Off the Beaten Path

Get off the road. Get off the paved trail. Go for an adventure.

Ask for the routes below at the visitor centers. Route finding skills will be used and distances are approximate. Please remember that you must be parked safely and legally.

Please take care of the vulnerable resources located throughout the park. Removing anything or digging up anything (even partially exposed) is strictly prohibited. Climbing on the badlands can cause significant damage that will leave a long-lasting effect on the environment. This ultimately effects the pristine landscape we all appreciate and love. Thank you for helping us maintain this incredible area.

 
Hoodoos near Billings Gap glowing in late afternoon
Hoodoos near Billings Gap glowing in late afternoon

NPS

Billings Gap
This 3-mile (4.8 km) hike takes you to a great viewpoint of the Billings Gap area between Blue Mesa and the landform to the east. This hike follows the steep edge of Blue Mesa, and offers views of badlands to the east, and also the broad grassy valleys to north and south. The badlands’ blues, purples, grays and whites seem to shift throughout the day and with the seasons. The summer monsoon adds a touch of green vegetation and wildflowers.

 
Bluish badlands along the historic Blue Forest Trail
Bluish badlands along the historic Blue Forest Trail

NPS

The Blue Forest Trail
The Blue Forest Trail was constructed between 1934 and 1937 by the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC), which connected the lower and upper Blue Mesa roads. In 1955 the trail and the lower road were closed and replaced by the Blue Mesa Loop Trail. In 2013 the Blue Forest Trail was re-established for adventurous hikers. The trail connects the main park road at the Tepees area to the paved Blue Mesa Loop Trail. It is accessed from the Blue Mesa Loop Road.

The 3-mile (4.8 km) round trip Blue Forest Trail winds through colorful blue and white badland hills. It offers a new view at every turn, and both the foreground and background hold your interest at every step. It gives the hiker a bit of history, a lot of scenery, an intimate look at petrified wood being exposed by erosion, and with the help provided here, a short geology lesson. Through the combination of these elements, the Blue Forest Trail exemplifies the essence of Petrified Forest National Park.

 
Dead Wash View across grasslands
Dead Wash View across Grasslands

NPS

Dead Wash Overlook Hike
This 4-mile (6.4 km) round trip hike will take you through the grassland, over the edge of a bluff east of the main park road, past Black Forest petrified wood, and out to an overlook with a broad view to the east and south across the Dead Wash drainage. It involves scrambling up and down boulders into washes, and is considered a moderately difficult hike.

 
Hoodoos tower at Devil's Playground
Hoodoos tower at Devil's Playground

NPS

Devil's Playground
This beautiful and remote part of the park is in the Petrified Forest National Wilderness Area. The landscape is highly eroded into fanciful shapes and banded with gray, purple, and blue.

Three permits are available each week on a first-come-first-serve basis. You may call the visitor center at 928 524-6228 x236 to find out the status of these permits. Permits cannot be set aside or saved. Please note that visitors take the access road to Devil's Playground at their own risk, particularly in or after inclement weather.

 
View from bluffs overlooking Jasper Forest
View from bluffs overlooking Jasper Forest

NPS

First Forest Point
Your adventure will begin in the parking lot at the Jasper Forest overlook and will end with a spectacular view atop a prominent mesa. Along your 2.1-miles (3.4 km) round trip route you will see giant sandstone boulders, and spectacular sparkling petrified wood. For the keen observer/adventurer you may even stumble upon a few seldom seen petroglyphs.

In the 1890s and early 1900s this area was called “First Forest”. This is the first stop for early tourists who came by wagon from the train depot at Adamana. What a spectacular introduction to the eroded and still eroding petrified wood that had been entombed in sandstone for millions of years! The geology and fossils (yes, the petrified wood is a fossil) that you will enjoy along the way are about 217 million years old.

 
Petrified log in front of a banded badland at Jasper Forest
Petrified log in front of a banded badland at Jasper Forest

NPS

Jasper Forest Hike
This 2.5-mile (4 km) round trip hike into Jasper Forest along an old 1930’s road is a nice stroll through an incredible garden of petrified wood. This area was originally called “First Forest” because it was the first collection of petrified wood that travelers encountered when they came by wagon from the Adamana train station. The road within Jasper Forest was added later for car traffic to Eagle’s Nest Rock. A once popular destination, Eagle’s Nest Rock was a large, solitary hoodoo found within an amphitheater of colorful badlands. After the road was closed, it was allowed to erode away.

 
Onyx Bridge, a long petrified log, stretches across a wash
Onyx Bridge, a long petrified log, stretches across a wash

NPS

Onyx Bridge Hike
This 4-miles (6.4 km) round trip hike takes you to a dramatic example of petrified wood eroding out of the Black Forest Bed of the Chinle Formation. The Triassic conifer tree, known as Onyx Bridge, is one of the many preserved logs in the Black Forest. These logs and the geologic layer in which they are found in are about 210 million years old.

 
Hikers crossing badlands in the Red Basin area
Hikers crossing badlands in the Red Basin area

NPS

Red Basin Clam Beds Hike
The Red Basin is a fossil-rich area part of the land within the 2004 boundary expansion of Petrified Forest National Park. Along this 8.5-miles (13.7 km) round trip hike you will see petrified wood, petroglyphs, unique erosional formations such as hoodoos, vibrantly colored badlands deposited over 215 million years ago, and fossil clam beds.

 
Two hikers looking up at a large petrified log on a hill
Hikers in the wilderness area

NPS

Wilderness Loop
This 7-miles (11.3 km) round trip hike takes you to several petrified “forests” eroding out of the Black Forest bed in the Petrified Forest Member of the Chinle Formation. These logs and the geologic layer in which they are found in are about 210 million years old.

Last updated: September 24, 2020

Contact the Park

Mailing Address:

1 Park Road, #2217
Petrified Forest, AZ 86028

Phone:

(928) 524-6228

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