Superintendent's Compendium

Craters of the Moon National Monument and Preserve

Superintendent’s Compendium Of Designations, Closures, Permit Requirements and Other Restrictions

Imposed Under Discretionary Authority

Approved:
/s/ Wade Vagias 8/03/2017
Superintendent

Introduction to the Compendium

The Superintendent’s Compendium is the summary of park specific rules implemented under 36 Code of Federal Regulations (36 CFR). It serves as public notice, identifies areas closed for public use, provides a list of activities requiring either a special use permit or reservation, and elaborates on public use and resource protection regulations pertaining specifically to the administration of the park. The Superintendent’s Compendium does not replace regulations found in 36 CFR and other United States Code and CFR Titles, which are enforced without further elaboration at the park level.

The regulations contained in 36 CFR, Parts 1-7, are the basic mechanism used by the National Park Service (NPS) to preserve and protect the natural and cultural resources of the park and to protect visitors and property within the park. Parts 1 through 6 are general regulations applicable to all areas of the National Park system, and Part 7 contains special regulations specific to individual parks. Each of these Parts has many sections and subsections articulating specific provisions. Within some of these Part 1-7 sections and subsections, the Superintendent is granted discretionary authority to develop local rules to be responsive to the needs of a specific park resource or activity, park plan, program, and/or special needs of the general public.

As an example, 36 CFR 1.5(a) Closures and Public Use Limits provides the Superintendent certain discretion in allowing or disallowing certain activities. The authority granted by the Section, however, requires the Superintendent to comply with the Administrative Procedures Act (6 USC Section 551), which requires public notice on actions with major impact on visitor use patterns, park resources, or those that are highly controversial in nature.

Another example is 36 CFR 1.6 Permits, which allows the Superintendent to require a permit for certain uses and activities in the park. This Section requires that a list of activities needing a permit (and a fee schedule for the various types of permits) be maintained by the park.

This Compendium should be used in conjunction with Title 36 CFR, Parts 1-7, to more fully understand the regulations governing the use and enjoyment of all areas of the National Park System.

Information on purchasing a copy of Title 36 CFR is available by contacting the U.S. Government Printing Office at 1-866-512-1800 or by via email at e-mail us


Laws and Policies Allowing the Superintendent to Develop This Compendium

In December 2014, Congress enacted Title 54 United States Code (54 U.S.C.), entitled National Park Service and Related Programs, which is a compilation of laws applicable to the National Park Service. Title 54 conforms to the understood policy, intent, and purpose of Congress in the original enactments governing the Agency. Previous laws that existed under Title 16, such as the National Park Service Organic Act, the National Park System General Authorities Act and the Historic Preservation Act, were repealed and are now found in Title 54.

The National Park Service (NPS) is granted broad statutory authority under 54 United States Code (U.S.C.) to “promote and regulate the use of the National Park System by means and measures that conform to the fundamental purpose of the System units, which purpose is to conserve the scenery, natural and historic objects,

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and the wildlife in such manner and by such means as will leave them unimpaired for the enjoyment for future generations.” (54 U.S.C.§100101(a)).

In addition, 54 U.S.C.§100751(a) allows the NPS through the Secretary of the Interior to “prescribe such regulations as the Secretary considers necessary or proper for the use and management of System units”.

54 U.S.C.§100101(b) reaffirms the original intent of Congress in the establishment of the National Park Service by recognizing “… these areas, though distinct in character, are united through their interrelated purposes and resources into one National Park System as cumulative expressions of a single national heritage…”

54 U.S.C.§100101(2) reaffirms the high standard of protection defined in the original Organic Act by stating “Congress further reaffirms , declares, and directs that the promotion and regulation of the various System units, shall be consistent with and founded in the purpose established by subsection (a), to the common benefit of all people of the United States.”

54 U.S.C.§100501 defines the National Park System as, “any areas of land and water now or hereafter administered by the Secretary of the Interior through the National Park Service for park, monument, historic, parkway, recreational, or other purposes.”

In addition to the above statutory authority, the Superintendent is guided by established NPS policy as found in the NPS Management Policies (2006). The Superintendent is also guided by more specific policies promulgated by the Director of the National Park Service, in the form of Director’s Orders. As stated in the Management Policies, the primary responsibility of the NPS is to protect and preserve our national natural and cultural resources while providing for the enjoyment of these resources by visitor and other users, as long as use does not impair specific park resources or overall visitor experience. The appropriateness of any particular visitor use or recreational experience is resource-based and will vary from park to park: therefore, a use or activity that is appropriate in one park area may not be appropriate in another. The Superintendent is directed to analyze overall park use and determine if any particular use is appropriate. When conflict arises between use and resource protection, and the Superintendent has a reasonable basis to believe a resource is or would become impaired, and then the Superintendent is obliged to place limitations on public use.

Consistency of This Compendium with Applicable Federal Law and Requirements

The Superintendent’s Compendium is not considered a significant rule requiring review by the Office of Management and Budget under Executive Order 12866. In addition, the Compendium will not have a significant economic effect on a number of small entities nor impose a significant cost on any local, state, tribal government or private organization, and therefore does not fall under the requirements of either the Regulatory Flexibility Act or the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act.

The actions and requirements described in this Compendium are found to be categorically excluded from further compliance with the procedural requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) in Department of the Interior (DOI) Guidelines 516 DM 6 and as such, an Environmental Assessment will not be prepared.

Development of the Requirements of the Superintendent’s Compendium

As outlined above, the NPS has broad authority and responsibility to determine what types of uses and activities are appropriate in any particular National Park System area. The requirements of the Superintendent’s Compendium are developed through an analysis and determination process. The decision criteria used during this process are:

  • Is the use or activity consistent with NPS Organic Act and NPS policy?
  • Is the use or activity consistent and compatible with the park’s enabling legislation, management objectives, and corresponding management plans?
  • Will the use or activity damage the park’s protected natural and cultural resources and other protected values?
  • Will the use or activity conflict with or be incompatible with traditional park uses and activities?
  • Will the use or activity disturb or be in conflict with wildlife, vegetation, and environmental protection actions and values?
  • Will the use or activity compromise employee or public safety?


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Applicability of the Compendium

The rules contained in this Compendium apply to all persons entering, using, visiting, or otherwise present on federally owned lands administered by the NPS within the legislative boundaries of the park.

Enforcement of Compendium Requirements

NPS Law Enforcement Park Rangers enforce the requirements of the United States Code, 36 CFR, and this Superintendent’s Compendium.

Penalties for Not Adhering to the Compendium Requirements

A person who violates any provision of the regulations found in 36 CFR, Parts 1-7, or provisions of this Compendium, is subject to a fine as provided by law (18 U.S.C§3571) up to $5,000 for individuals and $10,000 for organizations, or by imprisonment not exceeding six months (18 U.S.C.§3559), or both, and shall be adjudged to pay all court costs associated with any court proceedings. You may receive a list of fines associated with any particular provision by contacting the Chief Ranger at the park address below.

Comments on the Compendium

The Compendium is reviewed annually and revised as necessary. The park welcomes comments about its programs and activities at any time. Written comments on the Compendium may be submitted to:

Superintendent
Craters of the Moon National Monument and Preserve
P.O. Box 29
Arco, Idaho 83213

Effective Date of the Superintendent’s Compendium

The Superintendent’s Compendium is effective on the approval dated listed on the first page of this document, and remains in effect until revised.

Additional Information

Some of the terms used in this Compendium have specific meaning defined in definitions starting on page 28.

Availability

Copies of this Compendium are available at the park visitor center. It may also be found at the park’s website at http://www.nps.gov/crmo/learn/management/lawsandpolicies.htm


SUPERINTENDENT’S COMPENDIUM

In accordance with regulations and the delegated authority provided in Title 36, Code of Federal Regulations (36 CFR), Chapter 1, Parts 1-7, authorized by Title 54 United States Code § 100751, the following provisions apply to all lands and waters administered by the National Park Service, within the boundaries of Craters of the Moon National Monument and Preserve (CRMO). Unless otherwise stated, these regulatory provisions apply in addition to the requirements contained in 36 CFR, Chapter 1, Parts 1-7.

Written determinations, which explain the reasoning behind the Superintendent’s use of discretionary authority, as required by Section 1.5(c), appear in this document identified by italicized print.

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CRATERS OF THE MOON NATIONAL MONUMENT AND PRESERVE

COMPENDIUM

Table of Contents

Closures and Public Use Limits

Section 1.5 - Visiting Hours, Public Use Limits, and Closures...............................5

Section 1.6 - Permits..............................................................................................9

Resource Protection, Public Use, and Recreation

Section 2.2 - Wildlife Protection.............................................................................10

Section 2.4 - Weapons, Traps, and Nets.............................................................. 10

Section 2.5 - Research Specimens.......................................................................10

Section 2.10 - Camping.........................................................................................10

Section 2.13 - Fires................................................................................................11

Section 2.15 - Pets................................................................................................12

Section 2.16 - Horses and Pack Animals..............................................................13

Section 2.19 - Winter Activities..............................................................................13

Section 2.21 - Smoking.........................................................................................13

Section 2.23 - Recreation Fees.............................................................................14

Section 2.35 - Alcoholic Beverages and Controlled Substances...........................15

Section 2.51 - Demonstrations..............................................................................15

Section 2.52 - Sale or Distribution of Printed Matter..............................................15

Section 2.62 - Memorialization..............................................................................15

Vehicles and Traffic Safety

Section 4.11 - Load, Weight and Size Limits.........................................................16

Section 4.21 - Speed Limits...................................................................................16

Section 4.30 - Bicycles..........................................................................................16

Attachments

Maps

North End Closure.................................................................................................17

Big Craters/Spatter Cones.....................................................................................19

Designated Stock Use Trail...................................................................................21

1st Amendment Sites............................................................................................22

Definitions..............................................................................................................23


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36 CFR § 1.5 – VISITING HOURS, PUBLIC USE LIMITS, CLOSURES, AND AREA DESIGNATIONS FOR SPECIFIC USES OR ACTIVITIES

(a)(1) The following visiting hours, public use limits, and closures are established:

Visiting Hours:

  • The Monument and Preserve is open every day of the year, 24 hours a day.
  • CRMO Park Visitor Center is open 7 days a week from 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. (6 p.m. in the summer).
  • Developed campground is open year round unless otherwise posted.

Determination: These operational needs are set to balance the needs of public access, visitor safety, and protection of property.

Public Use Limits—Pursuant to §1.5(d) to implement a public use limit, the Superintendent may establish a permit, registration, or reservations system:

  • The maximum number of people permitted to occupy the Group Campsite is 30.

Determination: This group size limit is due to the parking and tent site capacity of the Group Camp.

  • The maximum number of people permitted to occupy a campsite within the Lava Flow campground is 8.

Determination: This size limit is due to the parking and tent site capacity of the campground.

  • A maximum group size of eight (8) applies to overnight camping in the Wilderness. No more than a total of 10 overnight Wilderness permits will be issued on any given night with only four being issued within Echo Crater.

Determination: This limit is for resource protection and visitor enjoyment.

  • Limit of 12 stock animals per backcountry permit issued for day use of pack stock.

Determination: This limit on the size of stock groups protects resources by limiting trampling and conflicts between riders and other trail users as well as maintains outstanding opportunities for solitude.

  • A valid day-use backcountry permit is required for all persons to access the National Monument lands north of Highway 93.

Determination: Access to the North End requires a valid National Park Service backcountry permit. Public access to all areas of the National Monument north of Highway 20/26, 93 is restricted to protect sensitive biological resources and park infrastructure.

Public travel within the North End area is restricted to foot travel during daytime hours (sun-up to sun down). Groups authorized to camp in the Group Campsite may only operate motor vehicles on the road to and from the highway to the Group Campsite. Any access beyond the Group Campsite requires a day use backcountry permit. Day use backcountry permits for access to the North End are available without charge at the Visitor Center during normal business hours. For visitor safety reasons, day use backcountry permits will not be issued during Idaho’s Regular Deer Tag Season on adjoining lands. Day use backcountry permits will also not be issued during peak pronghorn migration periods (February 25th-April 7th and September 25th-November 15th.

See map on page 17.


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Closures:

  • Launching, landing or operating an unmanned aircraft from or on lands and waters administered by the National Park Service within the boundaries of Craters of the Moon National Monument and Preserve is prohibited except as approved in writing by the Superintendent.

Determination: The unrestricted use of unmanned aircraft is incompatible with the mission to protect park resources and to ensure visitor enjoyment within the park. Unrestricted use of unmanned aircraft could impact sensitive wildlife, result in unnecessary noise, and pose a potential danger to park visitors. This prohibition complies with the NPS Director’s Policy Memorandum 14-05 (Unmanned Aircraft--Interim Policy; June 19, 2014).

  • Operation of motorized vehicles not licensed for highway use, including all off-road motorized vehicles, on all park roads is prohibited.

Determination: Off-road motor vehicles including ATVs and UTVs are not designed for use on paved or public roads.

  • Any area closed by the Superintendent and identified with an official sign is prohibited to public access. This includes all park maintenance compounds, employee housing facilities, outbuildings and service roads that are only used for official business.

Determination: Areas may be temporarily closed for a variety of reasons including site restoration, protection of endangered or threatened animal and plant species, protection of fragile cultural and/or historic sites, and for visitor safety. Maintenance compounds and other work areas are restricted from public access to protect government property from theft and vandalism and to prevent safety issues related to the operation of heavy machinery and power equipment.

  • The 7 mile Loop Road and Lava Flow campground or portions thereof are closed to motor vehicles in the winter. Closure dates and specific locations will depend on weather and/or road conditions. Closures are in effect when posted by signs, barricades, and/or locked gates.

Determination: This closure is necessary for public safety.

  • All caves within the boundary of Craters of the Moon National Monument and Preserve (with the exception of Indian Tunnel, Beauty, Boy Scout, Dew Drop and Buffalo Cave) are closed.

Determination: The closure of all caves (with the exception of the five caves listed above that can be accessed with a valid cave permit) is the best available method to meet the National Park Service mission to protect park resources for the enjoyment of future generations. CRMO is mandated through its enabling legislation to preserve caves, and is directed by the Federal Cave Resources Protection Act of 1988 to protect them. Cave permits are established to protect the fragile ecosystems and resources within the caves and to minimize negative impacts upon any endangered or threatened resource. See map on page 21.

  • Craters of the Moon National Monument is closed to hunting and the taking of wildlife (NPS).

Determination: CRMO’s enabling legislation prohibits hunting and trapping within the boundaries of the Monument and prohibits trapping in the Preserve.

  • The use of wildlife and/or varmint calls, audio attractants or other artificial or natural means of attracting or disturbing wildlife are prohibited within Craters of the Moon National Monument.

Determination: This prohibition is required to prevent disturbance of wildlife.

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(a)(2) The following areas are designated for a specific use or activity and/or the following conditions or restrictions are imposed on a specific use or activity:

  • Recreational caving is permitted with a valid cave permit in the following caves: Indian Tunnel, Beauty, Boy Scout, Dew Drop, Buffalo Cave along the Broken Top Trail

Determination: Cave permits are established to protect the fragile ecosystems and resources within the caves and to minimize negative impacts upon any endangered or threatened resource. See map on page 21.

White Nose Syndrome is a threat to the cave bats of Craters of the Moon National Monument and Preserve, and every effort should be made to prevent or slow its spread to the park. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, as the lead federal agency in wildlife conservation, has issued protocols that are designed to prevent the spread of the suspected causative agent of the syndrome.

First documented in New York in 2006, White Nose Syndrome has spread rapidly across the United States, killing more than six million bats. The fungus associated with White Nose Syndrome, Pseudogymnoascus destructans, has now been detected as far west as Texas, has jumped to Washington State, and is expected to continue spreading. While the fungus is transmitted primarily by bat to bat contact biologists suspect it could be transmitted inadvertently by humans. Fungal spores can be transferred from cave sediment to clothing and equipment, and transported to unaffected areas. In response to White Nose Syndrome, The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service implemented at a nation-wide closure of all caves within the National Wildlife Refuge System in September 2010. In August 2010, the U.S. Forest Service implemented a Forest-wide closure of caves on the Caribou-Targhee National Forest in eastern Idaho.

  • Camping outside of designated areas within Craters of the Moon National Monument without a valid backcountry camping permit is prohibited. Refer to §2.10 pg 10 for detailed camping area designations.

Determination: Camping outside of designated camping areas and without a permit poses a threat to natural and cultural resources within the monument.

  • Geo-Caching – Park visitors participating in the practice of geo-caching are restricted to using “virtual” caches only. Virtual caches consist of providing GPS coordinates to existing points of interest, such as geologic or cultural feature, wayside exhibit, or other object. Virtual caches do not involve a physical cache. Any other form of caching is prohibited.

Determination: Virtual caching provides a significant recreational and educational value to visitors. Allowing the use of virtual caches does not impact the protection of park resources.

  • Passenger Carrying Busses engines must be shut down when not underway.

Determination: The idling of bus engines adds unnecessary exhaust fumes to the air and diminishes the enjoyment by visitors of the peace and tranquility of the park.

  • Commercial vehicles exceeding 8 Feet 6 inches in width, or longer than 75 feet are not permitted on the 7 Mile Loop Road past the Visitor Center unless authorized by the Superintendent.

Determination: This closure to over-sized vehicles is required due to the narrow and confined road widths found in many sections of the loop road.

  • The use of a Segway® or similar gyroscopically controlled devices in lieu of manual or motorized wheelchairs is allowed by persons with disabilities who would otherwise only have the option of using a manual or powered wheelchair with the following restrictions:

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  • A person using a Segway® or similar gyroscopically controlled device in Craters of the Moon National Monument and Preserve is permitted if medically determined to have a permanent disability and provides documentation upon request (such as from a Federal or State agency).
  • Segways may be used in front country areas on sidewalks, formalized paved overlooks and campgrounds.
  • Segways may not be operated along the edges of major roads, or used on major roads (due to congestion, visibility and speeds of vehicles operating in these areas).
  • Operators will be required to travel at a speed no faster than a walking pace for visitor safety.

Determination: Segways are adopted as a mode of conveyance by people with disabilities and allowing such use provides access for a mobility impaired person and gives them the same opportunities as other visitors to enjoy park experiences. Operator restrictions are required to enhance the safety of the general public and the Segway operator.

  • E-cigarettes – The use of e-cigarettes and other Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems (ENDS) is prohibited in all public buildings, offices, government vehicles, caves, and the Lava Flow campground amphitheater.

Determination: Restrictions are required to protect employees and visitors from second-hand nicotine. The use of ENDS is prohibited in areas where smoking is restricted by Management Policies (2006) and Director’s Order #50D (Smoking Policy). The NPS is moving forward with revising the current regulation of 36 CFR 1.4 to include the use of ENDS in the definition of smoking. Once promulgated, section 2.21 will apply to the smoking of tobacco and the use of ENDS.

  • Transport of hazardous, combustible or flammable petroleum products in commercial vehicles is prohibited on the 7 Mile Loop Drive past the Visitor Center parking area unless authorized by the Superintendent.

Determination: This closure is needed to protect resources from spills resulting from vehicle accidents on the narrow width loop road.

  • Off-trail travel is prohibited in the Spatter Cones/Big Craters area and in the North Crater Flow Trail area.

Determination: See determination on page 18 and map on page 19.


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36 CFR §1.6 – ACTIVITIES THAT REQUIRE A PERMIT

Activities requiring a permit are listed below under 36 CFR § 1.5 and throughout this document under the specific 36 CFR Section that authorizes or requires the issuance of a permit.

(f) A compilation of those activities requiring a permit shall be maintained by the Superintendent and available to the public upon request.

A permit is required for:

  • §1.5(a)(1) The following activities related to Public Use Limits:
  • Access to National Monument land north of Highway 20/26/93 (excluding lands within Craters of the Moon National Preserve)
    • Use of stock animals
  • §1.5(a)(2) Accessing any cave
  • §1.5(a)(1) Unmanned Aircraft Systems
  • §2.5(a) Specimen collection (taking plant, fish, wildlife, rocks or minerals)
  • §2.10(a) Camping
  • 2.50(a) Special events (such as sports event, pageant, public spectator attraction, entertainment, wedding, ceremony, and similar events)
  • §2.51(a) Public assemblies, meetings, gatherings, demonstrations, parades and other public expressions of views (groups sizes of 25 or less do not require a permit)
  • §2.52(c) Sale or distribution of printed matter that is not solely commercial advertising
  • §2.62(b) Memorialization (Scattering ashes from human cremation)
  • §5.1 Advertisements (Display, posting or distribution)
  • §5.3 Engaging in or soliciting any business (requires a permit, contract or other written agreement with the United States, or must be pursuant to special regulations)
  • §5.5(a) Commercial filming of motion pictures or television involving the use of professional casts, settings or crews, other than bona fide newsreel or news television

(b) Still photography of vehicles, or other articles of commerce or models for the purpose of commercial advertising

Permit Information:

Special regulations, restrictions and fees may apply when applying for a special use permit. Information regarding permits is available at park headquarters during normal business or calling 208-527-1300 or can be found at on the park’s web site at https://www.nps.gov/crmo/planyourvisit/permits-reservations.htm

Written requests can be mailed to the following address:

Superintendent

Craters of the Moon National Monument and Preserve

P.O. Box 29

Arco, ID 83213

Permits may be denied/terminated based on 36 CFR 1.6 (a), (d), (e), (g)(1), (g)(2), and/or (h). Federal law and agency policy require that certain activities that fall outside the scope of normal visitation be managed through the issuance of a permit. Permits may only be issued if the activity is in keeping with the purpose of the park and will not cause damage to the resources or conflict with other park users.

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Relevant CFR Regulations:

36 CFR §2.2 - WILDLIFE PROTECTION

(d) The following conditions and procedures for transporting lawfully taken wildlife through the park area are in place:

  • Lawfully taken wildlife may be transported through the park in accordance with Idaho State Wildlife Code § 36-502.
  • Any carcass must be properly tagged.

(e) The following areas are closed to the viewing of wildlife with the use of an artificial light:

  • Monument and Preserve wide - the viewing of wildlife at night with the use of an artificial light, headlight, infrared light/beam or spotlight is prohibited unless used in support of hunting in the Preserve in accordance with Idaho state law.

Determination: This restriction is required to prevent disturbance of wildlife and deter poaching.

36 CFR §2.4 – WEAPONS, TRAPS AND NETS

(a)(2)(i) Weapons, traps, or nets may only be carried, possessed or used at the following designated times and locations:

  • In accordance with Idaho State Law, except as otherwise prohibited by applicable Federal Law.
  • Firearms are prohibited in facilities owned or leased by the Federal government where Federal employees are regularly present for performing their duties. These facilities are posted with signs informing the public that firearms are prohibited in these buildings.

36 CFR §2.5 – RESEARCH SPECIMENS

(a) Taking plants, fish, wildlife, rocks or minerals is prohibited except in accordance with other regulations of Chapter I of 36 CFR or pursuant to the terms and conditions of a specimen collection permit. See 36 CFR § 2.5(b) for permitting criteria.

  • An approved specimen collecting permit is required from the Superintendent.

36 CFR §2.10 – CAMPING AND FOOD STORAGE

(a) Camping is allowed in the following designated sites or areas and is subject to the following established conditions:

  • Designated sites within Lava Flow Campground with a camping permit.
  • Group Site with a camping permit.
  • Backcountry camping is permitted in the wilderness with a backcountry permit.
  • Backcountry camping is permitted in the Devil’s Orchard, Tree Molds and Caves parking areas with a backcountry permit during the winter closure of the Craters Scenic Loop Drive due to snow.
  • Lava Flow Campground is a first come – first served basis, must register and pay for their campsite at the self-service pay station, prior to camping. No reservations accepted.
  • Group Campground is by reservation only through Recreation.gov.


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  • Camping stays are limited to 14 days in any 30-day period throughout the park and preserve, with said period to commence the date the site is occupied. All camping equipment, including vehicles, must be removed from the camping area at the end of such 14 day period.
  • Camping equipment, including vehicles, campers and trailers, must not be left unattended for longer than 24 hours.
  • Campsites are limited to a maximum of 8 people, 2 tents, and 2 vehicles, unless otherwise posted.
  • Group campsites are limited to 30 people.
  • Checkout time for leaving campsites is at noon.
  • Camping inside caves or within 50 feet of the mouth of caves is prohibited.
  • All vehicles in the Lava Flow campground must remain on paved roads and be parked on the paved parking pad and does not block or impede traffic flow in the campground.

(d) Conditions for the storage of food are in effect as designated below:

  • In all developed camping areas, food items and garbage, when not in use or attended, must be stored in a vehicle or camping unit made of solid, non-pliable material, in designated food storage lockers, or in the case of garbage (waste food and empty food containers and wrappers) in bear resistant trash receptacles. Equipment used to cook (dirty tableware or cookware) must be washed or stored as a food item. Food items also include toothpastes, hair care products, soaps, vitamins, and supplements.
  • In developed areas, all food items must be stored in one of the following;
  • Bear resistant food storage lockers where provided.
  • Inside of a building.
  • Inside of a hard sided vehicle with doors and windows closed..

36 CFR 2.13 – FIRES

(a)(1) The lighting or maintaining of fires is prohibited, except in the following areas and/or receptacles, and under the conditions noted:

Designated Areas:

  • Lava Flow Campground fire grills - charcoal only.
  • Established outdoor fire rings at government housing or designated campsites.
  • Wood stoves in government buildings.

Receptacles Allowed:

  • Fire Grills in Campground.
  • Wood stoves in government buildings.

Established Conditions for Fires:

  • The burning of metal, aluminum, plastic, glass, or any other type of hazardous material is prohibited.
  • During periods of elevated fire danger; open fires will be restricted or prohibited in accordance with the park’s fire management plan. Notice of any fire restrictions will be posted at the visitor center, entrance station, and other major public uses areas.


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Determination: Fire use limitations are required to protect natural vegetation from being gathered for firewood and prevent wildfires.

(a)(2) The following restrictions are in effect for the use of stoves or lanterns:

  • Lanterns using liquid fuel or compressed gas are not permitted in caves.

Determination: Limitations on use of lanterns fueled by liquid or compressed gas are to protect the public from carbon monoxide poisoning caused by burning fuel in a confined space.

(b) Fires must be extinguished according to the following conditions:

· All campfires and cook-fires will be extinguished and free of litter before any site is left unattended.

(c) During periods of high fire danger, the following areas of the park are closed to the lighting or maintaining of a fire.

· Lava Flow Campground

· Group Campground

· Backcountry sites


36 CFR §2.15 – PETS

(a)(1) Possessing pets in public buildings, public transportation vehicles, and the following structures and/or areas is prohibited:

  • In all public buildings, except for certified service animals who accompany persons with disabilities per the American Disability Act.
  • Beyond 100 feet of the edge of established roads, parking areas, campgrounds, and picnic areas.
  • Picnic area at park headquarters.
  • Backcountry and established trails.
  • Loop road during winter grooming maintenance operations

(a)(5) Pet excrement must be disposed of in accordance with the following conditions:

  • Pet excrement must be immediately collected and disposed of in the nearest trash receptacle.

(b) The use of dogs in support of hunting must be in accordance with Federal and State laws and the following conditions:

  • Are permitted only within the National Preserve unconstrained and/or off-leash while being used in the support of hunting in accordance with Idaho State law.

(e) Pets may be kept by park residents under the following conditions:

  • Permanent employees are allowed no more than two pets.
  • Pets are not allowed in seasonal quarters.

(f) This selection does not apply to dogs used by authorized Federal, State, and local officers in the performance of their duties.

Determination: Restrictions on pets are required to protect wildlife from being chased or harassed by unrestrained pets.


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36 CFR §2.16 – HORSES AND PACK ANIMALS

  1. The use of animals other than those designated as “pack animals” for purposes of transporting equipment is prohibited. The following animals are designated as pack animals for purposes of transporting equipment:
    Horses, Burros, Mules, Llamas, Goats
  1. The use of horses or pack animals outside of the following trails, routes or areas designated for their use:
  • Wilderness Trail (Tree Molds trailhead to/near Sentinel Butte)

(g) Other conditions concerning the use of horses or pack animals:

  • No feed for stock animals shall be provided in the park.
  • Weed-free feed is required and must be fed to pack animals three days prior to entering the park.
  • No grazing of stock animals in the park.
  • Backcountry use with pack stock limited to the period between sunrise and sunset.
  • Pack animals are not permitted in designated campgrounds or campsites.
  • Tying stock to any feature resulting in injury or damage to the feature, vegetation or soil is prohibited
  • Day use backcountry permit is required.

Determination: Limitations on stock use are required to protect native vegetation and minimize the introduction of exotic invasive weeds. See map on page 21.


36 CFR §2.19 – WINTER ACTIVITIES

(a) Skiing, snowshoeing, ice skating, sledding, inner tubing, tobogganing, and similar winter sports are prohibited on park roads and in parking areas open to motor vehicle traffic, except under the conditions below:

  • On park roads when closed to motorized vehicles and snow cover permits.
  • Persons travelling by foot or snow shoe on designated winter use trails groomed for cross country skiing shall stay within those portions of the groomed trail designated

36 CFR §2.21 – SMOKING

  1. The following portions of the park, buildings, structures and/or facilities are closed to smoking as noted:
  • Smoking in any park owned building, vehicle, or shared government residence is prohibited.
  • Smoking in the backcountry is prohibited during posted fire bans.

Determination: Smoking is prohibited to protect park resources, reduce the risk of fire, or prevent conflicts among visitor use areas.

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36 CFR §2.23 – RECREATION FEES

(b) Recreation fees and/or permits, in accordance with 36 CFR part 71, are established for the following areas and/or for the use of the following specialized sites, facilities, equipment or services, or for participation in the following group activity, recreation events or specialized recreation uses:

Entrance Fee Areas:

Loop Road

o 7 Day Entrance Pass – Vehicle $15.00

o 7 Day Entrance Pass – Motorcycle $10.00

o 7 Day Entrance Pass – Bicycle or Foot $7.00

o Craters of the Moon Annual Pass $30.00

o Interagency Annual Pass $80.00

o Interagency Senior Annual Pass $20.00

o Interagency Senior Lifetime Pass $80.00

Individuals age 15 and under enter free. Fees are also charged for commercial tour vehicles. Credit cards are accepted. There is no fee when the loop drive is closed in the winter-time. Accepted at the entrance station:

Interagency Annual Pass
This annual pass covers entrance and standard amenity fees for national parks and other federal fee areas; Valid for one year through the month of purchase. You can purchase the pass at the park.

Interagency Senior Pass
This is a lifetime pass for U.S. citizens or permanent residents age 62 or over. The pass provides access to, and use of, Federal recreation sites that charge an Entrance or Standard Amenity. The pass can only be obtained in person at the park. The Senior Pass provides a 50 percent discount on camping.

Interagency Access Pass:
This is a lifetime pass for U.S. citizens or permanent residents with permanent disabilities. Documentation is required to obtain the pass. The pass can only be obtained in person at the park. The Access Pass provides a 50 percent discount on camping.

Interagency 4th Grader Pass: Free
This pass is available to U.S. 4th Graders (including home-schooled and free-choice learners 10 years of age). Valid for the duration of the 4th grade school year through the following summer (September to August). Visit www.everykidinapark.gov. This pass provides free access to national parks, national forests, national wildlife refuges, and more!

Interagency Volunteer Pass: Free
This is an annual pass for volunteers with 250 cumulative service hours with federal agencies that participate in the Interagency Pass Program. Contact the park's VIP coordinator at 208-527-1331 to learn about volunteer opportunities at Craters of the Moon National Monument and Preserve.

Interagency Annual Pass for US Military: Free
This is an annual pass covering entrance and standard amenity fees for all national parks and other federal fee areas. Free to US military personnel and their dependents with proper identification (current CAC Card or qualified DD Form 1173 required). Obtain with military ID card at the Monument fee station or at the BLM field office in Shoshone.


Daily Site Use Fee Areas:

  • Camping Fee (per party, per night)

o Sites in Developed Area, non-electric $15.00

o Group Camp Site*, non-electric $30.00

In the off season, fees are reduced or not collected due to changes in janitorial services, potable water availability, and the winterization of buildings. Off season rates are listed below.

o Sites in Developed Area, non-electric $8.00

o Group Camp Site, non-electric CLOSED Oct 1st – Late May

(* Tent Camping Only)


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36 CFR §2.35 – ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES AND CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES

(a)(3)(i) The following areas and facilities within the park are closed to consumption of alcoholic beverages, and/or to the possession of a bottle, can or other receptacle containing an alcoholic beverage that is open, or has been opened, or whose seal has been broken or the contents of which have been partially removed:

  • Park building or vehicle (This does not pertain to picnic area or housing units in the park).

Determination: Park buildings are places of business and use and/or possession of alcoholic beverages is deemed inappropriate. These restrictions are necessary to protect visitors, park resources, to avoid visitor use conflicts and ensure safe and orderly operation of visitor use facilities

36 CFR §2.51 -- DEMONSTRATIONS

(b) Demonstrations of more than 25 people are allowed within park areas designated as available under paragraph (c)(2) when the superintendent has issued a permit for the activity.

(c)(2) The following locations are designated as available for demonstrations:

  • Visitor Center site
  • Caves Area site

Written applications must be submitted to the Superintendent within a reasonable time frame prior to the date desired for the event; processing usually requires 10 business days. The activity may not conflict with any scheduled NPS function or program.

Determination: These restrictions are necessary to protect visitors, park resources, to avoid visitor use conflicts and ensure safe and orderly operation of visitor use facilities or area. See map on page 22.

36 CFR §2.52 -- SALE OR DISTRIBUTION OF PRINTED MATTER

(b) The sale or distribution of printed matter by more than 25 persons is allowed within park areas designated as available under §2.51(c)(2) when the superintendent has issued a permit.

The following locations are designated as available for sale or distribution of printed matter:

  • Visitor Center site
  • Caves Area site

Determination: These restrictions are necessary to protect visitors, park resources, to avoid visitor use conflicts and ensure safe and orderly operation of visitor use facilities or area. See map on page 22.

36 CFR §2.62 – MEMORIALIZATION

(a) The installation of a monument, memorial, tablet, structure, or other commemorative installation in a park area without the authorization of the Director is prohibited.

(b) The scattering of human ashes from cremation is prohibited, except pursuant to the terms and conditions of a permit, or in the following areas and according to the following conditions:

  • The remains to be scattered must have been cremated and pulverized.
  • The scattering of remains by persons on the ground is to be performed at least 100 yards from any trail, road, developed facility, or body of water.
  • The scattering of remains from the air is to be performed at a minimum altitude of 2,000 feet above the ground.
  • No scattering of remains from the air is to be performed over developed areas, facilities, or bodies of water.


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36 CFR §4.11 – LOAD, WEIGHT AND SIZE LIMITS

(a)(1) Operating a vehicle that exceeds a load, weight or size limit designated by the Superintendent.

  • Commercial vehicles exceeding 8 Feet 6 inches in width, or longer than 75 feet are not permitted on the 7 Mile Loop Road past the Visitor Center unless authorized by the Superintendent.

Determination: This closure to over-sized vehicles is required due to the narrow and confined road widths found in many sections of the loop road.

36 CFR §4.21 – SPEED LIMITS

(a) Park area speed limits are as follows:

(1) 15 miles per hour: within all school zones, campgrounds, picnic areas, parking areas, utility areas, business or residential areas, other places of public assemblage and at emergency scenes.

(2) 25 miles per hour: upon sections of park road under repair or construction.

(3) 45 miles per hour: upon all other park roads.

(b) The Superintendent may designate a different speed limit upon any park road when a speed limit set forth in paragraph (a) of this section is determined to be unreasonable, unsafe or inconsistent with the purposes for which the park area was established. Speed limits shall be posted by using standard traffic control devices.

(c) Operating a vehicle at a speed in excess of the speed limit is prohibited.

The following speed limits are established for the routes/roads indicated:

  • 25 miles per hour on 7 Mile Loop Road.

Determination: The 7 Mile Loop Road has been identified as an area in which the 45 mile per hour speed limit would not be reasonable or safe, given the nature of the roadway, intersecting roads, heavy traffic flow, and/or pedestrian and bicycle use.

36 CFR §4.30 – BICYCLES

(a) The use of a bicycle is permitted on park roads and in parking areas that are otherwise open for motor vehicle use by the general public.

(b) Administrative roads are roads that are closed to motor vehicle use by the public, but open to motor vehicle use for administrative purposes. The Superintendent may authorize bicycle use on an administrative road.

  • Loop road prior and after winter grooming operations.

Determination: Permitting bicycles on the loop road per above will have no adverse impact on the resources.See map on page 17.

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Map of North end showing closed area
North End Closure area
 

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Determination based upon 36 CFR 1.5 (a)(1), 1.5(c) Closures and Public Use Limits and 1.6 (a) Permits

  • Off-trail travel is prohibited in the Spatter Cones/Big Craters area and in the North Crater Flow Trail area.

Determination:

Spatter Cones: The spatter cones are the icons of the monument, but by their very nature of formation are fragile and vulnerable to damage. Comparison of modern photographs with historic photographs shows a loss of elevation of approximately two feet as a result of anthropogenic disturbance. The spatter cones are steep sided and poorly consolidated, which not only makes them vulnerable to human damage, but also makes them hazardous for humans to climb on because individual globs of ejecta being used for hand or foot holds can break loose easily. In addition, the spatter cone vents have connections to the Great Rift in the subsurface. However, these passages can be blocked by snow, rock fall, or snow and rock fall plugs (like usually seen at snow cone), which can fail resulting in a precipitous fall of 75 ft. or more. In addition, some of the deeper vents are lined with delicate mineral encrustation and vulnerable to damage by climbers. Both because of the vulnerability of the monument’s icon geologic features to damage and also because of safety concerns the spatter cones area is closed to off-trail use.

Big Craters: The northeast rim of Big Craters represents a significant falling hazard. Parts of the rim are fairly well agglutinated, while other parts are loose cinder. It is not hard to picture someone starting to slide on the rim and not being able to stop before the precipitous drop into the crater. Most of the sides of the cone complex are at the normal angle of repose and some zones armored with spatter are above the normal angle of repose. This makes them particularly vulnerable to downslope movement, the passage of a single person can generate a trail and puts the hiker at physical risk. For protection of the cinder cone and human safety, the cone complex is closed to pedestrian traffic with the exception of the southwest rim trail.

North Crater Flow Trail: This trail is one of the most highly used trails in the monument, seeing tens of thousands of visitors per year. It showcases pahoehoe ropes, which are fragile and vulnerable to destruction. It also showcases a pressure ridge with outstanding squeeze-ups of lava that came up along the tension fracture in the top of the ridge and poured down the side. In the past there was a squeeze up in this area know as the “Devil’s Sewer”, but it was lost due to human vandalism. Glassy surface crusts on the pahoehoe are also vulnerable to damage from foot traffic. To protect these resources, the North Crater Flow Trail area is closed to off trail use.

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Map of Big Craters area
Big Craters/ Spatter Cones Closure
 
Map showing North Crater Flow closure
North Crater Flow closure
 

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Determination based upon 36 CFR 1.5 (a)(1), 1.5(c) Closures and Public Use Limits and 1.6 (a) Permits

  • Entry into closed sections of caves is prohibited.
  • Entry into Surprise Cave is prohibited unless authorized by permit issued by the Superintendent.

Determination: Park geologist Doug Owen observed ceiling instabilities in some of the high visitation caves which could potentially put visitors at risk. Mining Engineer Phil Cloues, (NPS Geologic Resources Division), examined the high visitation caves (May 2000) for hazards based upon of his specialized training and experience in rock properties and mechanics. Several ceiling stability safety issues were noted resulting in immediate closures. During the temporary closures, NPS Cave Specialist Joel Despain (Sequoia & Kings Canyon National Parks), Scott Earl and April Earl (Idaho Cave Survey) also examined the caves. The park used the safety recommendations of these subject matter specialists to implement closures described below:

Beauty Cave- the backroom of Beauty is closed at the start of the crawlway at the back of the front room and at the backdoor entrance with barriers and signs. The ceiling in the backroom is very unstable and a ceiling failure has the potential to propagate all the way to the surface forming a new skylight. Closure will remain in effect until such time as frost wedging or other natural processes cause ceiling failure.

Boy Scout Cave- a ceiling block in the south room, which is not well anchored in the front, but appears well constrained in the back has been cordoned off and signed to keep people from passing beneath it. Loose rock at the entranceway to the north room has been removed. All of Boy Scout, which was temporarily closed, has been reopened with the exception of the cordoned off area.

Buffalo Caves- the backdoor to Buffalo is closed with barriers and signs, the rest remains open. The ceiling of the backdoor area is very thin and in a process of failing as evidenced by the floor debris. Light can be seen through failed portions of the ceiling. Closure will remain in effect until nature takes its course.

Surprise Cave- the entrance to Surprise is extremely unstable and collapse could seal the cave shut, potentially trapping people not caught in the initial rock fall inside the cave. Cave is closed at entrance with barriers and signs.

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Wilderness trail map shows where stock are allowed
Stock is permitted on the Wilderness trail
 

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First Amendment Sites
First Amendment Sites
 

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Definitions

Abandonment means the voluntary relinquishment of property with no intent to retain possession.

Administrative activities means those activities conducted under the authority of the National Park Service for the purpose of safeguarding persons or property, implementing management plans and policies developed in accordance and consistent with the regulations in this chapter, or repairing or maintaining government facilities.

Administrative roads means roads that are closed to motor vehicle use by the public, but open to motor vehicle use for administrative purposes. The Superintendent may authorize bicycle use on an administrative road under certain guidelines.

Aircraft means a device that is used or intended to be used for human flight in the air, including powerless flight.

All-terrain vehicle (ATV) means any recreation vehicle with three (3) or more tires, under nine hundred (900) pounds and fifty (50) inches or less in width, having a wheelbase of sixty-one (61) inches or less, has handlebar steering and a seat designed to be straddled by the operator.

Archeological resource means material remains of past human life or activities that are of archeological interest and are at least 50 years of age. This term includes, but shall not be limited to, objects made or used by humans, such as pottery, basketry, bottles, weapons, weapon projectiles, tools, structures or portions of structures, pit houses, rock paintings, rock carvings, intaglios, or any portion or piece of the foregoing items, and the physical site, location or context in which they are found, or human skeletal materials or graves.

Authorized emergency vehicle means a vehicle in official use for emergency purposes by a Federal agency or an emergency vehicle as defined by State law.

Authorized person means an employee or agent of the National Park Service with delegated authority to enforce the provisions of this chapter.

Backcountry means primitive, undeveloped portions of parks including but not limited to wilderness and wilderness study areas.

Bicycle means every device propelled solely by human power upon which a person or persons may ride on land, having one, two, or more wheels, except a manual wheelchair.

Boundary means the limits of lands or waters administered by the National Park Service as specified by Congress, or denoted by presidential proclamation, or recorded in the records of a state or political subdivision in accordance with applicable law, or published pursuant to law, or otherwise published or posted by the National Park Service.

Camping means the erecting of a tent or shelter of natural or synthetic material, preparing a sleeping bag or other bedding material for use, parking of a motor vehicle, motor home or trailer, or mooring of a vessel for the apparent purpose of overnight occupancy.

Carry means to wear, bear, or have on or about the person.

Cultural resource means material remains of past human life or activities that are of significant cultural interest and are less than 50 years of age. This term includes, but shall not be limited to, objects made or used by humans, such as pottery, basketry, bottles, weapons, weapon projectiles, tools, structures or portions of structures, or any portion or piece of the foregoing items, and the physical site, location, or context in which they are found, or human skeletal materials or graves.

Developed area means roads, parking areas, picnic areas, campgrounds, or other structures, facilities or lands located within development and historic zones depicted on the park area land management and use map.

Director means the Director of the National Park Service.

Downed aircraft means an aircraft that cannot become airborne as a result of mechanical failure, fire, or accident.

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Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems (ENDS) means all forms of vaping, the process of inhaling vaporized nicotine, flavorings and other with a battery operated device. Electronic or e-cigarettes are a type of ENDS.

Firearm means a loaded or unloaded pistol, rifle, shotgun or other weapon which is designed to, or may be readily converted to, expel a projectile by the ignition of a propellant

Hunting means taking or attempting to take wildlife, except trapping.

Manual wheelchair means a device that is propelled by human power, designed for and used by a mobility-impaired person.

Motorbike means any self-propelled two (2) wheeled motorcycle or motor-driven cycle, excluding tractor, designed for or capable of traveling off developed roadways and highways and also referred to as trailbikes, enduro bikes, trials bikes, motocross bikes or dual purpose motorcycles.

Motorcycle means every motor vehicle having a seat for the use of the rider and designed to travel on not more than three wheels in contact with the ground, but excluding a tractor. Also meets the federal motor vehicle safety standards as originally designed, and includes a converted motorbike, but does not include a motor-driven cycle, a motorbike, a tractor or a moped defined in 49-114(11).

Motorized wheelchair means a self-propelled wheeled device, designed solely for and used by a mobility-impaired person for locomotion, that is both capable of and suitable for use in indoor pedestrian areas.

Motor vehicle means every vehicle that is self-propelled and every vehicle that is propelled by electric power, but not operated on rails or upon water, except a snowmobile and a motorized wheelchair.

National Park System (Park area) means any area of land and water now or hereafter administered by the Secretary of the Interior through the National Park Service for park, monument, historic, parkway, recreational, or other purposes.

Nondeveloped area means all lands and waters within park areas other than developed areas.

Off-road motorized vehicle (AKA: ORV, ATV, UTV) means any motorized vehicle designed for or capable of cross-country travel on or immediately over land, water, sand, snow, ice, or other natural terrain.

Operator means a person who operates, drives, controls, otherwise has charge of or is in actual physical control of a mechanical mode of transportation or any other mechanical equipment.

Pack animal means horses, burros, mules or other hoofed mammals when designated as pack animals by the superintendent.

Park area. See the definition for National Park System in this section.

Park road means the main-traveled surface of a roadway open to motor vehicles, owned, controlled or otherwise administered by the National Park Service.

Permit means a written authorization to engage in uses or activities that are otherwise prohibited, restricted, or regulated.

Person means an individual, firm, corporation, society, association, partnership, or private or public body.

Pet means a dog, cat or any animal that has been domesticated.

Possession means exercising direct physical control or dominion, with or without ownership, over property, or archeological, cultural or natural resources.

Public use limit means the number of persons; number and type of animals; amount, size and type of equipment, vessels, mechanical modes of conveyance, or food/beverage containers allowed to enter, be brought into, remain in, or be used within a designated geographic area or facility; or the length of time a designated geographic area or facility may be occupied.


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Refuse means trash, garbage, rubbish, waste papers, bottles or cans, debris, litter, oil, solvents, liquid waste, or other discarded materials.

Regional Director means the official in charge of a geographic area of the National Park Service.

Secretary means the Secretary of the Interior.

Sewage means human body waste or the waste from a toilet or other receptacle intended to receive or retain body waste.

Smoking means the carrying of lighted cigarettes, cigars or pipes, or the intentional and direct inhalation of smoke from these objects.

Snowmobile means a self-propelled vehicle intended for travel primarily on snow, having a curb weight of not more than 1000 pounds (450 kg), driven by a track or tracks in contact with the snow, and steered by ski or skis in contact with the snow.

Specialty off-highway vehicle means any vehicle manufactured, designed or constructed exclusively for off-highway operation that does not fit the definition of an all-terrain vehicle, utility type vehicle or motorbike as defined in Idaho Code §67-7101.

State means a State, territory, or possession of the United States.

State law means the applicable and non-conflicting laws, statutes, regulations, ordinances, infractions and codes of the State(s) and political subdivision(s) within whose exterior boundaries a park area or a portion thereof is located.

Superintendent means the official in charge of a park area or an authorized representative thereof.

Take or taking means to pursue, hunt, harass, harm, shoot, trap, net, capture, collect, kill, wound, or attempt to do any of the above.

Traffic means pedestrians, ridden or herded animals, vehicles, and other conveyances, either singly or together while using any road, trail, street or other thoroughfare for purpose of travel.

Traffic control device means a sign, signal, marking or other device placed or erected by, or with the concurrence of, the Superintendent for the purpose of regulating, warning, guiding or otherwise controlling traffic or regulating the parking of vehicles.

Trap means a snare, trap, mesh, wire or other implement, object or mechanical device designed to entrap or kill animals other than fish.

Trapping means taking or attempting to take wildlife with a trap.

Unloaded, as applied to weapons and firearms, means that: (1) There is no unexpended shell, cartridge, or projectile in any chamber or cylinder of a firearm or in a clip or magazine inserted in or attached to a firearm;

(2) A muzzle-loading weapon does not contain gun powder in the pan, or the percussion cap is not in place; and

(3) Bows, crossbows, spear guns or any implement capable of discharging a missile or similar device by means of a loading or discharging mechanism, when that loading or discharging mechanism is not charged or drawn.

Unmanned Aircraft (AKA: UAS, UAV, “drone”) means a device that is used or intended to be used for flight in the air without the possibility of direct human intervention from within or on the device, and the associated operational elements and components that are required for the pilot or system operator in command to operate or control the device (such as cameras, sensors, communication links). This term includes all types of devices that meet this definition (e.g., model airplanes, quad-copters, drones) that are used for any purpose, including recreation or commerce.


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Utility type vehicle (UTV) means any recreational motor vehicle other than an ATV, motorbike or snowmobile as defined in this section designed for and capable of travel over designated roads, traveling on four (4) or more tires, maximum width less than seventy-four (74) inches, maximum weight less than two thousand (2,000) pounds, and having a wheelbase of one hundred ten (110) inches or less. A utility type vehicle must have a minimum width of fifty (50) inches, a minimum weight of at least nine hundred (900) pounds or a wheelbase of over sixty-one (61) inches. Utility type vehicle does not include golf carts, vehicles specially designed to carry a disabled person, implements of husbandry as defined in Idaho Code § 49-110(2), or vehicles otherwise registered under title 49, Idaho Code.

Vehicle means every device in, upon, or by which a person or property is or may be transported or drawn on land, except snowmobiles and devices moved by human power or used exclusively upon stationary rails or track.

Weapon means a firearm, compressed gas or spring-powered pistol or rifle, bow and arrow, crossbow, blowgun, speargun, hand-thrown spear, slingshot, irritant gas device, explosive device, or any other implement designed to discharge missiles, and includes a weapon the possession of which is prohibited under the laws of the State in which the park area or portion thereof is located.

Wilderness means lands designated by law as part of the National Wilderness Preservation System.

Wildlife means any member of the animal kingdom and includes a part, product, egg or offspring thereof, or the dead body or part thereof, except fish.

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Last updated: December 13, 2017

Contact the Park

Mailing Address:

Craters of the Moon National Monument and Preserve
P.O. Box 29

Arco, ID 83213

Phone:

(208) 527-1300

Contact Us