Fish

Bluehead Sucker
Bluehead Sucker

NPS

 

Much of the Capitol Reef region is considered “high desert,” with an average of 8 inches (20.3 cm) of precipitation a year. Despite this classification, there are a few perennial (year-round) water sources, like the Fremont River and Sulphur Creek, that can support fish populations. The park is home to several species, some native and some non-native or introduced. A complete Wildlife Checklist can be downloaded.

 

Native Fish

Bluehead Sucker

Bluehead suckers (Pantosteus delphinus) are native to the Colorado River system and are found in the Fremont River, Pleasant Creek, and Sulphur Creek. They are usually found in riffles of the streams. Bluehead suckers feed on algae, slime, and aquatic insect larvae. This species is included on the Utah Sensitive Species List. These benthic (bottom-dwelling) species have a mouth modified to scrape algae (their primary food source) from the surface of rocks.

Flannelmouth Sucker

Flannelmouth suckers (Catostomus latipinnis) are native to the Colorado River system, including the Fremont River. They are herbivorous and ascend streams in the spring to spawn. In recent times, Utah flannelmouth sucker populations have been reduced in both numbers and distribution, primarily due to flow alteration, habitat loss/alteration. The species is included on the Utah Sensitive Species List. These benthic (bottom-dwelling) fish primarily eat algae, although invertebrates and many types of plant matter are also consumed.

Mountain Sucker

Mountain suckers (Catostomus platyrhychus) are native to Utah's Bonneville Basin, as well as the Colorado River system. They are probably present, but unconfirmed, in the park. These benthic (bottom-dwelling) fish eat algae, higher plants, and occasionally invertebrates. Mountain suckers are small and usually 6-8 in (15-20 cm) in length.

Speckled Dace

Speckled dace (Rhinichthys osculus) are native to the Fremont River and other perennial streams in the park, where they are common and widespread. They prefer rubble-strewn riffle areas and feed on algae and other plant materials as well as small crustaceans, insect larvae, and small snails. These benthic feeders (they feed on the bottom), eat primarily insect larvae and other invertebrates, although algae and fish eggs are also consumed.

Mottled Sculpin

Mottled sculpin (Cottus bairdi) are a native species found in the Fremont River. They are carnivorous, bottom feeders that consume insect larvae, crustaceans, small fish and snails. These fish spawn from late winter through the spring.

 

Non-Native Fish

Utah Sucker

Utah suckers (Catostomus ardens) are native to the Bonneville Basin of Utah, where they were introduced into the Colorado River system and occur in the Fremont River. They are relatively abundant in Utah, especially in Bear Lake. These benthic (bottom dwelling) fish are capable of adapting to many different types of environmental conditions in both lakes and streams. Utah suckers consume plant and animal matter, with algae being a common food item.

Utah Chub

Utah chub (Gila atraria) are native to the Bonneville Basin of Utah, where they were introduced into the Colorado River system and occur in the Fremont River. They are generalized feeders, consuming higher plants, algae, terrestrial and aquatic insects, snails, crustaceans, and small fish. These fish spawn during July.

Redside Shiner

Redside shiners (Richardsonius balteatus) are native to Bonneville and Columbia River basins, where they were introduced into the Colorado River system and are common in the Fremont River. They feed on small aquatic insect larvae, crustaceans, and some plant debris. These fish spawn in late June.

Southern Leatherside Chub

Southern leatherside chub (Lepidomeda aliciae) are native to the Bonneville Basin of Utah, where they were introduced into the Colorado River system and occur in the Fremont River, Pleasant Creek, and Sulphur Creek.

Bluegill

Bluegills (Lepomis machrochirus) are not native to Utah and are occasionally found in Halls Creek where they migrate from Lake Powell. They feed on mollusks, crustaceans, insect larvae, and occasionally on small fish and aquatic plants. These fish spawn in the spring and summer, with eggs hatching in about 2 days.

Rainbow Trout

Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus gairdnerii) are native to western North America, but not to Utah. They are fairly uncommon but have been found in the Fremont River and upper reaches of Pleasant Creek. Rainbow trout eat primarily invertebrates, including insects, worms, zooplankton, and insect larvae.

Brown Trout

Brown trout (Salmo trutta) are native to Europe and western Asia and are found in the park in the Fremont River. They are piscivorous (fish-eating) but also consume amphibians, rodents, and invertebrates, including insects, snails, and crayfish.

Black Bullhead

Black bullhead (Ameiurus melas) are not native to Utah and are occasionally found in Halls Creek near the southern park boundary where they migrate from Lake Powell. Black bullheads are adaptable to a wide range of aquatic conditions but show preference for more quiet and muddier parts of a stream. They consume fishes, many types of invertebrates, plant matter, and detritus. These fish spawn from late spring to early summer.

Last updated: April 5, 2020

Contact the Park

Mailing Address:

HC 70, Box 15
Torrey, UT 84775

Phone:

435-425-3791
Recorded park information available 24 hours a day. Phones are answered when staff is available. If no one answers, please leave a message, your call will be returned. Questions may also be sent to care_information@nps.gov.

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