Permits & Reservations

Kayaker on the Delaware River.

Special Use Permit (SUP)


"The National Park Service...shall promote and regulate the use of...national parks...[its] purpose is to conserve the scenery and the natural and historic objects and the wildlife therein and to provide for the enjoyment of the same in such manner and by such means as will leave them unimpaired for the enjoyment of future generations." (16 USC 1)

It is the policy of Upper Delaware Scenic and Recreational River to allow special events and activities, filming, and commercial photography when and where possible, while adhering to this mandate. Therefore, primary consideration will be givento potential damage to natural resources and historic objects, and to anticipate disruption of normal public use. In order to manage special use events, filming, and commercial photography, a permit issued by the Superintendent is required.

Application Process:

Read over the information carefully. Complete the appropriate application available below and mail or email it to the Permit Coorinator as soon as possible. Please do not include any fees with your application. Fees will be payable through Pay.gov that will be sent via email with instructions once the application is reviewed. When billed, please be aware that the $100.00 application fee is non-refundable.

Federal procedures (31 USC 7701) and Debt Collection Improvement Act of 1996 requires an Emplorer Identification Number (EIN) or tax identification number. You must supply your EIN or tax identification number on your application to be processed. If you do not have an EIN, the IRS issues EINs for free at the IRS website.

Your application must be received in sufficient time for evaluation (normally 6-8 weeks) by National Park Service staff before the start date for your acivity. Requests which involve complex logistics or coordination with other visitor activities will require additional time to process. Your request will be evaluated based on the information you provide in your application and compliance checklist.

If your request is approved, a permit containing applicable terms and conditions will be sent to the person designated on the application. Additional fees may be charged based on the size and complexity of your permit.

If you have any questions about an event or activity or would like a site visit prior to submitting your application, you can set up an appointment with the Permit Coordinator.

SUP Application and the Compliance Checklist:

 

Filming and Still Photography


Lands of the United States were set aside by Congress, Executive Order, or otherwise acquired in order to conserve and protect areas of untold beauty and grandeur, historical importance, and uniqueness for future generations. The tradition of capturing images of these special places started with explorers who traveled with paint and canvas or primitive photo apparatus. It was the sharing of these images that led to the designation of these areas as national parks and monuments. Visitors to national parks today continue to memorialize their visits through videos and photographs.

FILMING

Changes to Commercial Filming Permits on Park Land
On January 22, 2021, the US District Court for the District of Columbia issued a decision in Price v. Barr determining the permit and fee requirements applying to commercial filming under 54 USC 100905, 43 CFR Part 5, and 36 CFR Part 5.5 are unconstitutional. In response to the decision, the National Park Service issued interim guidance on February 22, 2021, to manage filming activities. Under the interim guidance, filming activities may require a permit if they would impact park resources or the visitor experience. The National Park Service intends to update regulations addressing filming activities that are consistent with the outcome of Price v. Barr. Once effective, those regulations will replace and supersede the interim guidance.

Those interested in commercial filming activities on land managed by the National Park Service are encouraged to contact the park directly for more information about filming in the park and to discuss how to minimize potential impacts to visitors and sensitive park resources.

Do I need a permit to film?
Under the interim guidance, the National Park Service is not distinguishing between types of filming, such as commercial, non-commercial, or news gathering. Low-impact filming activities will not require a special use permit, but non-low-impact filming activities may require a permit to address their potential impacts on park resources and visitor activities.

Low-Impact Filming
“Low-impact filming’ is defined as outdoor filming activities in areas open to the public, except areas managed as wilderness, involving five people or less and equipment that will be carried at all times, except for small tripods used to hold cameras. Those participating in low-impact filming activities do not need a permit and are not required to contact the park in advance. If low-impact filmers have questions about areas where they want to film, they should contact the park directly.

Videographers, filmers, producers, directors, news and other staff associated with filming are reminded that rules and regulations that apply to all park visitors, including park hours and closed areas, still apply to filming activities even if a permit is not required. Check with the park staff for more information on closures, sensitive resources, and other safety tips.

Non-Low-Impact Filming
Filming activities that do not meet the description of low-impact filming require at least ten days advance notice to the National Park Service by contacting the park directly in writing. The park’s superintendent will determine whether the filming activities will require a special use permit for filming. Based on the information provided, a permit may be required to:
- maintain public health and safety;
- protect environmental or scenic values;
- protect natural or cultural resources;
- allow for equitable allocation or use of facilities; or
- avoid conflict among visitor use activities.

Examples of requests that may require a permit include, but are not limited to: entering a sensitive resource area, filming in areas that require tickets to enter, or filming in visitor centers, campgrounds, or other visitor areas. The decision to require a permit rests with the park superintendent based on potential impacts to park resources or the visitor experience.

Contact the park directly if unsure whether or not a filming activity is considered low-impact or may require a permit.

Filming in Wilderness Areas
The National Park Service manages and protects more than 67 million acres of park lands and waters as wilderness areas. These areas have additional laws and policies to preserve their wilderness character for future generations. Filming activities in wilderness areas must follow all applicable laws and regulations that govern wilderness areas in the park, including prohibitions on structures, installations, motor vehicles, mechanical transport, motorized equipment, motorboats, or landing of aircrafts.

Except for casual filming by visitors, special use permits for filming are required for all filming activities in wilderness areas, no matter the group size or equipment used.

Are filmers still required to pay fees to film in parks?
Under the interim guidance issued on January 22, 2021, the National Park Service is not collecting application or location fees, or cost recovery for filming activities.

STILL PHOTOGRAPHY
When is a permit needed?
Price v. Barr had no impact on how the National Park Service regulates still photography, so there are no changes in how the National Park Service regulates that activity. Still photographers require a permit only when:

1) the activity takes place at location(s) where or when members of the public are generally not allowed; or
2) the activity uses model(s), sets(s), or prop(s) that are not a part of the location's natural or cultural resources or administrative facilities; or
3) a park would incur additional administrative costs to monitor the activity.

Lands of the United States were set aside by Congress, Executive Order, or otherwise acquired in order to conserve and protect areas of untold beauty and grandeur, historical importance, and uniqueness for future generations. The tradition of capturing images of these special places started with explorers who traveled with paint and canvas or primitive photo apparatus. It was the sharing of these images that led to the designation of these areas as national parks and monuments. Visitors to national parks today continue to memorialize their visits through videos and photographs.
 

First Amendment:

More information and locations can be found in the Superintendent's Compendium

 

Contact Information:


Permit Coordinator
Upper Delaware S&RR
Beach Lake, PA 18405
(570) 729-7134, ext. 2234

Last updated: September 24, 2021

Contact the Park

Mailing Address:

274 River Road
Beach Lake, PA 18405

Phone:

(570) 685-4871

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