• Image of coast redwood forest along Cal-Barrel Road

    Redwood

    National and State Parks California

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  • Warning: Elk Calving Season, Elk Can Be Aggressive

    Female (cow) elk are defensive of their newly born calves. As people approach, a cow may charge and/or rear up and lash out with her front legs. For your safety, STAY 500 FEET AWAY from elk, at all times. More »

  • Davison Road Maintenance begins 7/7/2014. Expect delays.

    Beginning July 7, road crews will be grading sections of Davison Road between the hours of 8 am and 4:30 pm. Visitors to Gold Bluffs Beach and Fern Canyon should expect 30 minute delays.

  • Jedediah Smith Campground sites available by reservation, ONLY.

    Due to campground maintenance needs, first-come, first-served sites are currently unavailable at Jedediah Smith Campground. Until further notice, sites are a available by reservation, ONLY. More »

Hiking Trails - North

This web page features Redwood National and State Parks' northern trails, starting along Hwy 199 near Hiouchi and ending at the Klamath River. The Coastal Trail sections are listed separately. Be sure to pick up a map. Explore, understand, protect one of the oldest forests on Earth!
 

Leiffer-Ellsworth Loop Trail

  • Location: Jedediah Smith Redwoods State Park
  • Trailhead: Marked trailhead is off Walker Road, 0.4 miles from Hwy 199 junction.
  • Mileage: 2.6-mile loop
  • Difficulty Level: Non-level, some grades, not steep
  • Description: Take a step back in time on a trail that travels along a section of the 19th-century Crescent City Plank Road before descending into a canyon filled with hazel and vine maple. During the spring, clintonia, western burning bush, thimbleberry, red huckleberry, and western trillium color the trail, while California bay and tanoak wave overhead. Old-growth redwoods tower above, illustrating the many levels found in a climax forest.
 

Simpson-Reed Trail

  • Location: Jedediah Smith Redwoods State Park
  • Trailhead: Exit Walker Road off U.S. 199 and proceed north ~.1 mile to marked trailhead on right (east) side of road.
  • Mileage: 1-mile loop
  • Difficulty Level: Easy, level (Rated: barrier free)
  • Description: Enter an ancient forest where 1,000-year-old redwoods form a towering canopy over a mixture of hardwood trees, shrubs, and ferns. Every old-growth forest has its own distinctive characteristics. This grove includes a lush stream corridor where fallen trees lie randomly in the water, forming staircases and pools that support fish and insects. Other fallen giants nurse new life on the forest floor as hemlock trees, huckleberries, and ferns sprout among their decaying trunks and branches. The damp shade of the forest creates ideal conditions for red-legged frogs, rough-skinned newts, and other amphibians that depend on the tree to provide moisture through the dry summer, assuring a home for a class of animals that are in decline.
 

Hatton Trail

  • Location: Jedediah Smith Redwoods State Park
  • Trailhead: Marked trailhead is on south side of Hwy 199, across from Simpson-Reed trailhead.
  • Mileage: 0.3
  • Difficulty Level: Non-level, some grades, not steep.
  • Description: This short connector trail provides access to the Hatton-Hiouchi Trail. An easy loop leads through the moist forest undergrowth before branching off onto the Hiouchi Trail.
 

Hatton-Hiouchi Trail

  • Location: Jedediah Smith Redwoods State Park
  • Trailhead: Accessed via forks on Hiouchi Trail or Hatton Trail
  • Mileage: 1.2
  • Difficulty Level: Non-level, some grades, not steep
  • Description: After an initial climb up the ridge, this moderate hike winds through undisturbed redwood forest before dropping down to river level to join up with the Hiouchi Trail. Highway sounds are muffled by the dense forest cover, while occasional breaks in the canopy allow trailside flowers to flourish.
 

Hiouchi Trail

  • Location: Jedediah Smith Redwoods State Park
  • Trailhead: Marked trailhead is just before west end of Hiouchi Bridge on Hwy 199. Summer seasonal footbridge allows access from Jedediah Smith Campground. Trail can also be accessed via Hatton Trail off Hwy 199.
  • Mileage: 2
  • Difficulty Level: Moderate, non-level grades, not steep.
  • Description: A delightful hike along the pristine turquoise Smith River, this trail provides views of both riparian (near-stream) forest and old-growth redwoods. California bay, tanoak, Douglas-fir, and Pacific madrone abound, while salal, huckleberry, and thimbleberry draw in wildlife during the late summer and fall months. A moderate grade and spectacular views make this trail a favorite among visitors and rangers alike.

River Trail

  • Location: Jedediah Smith Redwoods State Park
  • Trailhead: Marked trailhead is off Howland Hill Road, across from Little Bald Hills Trail access road.
  • Mileage: 1
  • Difficulty Level: Moderate, some non-level grades
  • Description: Walk along the last major undammed river system in California. During the summer, serpentine waters flow beside an old-growth redwood forest and provide excellent habitat for chinook salmon and steelhead trout.
 
Little Bald Hills Trail

Five miles into your hike, you will be in a Jeffrey and knobcone pine forest. Look for hawks and wildflowers.

Little Bald Hills Trail (bikes and horses allowed)

  • Location: Jedediah Smith Redwoods State Park
  • Trailhead: Marked trailhead is on the east end of Howland Hill Road.
  • Mileage: 3.3 to primitive campsite and 4.8 to park boundary. From there, an additional 5 miles on the Paradise Flat Trail (Smith River National Recreation Area) to South Fork Road.
  • Difficulty Level: Strenuous, steep grades and switchbacks, 1,800 foot rise in elevation.
  • Description: As you traverse this old pack trail, you will climb through changing habitats that exist nowhere else in the parks, each featuring a different mix of trees, plants, and flowers. The soil nourishing each blend of vegetation is derived from four distinctive rock formations. At the beginning of the trail, a fern-filled redwood forest thrives in sedimentary soil from an ancient sea floor. Higher up, as the underlying rock changes to mottled green and black serpentine, Port-Orford-cedar, Douglas-fir, and coffeeberry flourish. Farther along, red clay sustains a knobcone pine forest mixed with huckleberry and azalea. Atop the ridge, open prairies and shrub fields, dotted with beargrass and hairy manzanita, spread across the white acidic soils. Backcountry camp exists at 3.3 miles in.
 
Stout Memorial Grove

The ancient trees of Stout Grove.

Stout Memorial Grove

  • Location: Jedediah Smith Redwoods State Park
  • Trailhead: Paved access road is on east end of Howland Hill Road. Summer seasonal bridge allows access from Jedediah Smith Campground.
  • Mileage: 0.5-mile loop
  • Difficulty Level: After the initial descent from the parking lot, the trail is easy and flat.
  • Description: Stout Grove, a majestic example of an ancient coast redwood forest, is often considered to be the heart of Jedediah Smith Redwoods State Park. In 1929, Mrs. Clara Stout donated this 44-acre grove to the Save-the-Redwoods League to save it from being logged and to memorialize her husband, lumber baron Frank D. Stout. A walk along this loop trail reveals colossal redwoods thriving in rich soil deposited during periodic flooding of the Smith River. Here, waist-high sword ferns carpet the forest floor and normally flared tree bases stop short, covered in river soils. Flood waters inhibit the growth of understory trees and plants seen in other groves, leaving the 300-foot redwoods on display. A short spur trail leads you to the serpentine waters of the Smith River.
 

Mill Creek Trail

  • Location: Jedediah Smith Redwoods State Park
  • Trailhead: East trailhead can be accessed via summer seasonal footbridge from Jedediah Smith Campground. West trailhead is midway up Howland Hill Road.
  • Mileage: 2.6
  • Difficulty Level: Moderate, non-level grades. Not steep.
  • Description: This half-day hike wanders through an old-growth redwood forest. Mill Creek is a crystal stream bordered by thick forest that provides excellent habitat for coho and Chinook salmon, as well as steelhead and cutthroat trout. From October through December, vine and big-leaf maples display crimson and golden colors, and berries are available for the taking (one gallon per person per day). This trail allows easy access for fishing, photography, and identification of many plants endemic to the redwood forest community.
 

Boy Scout Tree Trail

  • Location: Jedediah Smith Redwoods State Park
  • Trailhead: Marked trailhead and parking area is on north side of Howland Hill Road.
  • Mileage: 2.8
  • Difficulty Level: Moderate, some steep grades and switchbacks.
  • Description: Allow at least half a day to enjoy this outstanding trail, which leads you deep into the old-growth forest before concluding at Fern Falls. Slight changes in elevation give a different perspective on the redwoods and allow a peek into the dense canopy. At 2½ miles from the trailhead, an unmarked but prevalent spur trail leads up to the Boy Scout Tree (a double redwood), so named because of its discovery by a local troop leader.

Nickerson Ranch Trail

  • Location: Jedediah Smith Redwoods State Park
  • Trailhead: Marked trailhead is off west end of Howland Hill Road.
  • Mileage: 1
  • Difficulty Level: Moderate, some non-level grades
  • Description: This moderate trail provides stellar examples of primeval redwood forest, and illustrates the change in vegetation as you approach Mill Creek. The relationship between forest and stream is evident, and in several places you can observe where large fallen redwoods provide habitat for young fish in the creek.
 

Mill Creek Horse Trail

  • Location: Redwood National Park
  • Trailhead: Marked trailhead is on Bertsch Avenue off west end of Howland Hill Road. Partial closure in winter to protect salmon spawning habitat. See link below.
  • Mileage: 7.75
  • Difficulty Level: Strenuous, numerous steep grades and switchbacks
  • Description: As you ride up the ridge to overlook scenic views of Crescent City and Crescent Beach, evidence of past logging practices gives a glimpse into area history. This is a relatively steep trail that passes through areas of red alder and second-growth redwood forest. Due to the numerous stream crossings along the trail, part of it is closed during the winter to protect coho and Chinook salmon spawning grounds in Mill Creek (an alternate route is available). Mill Creek closure with map.
 

Rellim Ridge Trail

  • Location: Redwood National Park and Jedediah Smith Redwoods State Park
  • Trailhead: South trailhead is just beyond gate on Hamilton Road. North trailhead is at locked gate approximately 0.2 miles beyond end of pavement on west end of Howland Hill Road. Rellim Ridge merges with Mill Creek Horse Trail.
  • Mileage: 4.3
  • Difficulty Level: Moderate, non-level grades, not steep
  • Description: A strenuous climb up the thickly forested ridge reveals private vista points overlooking Crescent City harbor and beyond, while alder, spruce, and young Douglas-fir mix with maple and tanoak to provide breathtaking scenery along the trail. This trail is named for the Miller-Rellim timber company, which was a mainstay of the local economy in the early to mid-1800s.
 

Enderts Beach - take Coastal Trail, Last Chance section

  • Location: Redwood National Park
  • Trailhead: Marked trailhead is at the end of Enderts Beach Road off Hwy 101.
  • Mileage:0.6
  • Difficulty Level: Moderate, some steep grades.
  • Description: Spectacular tidepools reward you at the end of this short hike. (Check at the trailhead bulletin board or at the visitor center for low tide times). Interpretive signs along the trail provide an excellent opportunity to learn more about (1) coastal forest plants and their unique adaptations to their harsh environment and (2) tidepool creatures. Part of the trail encompasses the old coast highway that existed before the construction of present-day Highway 101. Surfs Up brochure.
 

**Mill Creek Campground is open seasonally. A gate on Mill Creek Campground Rd. restricts vehicle access to the following trailheads during the off-season. During closure, you can park along Hwy 101 to utilize these trails.

**Mill Creek Campground Trail

  • Location: Del Norte Coast Redwoods State Park
  • Trailhead: Adjacent to entrance road at Mill Creek Campground
  • Mileage: 0.7
  • Difficulty Level: Easy, flat
  • Description: An easy walk and excellent introduction to the camping area, this trail is appropriate for children and allows easy access to Mill Creek for stream exploration and birdwatching.
 

**Hobbs-Wall Trail

  • Location: Del Norte Coast Redwoods State Park.
  • Trailhead: Marked trailhead is off Mill Creek Campground access road. Trail can also be accessed via Nature Loop trail or Saddler Skyline trail.
  • Mileage: 3.75
  • Difficulty Level: Moderate, non-level grades, not steep.
  • Description: A truly historic trail, this route is named for the primary company of the Del Norte timber industry during the late 1860s. Today, travel through an ancient redwood forest with gigantic coast redwoods. As you hike down to the entrance station, the forest turns into second-growth redwoods. Check out the difference in size and make up of plants.
 

**Nature Loop Trail

  • Location: Del Norte Coast Redwoods State Park
  • Trailhead: Marked trailhead is across from Mill Creek Campground entrance station.
  • Mileage: 1-mile loop
  • Difficulty Level: Non-level, some steep grades
  • Description: This easy 20-minute stroll allows visitors to learn about the redwood forest through interpretive signs along the path. In addition to coast redwoods, muscular madrone, birch-like alder, erect tanoak, and wispy vine maple attract your attention.
 

**Saddler Skyline Trail

  • Location: Del Norte Coast Redwoods State Park
  • Trailhead: Marked trailhead is between campsites 7 and 8 in the Mill Creek Campground. Trail can also be accessed via Nature Loop Trail or Hobbs-Wall Trail.
  • Mileage: 1.5
  • Difficulty Level: Moderate, some steep grades and switchbacks
  • Description: Like the other trails surrounding the Mill Creek seasonal campground, this route is filled with thimbleberry, huckleberry, redwood sorrel, wild ginger, false Solomon’s seal, and California blackberry; all of which draw in numerous birds and small wildlife such as gray squirrels and red foxes.
 

**Trestle Loop Trail

  • Location: Del Norte Coast Redwoods State Park
  • Trailhead: Marked trailhead is across from campfire center in Mill Creek Campground.
  • Mileage: 1-mile loop
  • Difficulty Level: Non-level, some steep grades
  • Description: Follow the trestles of a long-ago railroad route along Mill Creek through second-growth redwood, spruce, maple, and alder forest. Harvest berries (limit one gallon per person per day) and watch a multitude of birds along the way. The bird that sounds like a short train whistle is the varied thrush.
 

**Alder Basin Trail

  • Location: Del Norte Coast Redwoods State Park
  • Trailhead: Accessed via Mill Creek Campground Trail, across from Mill Creek Campground entrance off Hwy 101
  • Mileage: 1
  • Difficulty Level: Easy, flat
  • Description: This creekside stroll offers children and adults numerous opportunities to spot small wildlife, aquatic insects, salamanders, and juvenile fish in Mill Creek. Walk beside red alder, vine maple, and willow, classic streamside (riparian) vegetation bending to the breeze.

 

Damnation Creek Trail

  • Location:Del Norte Coast Redwoods State Park
  • Trailhead:Milepost 16.0 on Hwy 101
  • Mileage: 2.2
  • Difficulty Level:Strenuous, numerous steep grades and switchbacks. Trail drops 1,000 feet (16 percent grade)
  • Description: Experience the ancient redwood forest and the jagged Pacific coastline. This steep trail descends 1,000 feet (330 m) through the forest where canopy branches look like treetop arms holding thousand of plants. In the past, Tolowa Indians used the tidepools at the ocean for food gathering. Arrive at low tide and carefully make your way to the beach from the bluff. Remember our motto for tidepool creatures, observe but do not disturb.
 

Yurok Loop Trail

  • Location: Redwood National Park
  • Trailhead: Marked trailhead is on north side of Lagoon Creek picnic area parking lot.
  • Mileage: 1-mile loop
  • Difficulty Level: Non-level, some grades, not steep.
  • Description: Explore the coastal environment along this easy trail and take in views of False Klamath Cove and Lagoon Creek. An excellent route for children, the Yurok Loop encompasses stellar examples of coastal scrub forest plants, which include Sitka spruce, Douglas-fir, cow parsnip, wild cucumber, coltsfoot, yarrow, and many varieties of berries. Take binoculars to view seabirds (cormorants, pigeon guillemots, brown pelicans, and common murres) on the seastacks (big rocks left behind by erosion).

Did You Know?

Did You Know?

The Bald Hills Road serves as a scenic byway to a high prairie landscape dotted with magnificent 300-year-old Oregon white oak trees. This region of the parks offers fields of colorful springtime wildflowers and trail access to several historic ranches. A Roosevelt elk herd could surprise you!