Nearby Attractions

Dead Horse Ranch State Park

Dead Horse Ranch State Park

Dead Horse Ranch State Park is located adjacent to and across the Verde River from the community of Cottonwood. It is centrally located near several major population centers such as Flagstaff, Phoenix, and Prescott. When using Dead Horse Ranch as a base, one has a variety of attractions to visit, including: Jerome State Historic Park, Fort Verde State Historic Park, Red Rock State Park, Slide Rock State Park, Tuzigoot National Monument, Montezuma Castle and Well National Monuments, Oak Creek Canyon, Prescott National Forest, Coconino National Forest, and the popular towns of Sedona and Jerome.
 
Fort Verde Entrance Sign

Fort Verde State Historic Park

The site that is now Fort Verde State Historic Park was occupied by U.S. Army troops in the summer of 1870. Construction of the Fort began in 1871 and was completed by 1873. The Fort was an active primary military base during the Central Arizona Indian Wars. The installation was abandoned in April 1891 and the site was divided into small parcels and sold at auction.

The establishment of Fort Verde State Historic Park was the result of the dedication of Camp Verde citizens who recognized the importance of protecting our State’s heritage. The Camp Verde Improvement Association’s (CVIA) initial efforts were strongly supported by Harold and Margaret Hallett. The CVIA worked from the mid 1950’s until 1961 to save the remaining components of the Fort from destruction.

 

Honanki Heritage Site

Honanki and its sister site, Palatki, were the largest cliff dwellings of the Red Rock country between AD 1150 - 1350. The Sinagua, ancestors of the Hopi, lived here preparing meals, raising their families, and making tools from stone, leather, and wood. Nearby they hunted for deer and rabbit, tended various crops, and gathered edible wild plants. They were first described by Dr. Jesse Walter Fewkes, famous turn-of-the century archaeologist from the Smithsonian Institution, who gave them the Hopi names of Honanki (Badger House) and Palatki (Red House). The Hopi, however, have no specific names for these sites.
 
Montezuma Well
Montezuma Well

NPS Photo
Paul Santellan

Montezuma Well

The land around Montezuma Well has been home to many prehistoric groups of people since as early as 11,000 CE. The first historical groups came to the Verde Valley after Arizona became a territory in 1863. Today, visitors can still see the irrigation canal, picnic areas, and historic Back ranch house at Montezuma Well. Take your time as you explore the trails at Montezuma Well and discover the tranquility of a site still considered sacred by many local tribes. The shaded forest along the trail near the swallet ruin and the outlet provides welcome relief from the unrelenting Arizona sunshine. The temperature difference at the outlet can be up to 20 degrees cooler than along the rim of the Well, making it easy to imagine the people of the Sinagua culture spending the hot summer days in this tranquil setting.
 

Palatki Heritage Site

The Palatki Heritage Site and its sister site, Honanki, were the largest cliff dwellings of the Red Rock Country between AD 1150 - 1350. They were first described by Dr. Jesse Walter Fewkes, famous turn-of-the century archaeologist from the Smithsonian Institution, who gave them the Hopi names of Honanki (Badger House) and Palatki (Red House). The Hopi, however, have no specific names for these sites.
 
Jordan House

Sedona Heritage Museum

The Sedona Heritage Museum was once a homestead for the Jordan Family and is now, along with the Sedona Historical Society, working with the community to preserve the ever-growing history of Sedona. We focus on community events, education, history preservation, archives and restoration.
 
Tuzigoot
Tuzigoot National Monument

NPS Photo
Paul Santellan

Tuzigoot National Monument

Tuzigoot National Monument features a desert hilltop of an ancient pueblo. A child scans the desert landscape for the arrival of traders. What riches will they bring? What stories will they tell? From the rooftop of the Tuzigoot pueblo it is easy to imagine such a moment. The pueblo shows us this ancient village built by the Sinagua people. They were farmers and artists with trade connections that spanned hundreds of miles.
 
Petroglyphs from the V Bar V

V-V Heritage Site
V-V Heritage Site is the largest known petroglyph site in the Verde Valley, as well as being one of the best-preserved. Acquired by the Coconino National Forest in 1994, the site is protected and kept open to the visiting public for their enjoyment and opportunity to learn more about our national cultural heritage. As partners in this effort, both the Verde Valley Archaeological Society and the Friends of the Forest provide interpretive tours and on-site management.

 
VV Arch Center logo

Verde Valley Archaeology Center
The Verde Valley Archaeology Center preserves archaeological sites and collections, and makes them available for research and viewing. Explore American Indian history in the Verde Valley through the science of archaeology!

Official Nonprofit Partner of the National Park Service for Montezuma Castle and Tuzigoot and the Regional Coordinator for the Arizona Site Steward Program

Last updated: March 17, 2021

Contact the Park

Mailing Address:

P. O. Box 219
Camp Verde, AZ 86322

Phone:

(928) 567-3322

Contact Us