TCMP Infographics

During the open comment period for Arches' Traffic Congestion Management Plan (TCMP), we hosted a public open house on November 16, 2017, and presented these graphics for visitors. Explore our current situation and our proposed solutions to the problem.

Questions

To learn more, and for frequently asked questions, visit our Traffic Congestion Management Plan page.

 
a bar graph showing a 90 percent increase in visitation at Arches National Park, 84 percent at all Utah national parks, 37 percent at Intermountain Region National Parks, and 21 percent at all national parks

Graphic: NPS/Chris Wonderly

How did we get here?

Alternative text: This horizontal bar graph shows a 90 percent growth in visitation at Arches National Park in the last 10 years. In the same period, visitation increased 84 percent at Utah national parks, 37 percent at Intermountain Region national parks, and 21 percent at all US national parks.

 
a line chart showing visitation throughout the year. The chart spikes during holiday weekends and March through October
This line chart shows daily vehicle entrance at Arches National Park in 2016. The line peaks at holiday weekends. The highest visitation is Memorial Day, Independence Day, and Labor Day. Lowest points are in January and early February, and early December.

Graphic: NPS/Chris Wonderly

What's happening now?

Daily vehicle entrances at Arches National Park 2016

Alternative Text: This line chart shows visitation throughout the year of 2016. These holidays are labeled: Presidents Day, Spring Breaks, Easter, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Utah Education Association (UEA) Weekend, Veterans Day, and Thanksgiving Day.

There are notable spikes on holiday weekends, and visitation remains high between March and October. A red horizontal line is just above the 2,000 line with the label: "Proposed 2,006-vehicle limit." In 2016, the park was busiest on Memorial Day, Independence Day, and Labor Day.

 
A chart shows depictions of cars stacked in columns
This chart shows the number of cars in the park by hour during an average June day in 2016. The peak is at 12 noon, when more than 800 cars are in the park. Occupancy remains high through the afternoon. People experience long lines, traffic congestion, crowded parking, and long walks to trailheads.

Graphic: NPS/Chris Wonderly

What's happening now?

Most people enter the park in mid-morning. The park remains crowded through the afternoon.

People experience:

  • long lines
  • traffic congestion
  • long walks to trailheads
  • crowded parking
 
a graphic with clocks and calendars shows the season for reservations, 7 am to 6 pm March through October.
This graphic shows the period when reservations would be required under the proposed plan. Between March 1 and October 31, you would need a vehicle entry reservation between 7 am and 6 pm. You would not need a reservation between 6 pm and 7 am, or at any time November through February.

Graphic: NPS/Chris Wonderly

What would change?

  • We propose to implement a reservation system during the busy season, March through October. During these months, you would need a vehicle entry reservations between 7 am and 6 pm daily. Between 6 pm and 7 am, you would not need a reservation
  • Between November and Feburary, you would not need a reservation at any time.
 
graphics of stacked cars show average monthly visitation and the small percentage of vehicles that would have to make other plans if our proposed 2,006 vehicle limit went into effect.
This chart shows average monthly visitation across the year. The peak season, and our proposed reservation season, would be March through October. Only 3.2 percent of current visitors would have to make other plans if they came when we reached our limit of 2,006 vehicles between 7 am and 6 pm.

Graphic: NPS/Chris Wonderly

How would this affect visitors?

  • We propose a vehicle limit of 2,006 vehicles between 7 am and 6 pm, March through October. Outside those times, there would be no limit.
  • In that reservation period, only 3.2 percent of current visitors would have to make other plans, like coming back at another time.
 
a chart lists effects to visitors and local businesses and the community if the park implements the plan
This image shows a list of potential effects to visitors and businesses and the community. Some effects include a loss of spontaneity, reduced crowding and wait times, spreading tourism more evenly across the year, and increasing demand for commercial tours and guide services.

Graphic: NPS/Chris Wonderly

What Might Change?

How might this plan affect visitors, businesses, and the local community?

Potential Impacts on Visitors

  • loss of spontaneity
  • may not be able to enter at their preferred time
  • ensured entrance at reserved time
  • reduced crowding and wait times

Potential Impacts on Businesses and Community

  • could spread tourism more evenly across the year
  • more consistent economic opportunities and employment
  • could restrain some growth opportunities for commercial services
  • could increase demand for commercial tours and guide services
 
several graphics of alternative ideas to manage traffic and congestion
This graphic shows some other ideas we considered, including building more parking, operating a shuttle system, building a second entrance, having site-specific reservations, and having a "one-in, one-out" system if the park reached capacity.

Graphic: NPS/Chris Wonderly

What other ideas were considered?

We considered other ideas such as:

  • Building more parking lots
  • Operating a shuttle system
  • Building a second entrance
  • Setting reservations for specific sites
  • Using a "one-in, one-out" system
  • Using time-limited parking
 

Last updated: October 9, 2018

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Mailing Address:

PO Box 907
Moab, UT 84532

Phone:

(435) 719-2299

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