• Olympic: Three Parks in One

    Olympic

    National Park Washington

Temperate Rain Forest

fallen log covered with growing plants
Fallen trees, known as "nurse logs", provide extra room to grow in the temperate rain forest.
 
Drenched in over 12 feet of rain a year, Olympic's west side valleys flourish with North America's best remaining examples of temperate rain forest. Giant western hemlocks, Douglas-firs and Sitka spruce trees dominate the landscape while ferns and moss cloak the trees and forest floor. In these valleys, even the air seems green.
 

Hoh Rain Forest
About 90 miles west of Port Angeles, the Hoh Rain Forest has a visitor center, campground and picnic area. There are self-guided nature trails and in summer, ranger-led programs.

Visiting the Hoh Rain Forest

 

Lake Quinault Area -- Quinault Rain Forest
Lake Quinault's north shore lies within the park, while the south shore is managed by Olympic National Forest. Ranger stations, campgrounds, lodging, and trails are available on both sides of the lake.

Visiting Quinault

Looking for more of a wilderness experience? Make sure to check out the Wilderness Trip Planner for details about hiking, camping, and safety during your wilderness getaway.

Did You Know?

View of the Elwha Valley

Did you know that in 1988, Congress designated 95% of Olympic National Park as Wilderness. The Olympic Wilderness is a part of the National Wilderness Preservation System. More...