Half Dome Corridor: Two Rescues in One Day

August 25, 2014 Posted by: Yosemite Search and Rescue
View of Half Dome and subdome from Olmsted Point






















At approximately 9:30 pm on Wednesday, August 20, two Yosemite Search and Rescue (YOSAR) responders, hiking on the Mist Trail (which starts east of Yosemite Valley and parallels the Merced River), arrived at the bottom of the Nevada Fall switchbacks to assist a 71-year-old male hiker. The subject had reached the top of Half Dome a few hours earlier, and was complaining of exhaustion and sore feet. He was hiking with his adult daughter and her friend. 

The subject's Half Dome story begins a week earlier, when he bought new hiking boots at an outdoor recreation store. The salesperson advised the subject not to wear his new boots on his upcoming Half Dome hike, since new boots that haven't been broken in on shorter hikes often cause hot spots, blisters, and soreness on a long, strenuous hike like the Half Dome hike. Even so, the subject chose to wear his new boots. 

The subject and his group started hiking at 6:30 am on Wednesday. The subject reported that he did not eat breakfast and did not pack any food for his hike; he received granola bars and snacks from other hikers along the trail. The subject brought drinking water, which he consumed during the day; when he ran out of water, his daughter and her friend shared their remaining water with him. Early on during the hike to Half Dome, somewhere near the top of Vernal Fall (1.5 miles and 1,000 feet in elevation above the trailhead) the subject's daughter and her friend suggested that the subject return to the trailhead, explaining to him that he already appeared tired. The subject insisted that he wanted to continue hiking. 

Looking up at the cables from the subdomeThe group of three arrived at the base of the Half Dome cables in the afternoon, around 2:30 pm. The subject's daughter immediately felt anxious as she started up the cables; she panicked, stopped her ascent, and descended back down the cables with her friend. They implored the subject not to proceed up the cables, but he continued his ascent. The subject's daughter and her friend then hiked down the sub dome to the Half Dome permit checkpoint, where they waited for the subject. At approximately 4:30 pm, a guided hiking group arrived at the checkpoint after descending the cables and the sub dome, and the subject's daughter asked the group if they had seen her father. The group recalled seeing him approaching the top of the cable route around 3:30 pm, appearing exhausted. The hiking group contacted the Yosemite Emergency Communications Center (ECC), conveying concern on behalf of the subject's daughter (whose cell phone didn't have reception at that location). The daughter (via the hiking group) requested immediate assistance for her father. After speaking by phone with a ranger assigned to the case, members of the hiking group went back up the sub dome in an attempt to locate the subject. They called back 20 minutes later, reporting that they had found the subject and were accompanying him back down to his daughter and her friend. 

At approximately 6 pm, the subject's daughter, using her own cell phone, called the ECC, reporting that her group of three had run out of food and water and were stopped at the Half Dome-John Muir Trail junction (about two miles below the summit of Half Dome). A YOSAR responder stationed at the Little Yosemite Valley Ranger Station (3.5 miles below the summit of Half Dome) called the subject's daughter and counseled her to proceed downhill to the ranger station; when the threesome arrived, they were given food and water, and then they resumed their hike downhill. 

The subject was exhausted and his feet were in pain, so the group's progress was extremely slow. As darkness fell, with only one small flashlight and no map between the three of them, they became confused about the trail system and which way to go to reach the trailhead. The two YOSAR responders who arrived at their location at 9 pm assisted the subject in hiking out; on the treacherous Vernal Fall steps, one of the two rescuers trailed behind the subject, holding onto his backpack from behind, while the other positioned himself in front of the subject, offering a hand to prevent the subject from pitching forward and falling. The group reached the trailhead at 12:30 am. 

Looking down Half Dome cables toward the subdomeIn the meantime, a separate rescue effort for another Half Dome hiker was underway. The wife of a 58-year-old male hiker called the Yosemite ECC at approximately 9 pm to report that her husband, who had "no cartilage left in his knees," had successfully hiked up to the top of Half Dome earlier in the day, but the hike back downhill was proving difficult. The hiking party had run out of water but still had food; the subject's wife was advised to have the subject rest and eat, while a ranger set off on the trail to find the subject and assess his condition. Upon arriving at the subject's location, on the switchbacks of the John Muir Trail below Clark Point, it was clear to the ranger that the subject simply could not hike any farther, so he requested a litter team. The litter team carried the subject down to the trailhead; the rescue was complete by approximately 1:15 am. 

Key components for making any given hiking adventure safe and successful are (1) having an adequate fitness level for the chosen hike and (2) knowing the limits of your own physical abilities. In the case of the second rescue, had the subject tried a shorter uphill hike before attempting the Half Dome hike, it is possible he would have discovered that his knees could not handle the stress of hiking back downhill. Half Dome hikers routinely underestimate the level of difficulty of the hike; from the trailhead at Happy Isles, in Yosemite Valley, to the top of Half Dome, the trail gains 4,800 feet in elevation, and the hike is 14 to 16 miles round trip, depending on which route hikers use. Most hikers take 10 to 12 hours to hike up and back (please note, permits to hike to the top of Half Dome are required seven days a week when the cables are up). Proper preparation is also critical. For a strenuous all-day hike like the Half Dome hike, bringing plenty of drinking water (1 gallon is recommended), food, a headlamp or flashlight for each member of the hiking group, and a detailed map is a must. As the first rescue illustrates, wearing proper footwear helps prevent problems from developing on the Half Dome hike: choose comfortable, well broken-in shoes or boots with good traction and ankle support (tennis shoes are not recommended).

28 Comments Comments icon

  1. October 12, 2016 at 05:26
     

    Just got back from hiking Half Dome and cannot stress enough the importance of being prepared. Start no later than 5:00 a.m. Make sure you have a good headlamp (with extra batteries). Be prepared for the steps at Vernal Falls--they're brutal! If you have knee problems, take the John Muir route up instead. It's a little longer, but your knees will thank you for avoiding the steps (especially if you have short legs!). Take plenty of water and a water filter. You WILL need it! Make sure you eat a good dinner the night before as well as a good breakfast before the hike. Take plenty of food and high energy snacks--you will need those, too. You will be surprised at how taxing this hike is. I live in Park City, Utah and hike the Rockies at least 3 times a week, live at 8,200 feet elevation, and hike strenuous hikes all year long, and this hike was brutal--the steps at Vernal Falls, the length of the hike (about 20 miles if you take the John Muir back down and have to park on the access road before the trailhead parking lot if it's full. If you pace yourself and take appropriate rests, it can easily be a 15-hour day, Next time I go, I plan on hiking in, camping over, and doing the Dome the 2nd day. Now let's talk frankly about safety on the Dome itself. I'm surprised nobody's mentioned this: WEAR A CLIMBING HARNESS AND TIE TO THE CABLES!!! I cannot stress this enough! Sure, it may take you longer to tie and un-tie, and you may get the stink-eye from those behind you, but it's your life on the line (no pun intended). I wore a harness (and noticed that only a few others did as well), and on the way up as several "hot shots" passed me (some on the OUTSIDE of the cables--DON'T DO THAT!!) one climber was in such a rush she accidently kicked the board at the base of a set of poles. It flipped up and whacked both of us in the shins. It hit with such force she had to turn around and go back down because she was injured. I almost let go of the cables with the sudden pain of the impact. If I hadn't been tethered onto the cables I could have easily gone off the Dome. Not kidding, folks... tether yourself on. It's worth the extra time it takes to hike up. I also found the harness helpful at about 2/3 of the way up. The slope gets so steep that it becomes extremely difficult. You literally have to pull yourself up. Some climbers were having a VERY difficult time as their arms began to get tired and shaky. If someone's arm strength gave out and they let go and didn't have a harness..... SAFETY, SAFETY, SAFETY. Be respectful of other hikers, especially on the cables. It's not Disneyland. On the descent, some hikers found it easier to descend going backwards (facing upslope) and others commented that it was better mentally to just keep looking at your feet instead of the abyssal drop-offs all around you. However you do it, just pace yourself, go slow, and be safe while you move at your own comfort level. And if you see someone that needs help (food, water, etc) please offer it. It's an incredible experience. Just do your homework and do it safely! Happy trails!

     
  2. August 25, 2016 at 09:25
     

    Summited Half Dome this summer. It was the most intense thing I've done in a while. We hiked from Glacier Point to Little Yosemite Valley the night before, which gave us plenty of time to reach and climb the cables. Hiking shoes with good grippy soles, latex dipped cotton work gloves ($4.50-Home Depot), and trekking poles for hike up and down were invaluable. We easily consumed a gallon of water each and had a water filter at the campsite. A good breakfast and nibbling on powerbars kept us going. The info from the NPS was very helpful. Don't hike unprepared. It's not fair to the good folks who must rescue you.

     
  3. September 09, 2015 at 11:20
     

    Just came back from a hike from Tamarack Flat to the top of El Capitan and back (17 mis. round trip). Ran into two emergency situations along the way. The first involved finding a backpack that had been laid near the edge of a tall rock cliff about one mile north of El Capitan. After yelling out and getting no answer and finding a wallet with identification in the backpack, I decided to call 911 to report the incident, which occurred about 4:30 pm. To my surprise and disgust, my 911 calls (AT&T and Verizon) were not able to get signal until I had hiked an hour from the original spot. It's a good thing that I called 911 because the hiker had been reported missing 11 days earlier and a large-scale search was about to begin. However, with the delay in 911 service, a rescue operation was not launched until the following morning, when the hiker's body was discovered 1,000+ feet below where the backpack was found. Continuing on the trail back to Tamarack Flat and hearing someone yelling for help, I found a young hiker who had become separated from his party and who was unsure of the trail back to the Tamarack Flat trailhead. Although I led him back safely to the trailhead after dark, both he and I were unable for hours to get cell service to communicate with his party or to notify 911, thus resulting in frustration on our part and unnecessary anxiety on his party's part. This second incident ended well with the hiker being reunited with his party at the trailhead. From these two incidents, it is obvious to me that public safety is being jeopardized, severely and unnecessarily, by the lack of basic 911 and cellular coverage in Yosemite Nat'l Park. Considering that over four million visitors go to Yosemite each year, the 911 deficiencies there are simply unacceptable. I hope that these comments will at least alert park management and the public to these embarrassing, unjustifiable deficiencies in Yosemite's 911 service and will lead to much-needed upgrades to that service, If not, it's clear to me that people will die from emergencies in Yosemite when they could have been saved if adequate 911 service was promptly available.

     
  4. September 09, 2015 at 10:47
     

    Just came back from a hike from Tamarack Flat to the top of El Capitan and back (17 mis. round trip). Ran into two emergency situations along the way. The first involved finding a backpack that had been laid near the edge of a tall rock cliff about one mile north of El Capitan. After yelling out and getting no answer and finding a wallet with identification in the backpack, I decided to call 911 to report the incident, which occurred about 4:30 pm. To my surprise and disgust, my 911 calls (AT&T and Verizon) were not able to get signal until I had hiked an hour from the original spot. It's a good thing that I called 911 because the hiker had been reported missing 11 days earlier and a large-scale search was about to begin. However, with the delay in 911 service, a rescue operation was not launched until the following morning, when the hiker's body was discovered 1,000+ feet below where the backpack was found. Continuing on the trail back to Tamarack Flat and hearing someone yelling for help, I found a young hiker who had become separated from his party and who was unsure of the trail back to the Tamarack Flat trailhead. Although I led him back safely to the trailhead after dark, both he and I were unable for hours to get cell service to communicate with his party or to notify 911, thus resulting in frustration on our part and unnecessary anxiety on his party's part. This second incident ended well with the hiker being reunited with his party at the trailhead. From these two incidents, it is obvious to me that public safety is being jeopardized, severely and unnecessarily, by the lack of basic 911 and cellular coverage in Yosemite Nat'l Park. Considering that over four million visitors go to Yosemite each year, the 911 deficiencies there are simply unacceptable. I hope that these comments will at least alert park management and the public to these embarrassing, unjustifiable deficiencies in Yosemite's 911 service and will lead to much-needed upgrades to that service, If not, it's clear to me that people will die from emergencies in Yosemite when they could have been saved if adequate 911 service was promptly available.

     
  5. Bob
    August 19, 2015 at 10:00
     

    For what the info is worth: I think of myself as reasonably fit for a 71-year-old. I can cycle 70-80 miles though not at breakneck peloton speeds. My wife and I walk 2 and a half miles around the hill by our home every morning - for the past 8 years - with about 200 feet of elevation all together. We also have worked out at health clubs here in OC and in Chicago for the last 20 years. I climbed to the sub dome Thursday August 13 2015. Departed from Happy Isles parking lot at 6 am, carrying a sandwich, a lot of Clif bars and Shot Blocks (Cherry, with the caffein), a gallon of water, and a filter bottle just in case. (The gallon was just enough for the day). After reaching Vernal Falls up all those stairs I thought it was really too tough. But there was a trail to Nevada Falls through Clark Point and I thought even if I don't make the Dome I could still continue the hike to there, just for the fun of it, having got this far. By the time I got to Nevada Falls I thought I could do the rest, so I did. As others have written - assuming you are more or less in some kind of shape, have right shoes, water, etc - it's basically mental. Oh, and walking sticks were very helpful, both up and down. Reached the sub dome by around 1:45. There was no ranger and lots of gloves in the glove pit but I had a feeling I'd be pushing it too much, so I didn't go up. It took till 6 pm to get to the Happy Isles shuttle stop. Returning from Nevada Falls down the Mist Trail is brutal on the knees. But going back down that way gave me the thought that if I had continued in the morning from Vernal up the Mist, instead of the detour through Clark Point, it would have finished me. So next time, I'd go the same way - skipping the Mist Trail on the way up. Cables next time, and an earlier start. It's a wonderful hike!

     
  6. January 13, 2015 at 01:43
     

    Fitness was not the issue:In march 1998 John & I hit the trail head without waterproof boots on a path to half Dome it wasn't snowing now but it was on the road trip up. John said it was ok to camp off trail for a snow camp cheek (60+ lbs packs) as long as we made it to the ridge line.At Vernal Falls we made a right turn and cross a roped off trail it was 3:45 and we thought we could still make camp above.The snow trail went from above the ankles to knee high and worst walking got slow we heard many small avalanche's all the way up 98 was a strong El whatever weather year. We came to a spot where we could see the ridge but not the trail ahead ,so the ridge it was,very steep & with the packs we still tried to kick in steeps & poled until we could see it wasn't going to be safe. We camped lower than we should'a but we were glad we had good gear.We picked a place we thought was safe from slides so I leveled a place buy the trail with walking pole & setup. we are inside a NFace nebula tent I've got my Marmot Colair bag and john had two skimpy bags together that didn't work well he's cold & put his 8k meter NF coat, all night his legs were cold. When we woke up it was cold & the sun never got to are side, we eeeeat good and Thank God it wasn't snowing overnight or today, we would have been in trouble without help. yes are feet were cold & putting tho's boots on wet was hell O I'm Frozen & your cold foot is just going to get Frozen walking though the snow many miles I'll never hike without being fully equipped anymore ...once it was so steep with the heavy pack John did a endo yep MX talk for over the top and rolled lol, we were both 1989 world's toughest triathlon finishers(john only 1 in 86 tahoe tribute front page read Millbrae man won't be denied) and that took over 12 hours for each of us,this wasn't the walk in the park you'd want, be safe out there!

     
  7. September 04, 2014 at 05:24
     

    I did the hike while on Chemotherapy drugs for Crohns Disease. I only made it to the subdome. I really wanted to get to the top but my disease had interrupted my fitness program and I knew that turning around was the right decision. We hiked in well worn hiking boots. We took hiking poles and each of us had 5 litres of water plenty of food and clothing just in case we hit a summer thunderstorm. The night before we had eaten Italian for the Carbs and we had a big breakfast before setting off. We carried lights as we hiked in the darkness at the start of the hike. We took the long way back down the JM trail to save on the possibility of taking a tumble down the steep paths of both falls! We took 14 hours and we were down to the last half litre of water when we arrived at the first available fresh water near the beginning of the trail. We couldnt believe the number of people we saw hiking with very little in the way of food, water or any decent equipment. Lots of people in runners! Cant believe what happened to the father what was he thinking? Considering we have no real mountains like Half Dome in Australia I think we were very sensible in our preparations using the Yosmite NP site to read what was required for the hike. Taking plenty of water was a no brainer being Aussies. Cant wait to go back to Yosemite again! Happy hiking everyone!

     
  8. Tim
    September 01, 2014 at 01:40
     

    I think there is a case to be made that the lottery system puts pressure on people to go when maybe there is some reason they should wait a day or two. I must also admit that I am biased because I think the concept of a National Park is that attractions such as Half Dome should be made accessible rather than restricted. If the issue was strictly about safety, they would have put in a second set of cables instead of the restrictions. The real reason for the lottery has to do with politics and the Wilderness Act. So called “environmentalist” who mostly stay at home in places such as San Francisco rather than get out and actually enjoy the wilderness, believe that wilderness areas should be “preserved” so people who never get out will know they exist rather than enjoyed first hand for their beauty by those of us who do get out. During a recent review process, at least one environmental organization made a serious proposal that the trail access and Half Dome should be closed permanently so that people who never get up and go anywhere would know it is safely preserved in its “natural” state. Safety was not the primary motivation for the lottery – it was a decision to accept a very strict interpretation of the Wilderness Act promoted by radical groups. Being consistent in my belief that people should be allowed to experience nature rather than restricted, I think education and availability of safety information is vital and possibly could be improved, but ultimately people have to decide for themselves whether they should attempt this very challenging hike, and then at various points along the way, whether it is safe to proceed. The very dedicated members of YOSAR function to assist people who get in trouble, not to be judgmental, collect money, or become a new form of restriction – they should be thanked for their hard work. People should also realize that the hike up is very strenuous, but the hike down is more punishing on joints and feet. The John Muir Trail is much easier than the Mist Trail going up and down.

     
  9. August 31, 2014 at 01:06
     

    city slickers

     
  10. August 31, 2014 at 06:02
     

    I have summited Half Dome five times. Each person has their own limitations. I have found it best to pace yourself, take ample water, and a flashlight. The trail can be very slippery, if not using boots with good traction, especially on the way down. With loose pebbles, on hard granite, it is very easy to slip and fall. Gloves and webbing are recommended on the cables. Always hike with a buddy. Starting from Glacier Point, and ending at Happy Isles is an easier hike, but you'll need someone to drop you off and pick you up. The hike is VERY STRENUOUS. Most people are not used to hiking with the extra weight of a backpack, let alone the 8,000+ height at the summit. I made it to the top and the view is spectacular.

     
  11. August 29, 2014 at 08:36
     

    This is an awesome hike. I've done it twice - once while I was a Curry Camp maid and once with my two children. It is tough but very manageable if you take your time! The cables are scary but so worth it. Prepare and don't hike stupid.

     
  12. August 29, 2014 at 08:14
     

    This reminds me of my mothers adage when I first started scouting "Stay with the group". Having recently attempted the climb, and been rumbled away from the dome despite a 6 am start, I can assure you that your winning lottery pass comes with quite clear instructions, even a video, describing what you need to do to be prepared.

     
  13. August 29, 2014 at 12:11
     

    When I worked at Camp Curry during my college summers in the early-mid ‘60s, a good friend and fellow Curry employee and I would run the Mist Trail (to the top of Vernal) and back as a 4-day-a-week workout. After 6 weeks of that routine, only then was I in shape to summit Half Dome – early morning, back by noon...and more than once.Not everyone that climbs HD is in perfect shape, but mentally you’d better be – no breakfast, new boots, and little water - ?? Wow. If there’s one little suggestion I would make to Yosemite’s NPS staff…try considering the idea of “renting” satellite phones to hikers. Programmed for Yosemite’s Search & Rescue, with simple instructions by the park staff when obtaining the phone. To think of all the trouble…and maybe lives…this just might save. Just sayin’…

     
  14. Tom
    August 29, 2014 at 12:11
     

    I completed the hike in July with my family... we had plenty of food and two water filters. You will need to pump water on the way back down (if not the way back up as well). We hiked Vernal and Nevada on the way up and John Muir on the way down. It was 20 miles with the hike from the campground and the walking on top of halfdome. The first two miles and the last two miles are the most difficult. Be prepared... the cables may be scary but the view at the top is worth it!

     
  15. August 28, 2014 at 11:33
     

    I have very little experience with hiking but I know enough not to be this idiotic. If they don't already, Yosemite needs to require a full physical from each hiker's doctor. Some kind of screening. And all gears checked to assure evrything needed is adequate. Still, glad to hear everyone made it out alive.

     
  16. August 28, 2014 at 10:56
     

    I agree with Phil....a water filtration system saved me. I brought a lot of water...so much so that my back was killing me but it was worth it! Still, the people I was with filtered me a couple of bottles more each way. But the amount of unprepared people I saw on the trail was astonishing.... a whole family with small children and no water who hadn't even reached the dome yet....???? Crazy. Just crazy. It took me a long time to go down simply because I didn't want to end up like these poor people. I took every step very carefully. 15 hours for me and probably 3 of that was rest time. Hour at Nevada, another on the dome, another at Nevada on the way back down. I highly recommend soaking your feet there while resting...really helped me! Bring a flashlight!!!! :-) You can do it!

     
  17. August 28, 2014 at 10:54
     

    No breakfast and no food?! WTF was he thinking?

     
  18. August 28, 2014 at 10:53
     

    Common sense and preparation is absolutely key for any outdoor activity.. especially for hiking. When I hiked Half Dome with my father we definitely noted countless individuals who didn't seem to note those things prior to beginning the challenging adventure. Hope those people recover and it serves as a lesson to everyone else not accustomed to the proper ways of the outdoors! Good job to the YOSAR for stepping up, btw.

     
  19. August 28, 2014 at 10:39
     

    With all the merchandise on the valley floor advertising 'I made it to the top' with pictures of Half Dome, people get the impression that it is an easy day hike. Maybe the permits should come with instructions for the inexperienced and unprepared. The first time I went up I researched. All the books and trail maps recommended it as a two day hike. They said it was equivalent to a 37 mile hike with a steep elevation climb. Not something to take lightly or to do without food or water.

     
  20. August 28, 2014 at 10:14
     

    Having hiked Half Dome before the permits, I'm glad to hear the crowds are more controlled now since the scariest part was all the people going up and down the cables at once. And really, why are people going out on such a long and difficult hike without all of them carrying their own 10 essentials! Hiking basics...plus knowing your own limits. Definitely a memorable hike. Just do it right!

     
  21. August 28, 2014 at 09:33
     

    People hiking in groups should always make sure everyone in the party has all the necessary preparation, water, food & equipment to complete the hike. Don't go unless everyone is prepared to take care of themselves.

     
  22. August 28, 2014 at 09:25
     

    Having hiked half dome several times both in a single attempt and over two days, I feel common sense was severely lacking in these individuals. The Half Dome hike is not difficult if you are aware and prepared. Common sense and a little bit of outdoor knowledge goes a long way. Make sure if you are planning on using a water filter that you check to see stream levels. Do not expect water to be available to filter once you leave Little Yosemite Valley and head towards Clouds Rest or Half Dome.

     
  23. August 28, 2014 at 09:16
     

    While I certainly hope the two rescued individuals are recovering, I also hope that they are charged for the rescue services. This is simply irresponsible and reckless.

     
  24. August 28, 2014 at 09:08
     

    This is an adventure trip I would love to make but reading some of these comments is scaring the crap out of me.

     
  25. August 28, 2014 at 08:57
     

    I feel more people should be informed about the amount of water it takes to hike to the top of Half Dome and back. After the 2nd trip I finally bought a water filtration system, worth its weight in gold. Never totally out of water, with the Merced right there at the half way point up and down.

     
  26. August 28, 2014 at 08:41
     

    Why does ego keep getting people in trouble? Why don't people realize that some one may die rescuing their stupid butts because they cannot admit that some things are beyond their abilities? There should be a fine or a charge every time someone needs to be rescued. Maybe that will stop some of these morons from putting their lives and the lives of others in danger! If it isn't skiing output side the boundaries, hiking too high or beyond your limits, feeding bison and trying to take a picture of your child on one, the twits will always think of someway to do something they shouldn't.

     
  27. August 28, 2014 at 08:38
     

    I can that the unnecessary lottery system did no good for these people. The lottery is a dumb idea, the only time people have ever been killed on the cables is during inclement weather or when the cables are down. More needless government control over our lives. Helicopter parents for all of us.

     
  28. August 28, 2014 at 08:30
     

    Best to stay the night in little Yosemite camp just past navada falls and get some rest and accustomed to some elevation. Then have a good breakfast and pack some carbs and protein for your journey. And bring plenty of water. If you don't feel well one you get to the dome, don't do it. You made it there! ...injoy the view and the trip you did make. Be safe. Happy trails :)

     
 
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Last updated: August 29, 2014

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