• Camarasus skull in the cliff face, rafters on the Green River, McKee Springs petroglyphs

    Dinosaur

    National Monument CO,UT

Permits

Many activities, including gatherings, operating a business within the monument, scientific research, commercial filming and river boating in Dinosaur National Monument require a permit. The purpose of these permits is to ensure the protection of the park's natural and cultural resources, as well as to minimize conflicts between park visitors and your guests.

Review the information below to determine which type of permit you need. Contact the monument at (435) 781-7700 if you have any questions. Fees may be required, where applicable.

 

Special Uses Permit
Gatherings and commercial activities in National Parks often require a special use permit. The purpose of these permits is to ensure the protection of the park's natural and cultural resources, as well as to minimize conflicts between park visitors and your guests.

Commercial Filming & Photography Permit
Commercial filming and photography in Dinosaur National Monument requires a permit. Commercial filming means filming that involves the digital or film recording of a visual image or sound recording by a person, business, or other entity for a market audience.

Research & Collecting Permit
Collection or removal of any natural or historic items from Dinosaur National Monument is prohibited without a collection permit. Research/collection permits are issued to accredited institutions, such as museums and universities, who are conducting scientific research on park lands or resources.

Boating & Rafting Permit
Permits are required to launch any type of vessel on the rivers within Dinosaur National Monument.

Backcountry Camping Permit
Free backcountry permits are required for overnight stays outside developed campgrounds and may be obtained at a monument visitor center.

Did You Know?

Split Mountain

Split Mountain, the name John Wesley Powell gave to one of the Dinosaur’s most recognizable features, is aptly named: over millions of years, the Green River has carved a canyon into the center of the mountain, splitting it in two.