Bear Facts

September 3-16, 2017

updated as often as possible


Interested in stories from the Bear Team? Follow the Yosemite Bear Team Blog to read about the challenges and successes of Yosemite's bear management.

Fascinating Bear Fact

The home range of the black bear can depend on food source availability, season, and gender. Males generally range between 8-60 square miles, while females can range between 1-15 square miles.

Bear Incidents

Location

Biweekly total

This year

Parking lots and roadsides

0

0

Campgrounds

1

5

Other areas

0

3

Residential

0

2

Wilderness

1

23

Total

2

33

Number of incidents last year: 38

So far this year, incidents are up by 3% compared to the same time last year (a record low year), and down 98% since 1998.

Activity Update

Bear activity has remained relatively slow in Yosemite this month, likely because they are taking advantage of the abundance of natural foods. Bear activity has, however, picked up at the Crane Flat Campground. In the past week there have been numerous bear sightings and one bear incident that resulted in a damaged tent while people were away from their campsite. Please remember that even when you don’t see a bear, they could be very nearby. Store any food or scented item (including sealed items) in a secured food locker while camping in Yosemite—never in your tent or vehicle.

Residents and locals (or anyone who lives in bear habitat): please remember that we often see an increase in bear incidents and sightings in neighborhoods in the fall as bears are looking for high-calorie foods to fatten up for hibernation. Please keep all doors and windows closed and latched in unoccupied homes and offices. Additionally, pick any remaining fruit from your fruit trees, and make sure other attractants are not stored outside your home. Although it’s always fun to see a bear, a bear in the neighborhood is at risk getting into trouble quickly.

Where are the bears? Bear Tracker displays data transmitted via satellite from the Bear Team’s state-of-the-art GPS bear collars, making it available to you to remotely explore the lives of these amazing animals. Please note: Data is delayed to protect the current location of bears.

Slow Down!

So far, 20 bears have been hit by vehicles. Please protect wildlife by obeying speed limits and being prepared to stop for animals in roadways.

Let us know if you see a bear, no matter where it is or what it's doing. Call 209/372-0322 or send an email.

Learn more about bear biology and bear management in Yosemite.

Other Wildlife Sightings

Mountain lion observations have been reported recently in El Portal. For more information on mountain lions in Yosemite National Park, please visit https://www.nps.gov/yose/naturescience/mountainlion.htm.

Note: A bear incident occurs when a bear causes a monetary loss to a person--that is, if the bear causes property damage or obtains food. Bear incidents also include cases of bears causing injury to a person (which are fairly uncommon).

Last updated: September 20, 2017

Contact the Park

Mailing Address:

PO Box 577
Yosemite National Park, CA 95389

Phone:

(209) 372-0200

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