New York and the 19th Amendment

State of New York depicted in purple, white, and gold (colors of the National Woman’s Party suffrage flag) – indicating New York was one of the original 36 states to ratify the 19th Amendment. Courtesy Megan Springate.
State of New York depicted in purple, white, and gold (colors of the National Woman’s Party suffrage flag) – indicating New York was one of the original 36 states to ratify the 19th Amendment.

CC0

Women fought for the right to vote since the mid-1800s. They marched, protested, lobbied, and even went to jail. By the 1870s, women pressured Congress to vote on an amendment that would give them suffrage rights. This amendment became known as the 19th Amendment.

After decades of arguments for and against women's suffrage, Congress finally voted in favor of the 19th Amendment in 1919. This is called ratification. After Congress ratified the 19th Amendment, at least 36 states needed to vote in favor of it for it to become law.

Flag of New York State.
State flag of New York. CC0
On June 16, 1919, New York voted in favor of the Nineteenth Amendment. By August of 1920, 36 states (including New York) approved the proposal and it became law. The proposal, now the 19th Amendment, made women’s suffrage legal all across the country.
Newspaper article published by the New York Times, January 19, 1910.  Courtesy of the New York State Women's Suffrage Exhibition Collection. https://cdm16694.contentdm.oclc.org/digital/collection/p16694coll52/id/672
Newspaper article published by the New York Times, January 19, 1910. Suffrage organizations were rarely integrated, however both black and white suffragists sometimes worked together to advance the cause.

Courtesy of the New York State Women's Suffrage Exhibition Collection.
https://cdm16694.contentdm.oclc.org/digital/collection/p16694coll52/id/672

Last updated: August 23, 2018