What’s Blooming at Barataria?

Four flowers with red petals. Green vegetation and water in background
Copper Iris in bloom at Barataria Preserve

NPS Photo

 

Are the Irises Blooming at Barataria Preserve?

In the spring, wildflowers fill every corner of Barataria Preserve. Although the giant blue iris population was greatly reduced for several years, they seem to be making a comeback. With the weather mild and bugs tame, spring is a great time to explore the trails at Barataria Preserve!


More information at these PDF links:
Giant Blue Irises
Spring Wildflowers of Barataria (list)

The Spring 2022 iris bloom is over. Other wildflowers will continue to bloom through the spring.

Check back here for updates on spring flower blooms at the preserve!

Flower

About

Spotted?

Copper Iris
Iris fulva

Found from Southern Illinois and Ohio to Louisiana then from Texas to Georgia.

No (Last bloom early May)

Giant Blue Iris
Iris giganticaerulea

Largest of the Louisiana Irises. Only found in Louisiana.

No (Last bloom early May)

Yellow flag Iris
Iris pseudacorus

This fast-spreading iris is beautiful, though some states consider it an invasive species and weed.

No (Last bloom early May)

Yellowtop
Packera glabella

Common name is Butterweed. Native to central and southeastern North America, it is toxic to humans.

Yes (4/29/22)
Spiderwort
Tradescantia virginiana
Grows wild along trails, but popular in gardens. Over 75 hybrids of Tradescantia species exist. Yes (5/11/22)
Evening Primrose

Oenothera speciosa

Many other common names such as: Pink Evening Primrose, Showy Evening Primrose, Mexican Evening Primrose, Pink Ladies, Buttercups/Pink Buttercups. Yes (5/11/22)
Lyreleaf Sage

Salvia lyrata

The exposed lower lip provides an excellent landing platform for bees. When a bee lands, the two stamens are tipped, and the insect is doused with pollen. Yes (3/25/22)
Louisiana Vetch
Vicia ludoviviana
Stems are several feet high, generally sprawling, prostrate or climbing over neighboring vegetation. Yes (3/25/22)
Spider Lily

Hymenocallis liriosme

A North American bulb-forming herb native to Texas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Mississippi, and Alabama. Yes (5/11/22)
Dewberry

Rubus pubescens

Has a fruit that looks much like blackberries. The fruits are sweet and juicy right off the plant, but can also be used in jams, jellies, and most recipes involving red raspberries. Yes (4/29/22)
Wild Onion

Allium canadense

Has an edible bulb covered with a dense skin of brown fibers. The plant also has strong onion odor and taste. Yes (5/11/22)
Japanese Honeysuckle
Lonicera japonica
Species of honeysuckle native to eastern Asia. It is often grown as an ornamental plant, but has become an invasive species in a number of countries. Yes (5/11/22)
Bull Tongue

Sagittaria lancifolia

Also known as Lanceleaf Arrowhead, Duck-potato, Bulltongue Arrowhead. Prevents shore erosion and provides an excellent food source for wildlife, making it an aquatic plant with environmental importance. Yes (5/11/22)
Daisy Fleabane
Erigeron spp.
Several species commonly referred to as daisy fleabane (Erigeron spp.) are native to Louisiana. They produce a rosette of leaves at the base and flowers that are about one-half to three-quarters of an inch in diameter. Yes
(3/25/22)

Barataria Preserve is not the only place to see wild irises in Louisiana. The following are all boardwalk trails within the Greater New Orleans area:

 
 

Spring in the Swamp: Past Years

Click on the year to see which flowers were observed and to learn about the flowers at Jean Lafitte's Barataria Preserve!

Barataria Preserve Spring 2021

Iris

About

Spotted?

Copper 
Iris fulva

Found from Southern Illinois and Ohio to Louisiana then from Texas to Georgia.

Last bloom (4/21/21)

Giant Blue
Iris giganticaerulea

Largest of the Louisiana Irises. Only found in Louisiana.

Last bloom (4/28/21)

Yellow flag 
Iris pseudacorus

This fast-spreading iris is beautiful, though some states consider it an invasive species and weed.

Last bloom (4/21/21)

Yellowtop
Packera glabella

Common name is Butterweed. Native to central and southeastern North America, it is toxic to humans.

Last bloom 
(4/28/21)
Spiderwort
Tradescantia virginiana
Grows wild along trails, but popular in gardens. Over 75 hybrids of Tradescantia species exist. Last bloom
(4/30/21)
Evening Primrose

Oenothera speciosa

Many other common names such as: Pink Evening Primrose, Showy Evening Primrose, Mexican Evening Primrose, Pink Ladies, Buttercups/Pink Buttercups. Last bloom 
(4/28/2021)
Lyreleaf Sage 

Salvia lyrata

 

The exposed lower lip provides an excellent landing platform for bees. When a bee lands, the two stamens are tipped, and the insect is doused with pollen. Last bloom
(4/28/2021)
Louisiana Vetch
Vicia ludoviviana
Stems are several feet high, generally sprawling, prostrate or climbing over neighboring vegetation. Last bloom (4/28/2021)
Spider Lily

Hymenocallis liriosme

AvNorth American bulb-forming herb native to Texas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Mississippi, and Alabama. Last bloom
(5/11/2021)
Dewberry

Rubus pubescens

Has a fruit that looks much like blackberries. The fruits are sweet and juicy right off the plant, but can also be used in jams, jellies, and most recipes involving red raspberries. Last bloom 
(4/28/2021)
Wild Onion

Allium canadense

Has an edible bulb covered with a dense skin of brown fibers. The plant also has strong onion odor and taste. Last bloom
(5/21/2021)
Japanese Honeysuckle
Lonicera japonica
Species of honeysuckle native to eastern Asia. It is often grown as an ornamental plant, but has become an invasive species in a number of countries.  Last bloom 
(4/28/2021)
Bull Tongue

Sagittaria lancifolia

Also known as Lanceleaf Arrowhead, Duck-potato, Bulltongue Arrowhead. Prevents shore erosion and provides an excellent food source for wildlife, making it an aquatic plant with environmental importance. Last bloom
(5/21/2021)
 

Last updated: May 11, 2022

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