Landscape Dynamics

Person setting up a large white "X" on the ground
A white X on the ground will help piece together aerial photos over a large area.

NPS

Fire. Wind storms. Development. Logging. Many activities—human and natural, within and outside park boundaries—affect the mosaic of a park’s landscape. Examining the pattern, arrangement, and interactions of landscape-scale changes can reveal effects to biological communities and ecosystem functions within parks.

Long-term Monitoring

  • Identify and measure landscape changes in and around the Great Lakes Network parks using moderate resolution satellite imagery and high resolution aerial photography.

  • Determine the type of change, the size of the affected area, and trends over time.

  • Complete analysis for each park every six years.

Our partner:

Kennedy Geospatial Lab, Oregon State University

Learn More

Briefs provide a one- or two-page overview of the latest findings and what they mean. Monitoring reports are in-depth technical reports that include data analyses and possibly management recommendations.

Briefs

Source: Data Store Saved Search 392. To search for additional information, visit the Data Store.

Monitoring Reports

Source: Data Store Saved Search 410. To search for additional information, visit the Data Store.

Monitoring Protocol

Protocol documents detail precisely how monitoring is carried out.

Kennedy, R., and others. 2010. Landsat-based monitoring of landscape dynamics in the national parks of the Great Lakes Inventory and Monitoring Network (version 1.0). Natural Resource Report. NPS/GLKN/NRR—2010/221. National Park Service. Fort Collins, Colorado.

Landsat-based standard operating procedures (SOPs) for the national parks of the Great Lakes Network.

Last updated: August 20, 2018