or guardian.


(b) When a child is fishing, the adult or guardian associated with the child is responsible for the child’s actions and is liable for any violations of applicable State and Federal fishing laws and regulations.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined these permit requirements are necessary for children to ensure critical information is received by a parent or guardian and is shared with their child, regardless of which option is chosen, so park resources are protect.


SC3. A Yellowstone National Park Fishing Permit is not required to fish in the Yellowstone River on the north boundary of the park from the mouth of the Gardner River to the park’s boundary corner at the mouth of Reece Creek. Fishing in this area will be in accordance with 36 CFR §2.3 and the State of Montana fishing regulations, to include the requirement to obtain a Montana State Fishing License.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined Yellowstone National Park Fishing Permits are not required in this area to alleviate confusion over the boundary of Yellowstone National Park and the State of Montana.

Seasons and Fishing Hours

SC4. The park’s fishing season begins the Saturday immediately prior to Memorial Day and ends the first Sunday in November, except in the following areas:


(a) Blacktail Pond.


(1) Fishing season begins July 1st and ends the first Sunday in November.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined the fishing season dates for this area are necessary to protect nesting birds and sensitive vegetation.


(b) Heart Lake.


(1) Fishing season begins July 1st and ends the first Sunday in November.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined the fishing season dates for this area are necessary to align with the opening of a bear management area closure encompassing this area.


(c) Yellowstone Lake Tributaries.


(1) The fishing season for all streams and their tributaries flowing into Yellowstone Lake, to include an area 100 yards from each stream’s outlet into Yellowstone Lake, begins July 15th and ends the first Sunday in November.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined the fishing season dates for this area are necessary to protect spawning Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout and to align with the opening of a bear management area closure encompassing this area.


(d) Yellowstone River.


(1) The fishing season for the Yellowstone River and its tributaries from the outlet of Yellowstone Lake to the top of Upper Falls begins July 15th and ends the first Sunday in November.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined the fishing season dates for this area are necessary to protect spawning Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout.


SC5. Fishing is only permitted from sunrise to sunset during the park’s established fishing seasons.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined these fishing hours are necessary to protect park resources and visitors by minimizing the potential for negative human and wildlife interactions.

Waters Closed to Fishing

SC6. In addition to the areas listed in 36 CFR §7.13(e)(3), the following park waters are closed to fishing:


(a) Firehole River.


(1) From the Grand Loop Road Bridge at Biscuit Basin to the Grand Loop Road Bridge approximately 1/2 mile from Old Faithful Geyser.

(2) Two hundred (200) yards either side of the Midway Geyser Basin footbridge.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined these closures necessary to protect sensitive thermal features and areas.


(b) Madison River.


(1) From Seven Mile Bridge to a point 250 yards upstream.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined this closure is necessary to protect potential nesting areas for Trumpeter Swans.


(c) Trout Lake.


(1) The entire inlet stream and a portion of the lake, marked with signs, near the mouth of the inlet stream.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined this closure is necessary to protect spawning Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout.


(d) Yellowstone River.


(1) One hundred (100) yards either side of Le Hardy Rapids.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined this closure is necessary to protect Harlequin Duck nesting grounds and a concentrated fish migration corridor.

General Fishing Regulations

SC7. Except as otherwise designated, the following are prohibited in all lakes, streams, and tributaries administered by Yellowstone National Park:


(a) Fishing in any other manner than by one rod, which is capable of being held in hand while landing a fish, that has one line attached or by one hand-operated line without a rod or reel.

(b) Fishing with anything other than an artificial fly or artificial lure attached to one line. Except as otherwise provided in these regulations, this prohibition does not include weights or split shot, attractors, and strike indicators.

(c) Fishing with an attractor, except in a lake.

(d) Fishing with more than 2 artificial flies, one of which must be a dropper, or one artificial lure attached to one line.

(e) Fishing with an artificial fly that has:


(1) More than a single hook.

(2) A single hook with more than a single point.

(3) Anything other than a barbless hook.


(f) Fishing with an artificial lure that has:


(1) More than a single hook.

(2) A single hook with more than a treble point.

(3) Anything other than a barbless hook.


(g) Fishing with anything other than an artificial fly in designated fly fishing only waters.

(h) Snagging.

(i) Using or possessing a scented attractant while fishing.

(j) Using or possessing bait while fishing.

(k) Using an artificial fly, artificial lure, or fishing tackle that is made of lead or has lead added to it.

(l) Using an artificial light for the purposes of fishing.

(m) Continuing to fish after a person has reached the daily possession limit.

(n) Upgrading.

(o) Possessing a fish hooked anywhere other than inside the mouth or forward of the rear margin of the gill plate.

(p) Possessing a fish that does not have skin attached so the fish species may be visibly identified; gills and entrails may be removed.

(q) Possessing a Yellowstone Native Fish species.

(r) Disposing of fish or entrails within 200 feet of a backcountry campsite or into waters it was not taken.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined these regulations are necessary to protect the park’s fishery and to support resource management objectives.


Designated Fly Fishing Only Waters

SC8. The following streams are designated for fly fishing only:


(a) Firehole River.

(b) Gibbon River, downstream of Gibbon Falls.

(c) Madison River.

Determination: The Superintendent has designated these streams as fly fishing only to protect the Blue Ribbon trout streams and trophy fishery by alleviating other forms of fishing pressure.


Daily Possession Limits and Release Restrictions
Native Trout Conservation Area
SC9. No possession limit exists for nonnative fish species.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined the lack of possession limit for nonnative species in the Native Trout Conservation Area is necessary because they are in direct competition with Yellowstone Native Fish Species which the park is trying to protect and bolster their population.

SC10. The following are prohibited:


(a) Releasing Rainbow Trout, Brook Trout, or Cutthroat Trout x Rainbow Trout Hybrids after taking them from the Lamar River drainage.

(b) Releasing Lake Trout after taking them from Yellowstone Lake.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined these prohibitions necessary because these nonnatve fish species are in direct competition with Yellowstone Native Fish Species which the park is trying to protect and bolster their population in the Native Trout Conservation Area.


Nonnative Trout Tolerance Area
SC11. Rainbow Trout and Brown Trout are catch and release only in the following streams and their tributaries:


(a) Firehole River.

(b) Gibbon River, below Gibbon Falls.

(c) Madison River.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined these waters to be catch and release only to protect the Blue Ribbon trout streams and Trophy fishery.


SC12. A person may only possess a total of 5 Brook Trout per day from the following streams and their tributaries:


(a) Firehole River.

(b) Gibbon River, below Gibbon Falls.

(c) Madison River.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined these possession limits are necessary to reduce competition with the Trophy Brown Trout and Rainbow Trout fishery, as well as to protect native fish species such as the Longnose Dace, Mottled Sculpin and Mountain Whitefish.


SC13. A person may only possess a combination of 5 Brook Trout, Brown Trout, and Lake Trout, only one of which may be a Brown Trout, from the Lewis River drainage, above Lewis Falls.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined this possession limit necessary to protect a Trophy Brown Trout fishery.

(l)(7)(ii) Closures for oversnow routes, or portions thereof for snowmobile travel:

SC1. Firehole Canyon Drive is closed to all northbound oversnow vehicle use from 7:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. During this time, only snowmobiles and long track snowcoaches are permitted to travel southbound.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these restrictions are necessary for public safety.

SC2. Firehole Canyon Drive is closed to all southbound oversnow vehicle use from 1:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. During this time, only snowcoaches are permitted to travel northbound.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these restrictions are necessary for public safety.

(l)(8)(ii) Closures for oversnow routes, or portions thereof for snowcoach travel:

SC1. Firehole Canyon Drive is closed to all northbound oversnow vehicle use from 7:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. During this time, only snowmobiles and long track snowcoaches are permitted to travel southbound.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these restrictions are necessary for public safety.

SC2. Firehole Canyon Drive is closed to all southbound oversnow vehicle use from 1:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. During this time, only snowcoaches are permitted to travel northbound.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these restrictions are necessary for public safety.

(l)(12)(ii) Operating hours, dates and use levels for snowmobiles and snowcoaches during the park’s oversnow travel period:

SC1. Unless otherwise specified by the terms and conditions of a permit or contract, private and commercial oversnow travel must be conducted between the hours of 7:00 a.m. and 9:00 p.m.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that these restrictions are necessary for public safety.

Last updated: September 17, 2019

Contact the Park

Mailing Address:

PO Box 168
Yellowstone National Park, WY 82190-0168

Phone:

307-344-7381

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