Wildflowers of Whiskeytown

A diverse array of wildflowers can be seen blooming in Whiskeytown from April to June in the lower elevations around the lake. Higher elevation wildflowers in Coggins Park and on Shasta Bally reach their peak from June to August after the snow melts.

Wildflowers frequently seen along the trails and roads of Whiskeytown include lupines, brodiaeas, iris, poppies, phlox, sunflowers, buttercups, and monkey flowers. Whiskeytown has many beautiful California native wildflowers for you to discover.

Please help us protect these unique natural treasures by taking only pictures and memories. Cutting flowers is not only a federal offense but more importantly it prevents other visitors from enjoying the beauty Whiskeytown has to offer.

Heteromeles Arbutifolia - Toyon
Toyon (Heteromeles arbutifolia)

NPS/Lisa Johnston

Toyon
Heteromeles arbutifolia
Best viewed: June-August
Flower size: 6-10 mm flowers in dense clusters
Family: Rosaceae
Habitat: Slopes and canyons in chaparral communities
Type: Shrub
Notes: This shrub is very common throughout the burned areas of the park.
Aesculus californica - California Buckeye
California Buckeye (Aesculus californica)

NPS/Lisa Johnston

California Buckeye
Aesculus californica
Best viewed: May-July
Flower size: Clusters of small flowers arranged in panicles 6-8 inches long
Family: Sapindaceae
Habitat: Foothill slopes and canyons
Type: Long-lived shrub or tree
Notes: Buckeye nectar and pollen are toxic to honeybees, but the nectar is often favored by butterflies.
California Fuchsia Epilobium canum
California Fuchsia (Epilobium Canum)

NPS/Lisa Johnston

California Fuchsia
Epilobium canum
Best viewed: July-October
Flower size: 2-3 cm
Family: Onagraceae
Habitat: Chaparral and mixed lowland forest
Type: Perennial herb
Notes: California fuchsia can be seen growing in the planters near the Visitor Center.
Eriodictyon californicum - Yerba Santa
Yerba Santa
Eriodictyon californicum
Best viewed: May-June
Flower size: 1-1.5 cm
Family: Boraginaceae
Habitat: Mixed forest and chaparral
Type: Shrub
Notes: Yerba Santa is very common throughout Whiskeytown. It has a pungent, bitter flavor that many animals avoid, though it has many traditional uses as a medicine.
Dichelostemma ida-maia - Firecracker Flower
Firecracker Flower (Dichelostemma ida-maia)

NPS/Lisa Johnston

Firecracker Flower
Dicholostemma ida-maia
Best viewed: April-June
Flower size: 2-3 cm flowers arranged in an umbel
Family: Themidaceae
Habitat: Found in mixed forests
Type: Perennial herb
Notes: Firecracker flowers are common along Davis Gulch trail.
Dichelostemma capitatum - Bluedicks
Bluedicks (Dichelostemma capitatum)

NPS/Lisa Johnston

Bluedicks
Dichelostemma capitatum
Best viewed: February-April
Flower size: 1-2 cm flowers arranged in an umbel
Family: Themidaceae
Habitat: Disturbed areas and trailsides
Type: Perennial herb
Notes: Common along many trails in burned areas of the park.
Eriophyllum lanatum - Common Woolly Sunflower
Common Wooly Sunflower (Eriophyllum lanatum)

NPS/Lisa Johnston

Common Wooly Sunflower
Eriophyllum lanatum
Best viewed: May-August
Flower size: 2-3 cm
Family: Asteraceae
Habitat: Open sunny slopes and disturbed areas
Type: Perennial herb
Notes: Very common along roadsides, trails and areas opened by fire.
Cat’s Ears Chalochortus tolmiei
Cat’s Ears (Chalochortus tolmiei)

NPS Lisa Johnston

Cat’s Ears
Chalochortus tolmiei
Best viewed: April-June
Flower size: 3-5 cm
Family: Liliaceae
Habitat: Mixed forest and chapparal
Type: Perennial herb
Notes: Cat’s ears are low growing lilies found in shady forest areas.
Pedicularis densiflora - Warrior's Plume
Warrior’s Plume (Pedicularis densiflora)

NPS/Lisa Johnston

Warrior’s Plume
Pedicularis densiflora
Best viewed: January-April
Flower size: Tight clusters of 1-2 cm flowers
Family: Orobanchaceae
Habitat: Chaparral and foothill woodland
Type: Perennial herb
Notes: Warrior’s Plume often parasitizes the roots of woody trees or shrubs to obtain additional nutrients.
Monardella sheltonii - Coyote Mint
Coyote Mint (Monardella sheltonii)

NPS/Lisa Johnston

Coyote Mint
Monardella sheltonii
Best viewed: June-August
Flower size: 1-2 cm
Family: Lamiaceae
Habitat: Chaparral and mixed forest in serpentine soil
Type: Perennial herb
Notes: Coyote mint is common along Crystal Creek Road and South Shore Drive in the summer months.
Scutellaria siphocampyloides - Greyleaf Skullcap
Greyleaf Skullcap (Scutellaria siphocampyloides)

NPS/Lisa Johnston

Greyleaf Skullcap
Scutellaria siphocampyloides
Best viewed: May-September
Flower size: 3-4 cm
Family: Lamiaceae
Habitat: Chaparral and mixed forest communities
Type: Perennial herb
Notes: Greyleaf Skullcap can be seen at stream crossings and in low areas along the Shasta Mine loop trail.
Silene laciniata - California Indian Pink
California Indian Pink (Silene laciniata ssp. Californica)

NPS/Lisa Johnston

California Indian Pink
Silene laciniata ssp. Californica
Best viewed: April-July
Flower size: 2-3 cm
Family: Caryophyllaceae
Habitat: Chaparral and mixed evergreen forest
Type: Perennial herb
Notes: These flowers are common throughout the park, especially along South Shore Drive and Shasta Mine loop trail.
Stryrax redivivus- California Snowdrop
California Snowdrop Bush (Styrax redivivus)

NPS/Lisa Johnston

California Snowdrop Bush
Styrax redivivus
Best viewed: April-May
Flower size: 1.5-2 cm
Family: Styracaceae
Habitat: Chaparral and foothill woodlands
Type: Shrub
Notes: Snowdrops bush is common along the Guardian Rock trail.
Vitis californica - California Grape
California Wild Grape (Vitis californica)

NPS/Lisa Johnston

California Wild Grape
Vitis californica
Best viewed: May-June
Flower size: Clusters of tiny green flowers, mainly composed of filamentous stamens.
Family: Vitaceae
Habitat: Canyons in mixed woodlands
Type: Vine or shrub
Notes: The grapes are edible and, although they don’t make an ideal wine grape, they are hardy. Wine grape varies are often grafted onto California grape root stock for disease resistance. They are commonly seen as a vine growing up through trees and shrubs.
Adenostoma fasciculatum - Chamise
Chamise (Adenostoma fasciculatum)

NPS/Lisa Johnston

Chamise
Adenostoma fasciculatum
Best viewed: June-August
Flower size: Clusters of small flowers
Family: Rosaceae
Habitat: Chaparral
Type: Shrub
Notes: Chamise is an indicator species of certain chaparral ecosystems. Chamise contains flammable oils that burn readily in wildfire. Burls at the base of the shrub often re-sprout after fire.

Last updated: June 29, 2020

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Mailing Address:

P.O. Box 188
Whiskeytown , CA 96095

Phone:

(530) 242-3400

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