Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park Centennial Events for January 2016

Mauna Loa flow USGS
Mauna Loa lava flow erupted in March 1984

USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

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News Release Date: December 24, 2015

Contact: Jessica Ferracane, 808-985-6018

Hawaii National Park, HI – Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park celebrates its 100th anniversary in 2016, and continues its tradition of sharing Hawaiian culture and After Dark in the Park programs with the public in January.

The After Dark in the Park (ADIP) programs, which originated at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park 25 years ago, are dedicated to Volcano Awareness Month in January. The Tuesday night programs will be presented by USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory scientists.

January kicks off the centennial anniversary for Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, and the year-long Centennial After Dark in the Park & Hike Series. To find out what’s happening throughout 2016, visit the park website. It’s also the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service. To find centennial events at other national parks, visit Find Your Park

All ADIP and Hawaiian cultural programs are free, but park entrance fees apply. Programs are co-sponsored by the Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association, and your $2 donation helps support park programs. Mark the calendar for these upcoming events: 

Kīlauea Volcano’s East Rift and Summit Eruptions: Events of the Past Year. Kīlauea has erupted nearly continuously since 1983, when a vent, now called Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō, opened on the volcano’s East Rift Zone. Then, in 2008, a second vent opened at the summit of Kīlauea within Halema‘uma‘u Crater. Both eruptions continue today. Join Tina Neal, scientist-in-charge of the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, as she briefly describes the history of these two eruptions and provides in-depth accounts of volcanic activity during the past year, including the ongoing East Rift Zone lava flow that threatened the community of Pāhoa until March 2015 and the overflow of the summit lava lake in April-May 2015. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.
When: Tues., Jan. 5 at 7 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium 

Mauna Loa: Eruptive History and Current Status of Earth’s Largest Active Volcano. When Mauna Loa erupts, voluminous, fast-moving lava flows can reach the ocean in only a few hours, severing roads and utilities and repaving the volcano’s flanks along the way. Since 1843, Mauna Loa has erupted 33 times, most recently in 1984, when lava flows reached to within 4 miles (6.4 km) of Hilo. In September 2015, the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) raised the Volcano Alert Level of Mauna Loa from “NORMAL” to “ADVISORY” due to increased seismicity and deformation. HVO scientist Asta Miklius talks about recent activity at Mauna Loa and the current status of the volcano. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.
When: Tues., Jan. 12 at 7 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium 

Hū (Kukui Nut Top) Demonstration. Early Hawaiians devoted much time to games, amusements, and relaxing. Top-spinning was an absorbing activity for children and making hū (kukui nut tops) was equally engaging. The top is spun by a stem inserted in a mature kukui nut. Join park rangers and staff from Hawaii Pacific Parks Association as they share their knowledge and love this popular traditional art and pastime. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing ‘Ike Hana No‘eau “Experience the Skillful Work” workshops. Free.
When: Wed., Jan. 13 from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai 

Centennial Series After Dark in the Park: Lethal Eruptions at Kīlauea – It’s Not the Volcano’s Fault. Volcanic activity from Kīlauea produces both lava flows and explosive eruptions. Both types of activity occur about equally often and both have killed people and destroyed property. The most recent fatality from an explosive eruption occurred when a man was crushed by a boulder ejected from Kīlauea in 1924, and last year, Kīlauea flows destroyed astructure outside of the national park. Volcanic disasters happen when people are caught by these natural events. We can’t control the volcano, but, in a perfect world, we can control our presence on the volcano. The world isn’t perfect, however, and that’s where the problems come in. Don Swanson, research geologist at the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, discusses past lethal eruptions, why they were deadly, and what we can expect in the future. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.
When: Tues., Jan. 19 at 7 p.m. 
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium 

Centennial Hike: Into the Volcano. Join Park Ranger Dean Gallagher and witness the explosive evidence of Kīlauea volcano’s not-so-distant past on this moderately difficult 2.7-mile roundtrip hike to the floor of Kīlauea caldera. Sturdy footwear, water, light rain gear, sun protection, and a snack are recommended. About two hours.
When: Sat., Jan. 23 at 10 a.m. 
Where: Meet at Kīlauea Visitor Center

Mauna Loa 1880-81 Eruption: The Lava Flow That Came to Hilo. Within the last 160 years, five eruptions sent lava flows to within 10 miles (16 km) of Hilo Bay. The 1880-1881 Mauna Loa eruption came the closest, with a flow that posed an immediate threat to Hilo and its beautiful bay. During the eruption, Princess Regent Lili‘uokalani and Princess Ruth Ke‘elikōlani led the efforts to save Hilo town. As residents offered both Christian prayers and appeals to Pelehonuamea, the Hawaiian volcano deity, preparations were also made to dig ditches, construct rock barriers, and blast dynamite in attempts to divert the advancing lava streams. After more than nine months, the lava flow stopped, but less than a mile from the bay front. USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory scientist Jim Kauahikaua and HVO volunteer Ben Gaddis will present the story of this Mauna Loa eruption using maps, art, and photographs of the lava flow that came to Hilo. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.
When: Tues., Jan. 26 at 7 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium 

Mark Yamanaka in Concert. Come enjoy beautiful island music with Hilo’s own Mark Yamanaka, a nine-time Nā Hōkū Hanohano award-winning singer and songwriter. Mark will share original songs from his CDs, Lei Pua Kenikeni and Lei Maile. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing Nā Leo Manu “Heavenly Voices” presentations. Free.
When: Wed., Jan. 20 from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium 

Hei: Traditional Hawaiian String Figures. Join Pele Kaio, a kumu hula (hula teacher) from Hilo, to learn about hei, or string figures, used by ancient Hawaiians to aid them in remembering long oral histories. Pele Kaio was introduced to the ritual of hei by his kumu (teacher), Dr. Taupōuri Tangarō, and has developed his own unique understanding of its function. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing ‘Ike Hana No‘eau “Experience the Skillful Work” workshops. Free.
When: Wed., Jan. 27 from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai 

-NPS-



Last updated: December 24, 2015

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