Non-Native Mountain Goat Management Qualified Volunteer Program

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The application period for the 2020 has closed as the target number of applications was reached.

Qualified Volunteers to Begin Culling Non-Native Mountain Goats in Grand Teton National Park.

The culling of non-native mountain goats from Grand Teton National Park began September 14 as part of a management plan to conserve a native and vulnerable population of Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep in the Teton Range.
 
Rock and snow filled canyon with bright blue sky

NPS/Bonney

In order to aid in the conservation of a native and vulnerable population of Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep in the Teton Range, the National Park Service is implementing a management plan to remove non-native mountain goats from the park.

The National Park Service has a responsibility to protect native species and reduce the potential for local extinction of a native species and therefore intends to reduce the number of non-native mountain goats in the park as quickly as possible. Mountain goats are not native to Grand Teton National Park. Non-native mountain goats threaten the native Teton Range bighorn sheep herd through increased risk of pathogen transmission and the potential for competition.  

Without swift and active management, the non-native mountain goat population is expected to continue to grow and expand its distribution within the park. The population is currently at a size where complete removal is achievable in a short time, however, the growth rate of this population suggests that complete removal in the near future may become unattainable.

The Teton Range is home to a small herd of native bighorn sheep currently estimated at approximately 100 animals. This herd is one of the smaller and most isolated in Wyoming, and has never been extirpated or augmented. The Teton Range herd of native bighorn sheep is of high conservation value to the park, adjacent land and wildlife managers, and visitors.  

Currently the non-native mountain goat population within the park is estimated at approximately 100 animals.
 

General Information

Grand Teton National Park is seeking an applicant pool to select qualified volunteers to assist with the lethal removal of non-native mountain goats from the mountainous regions of the park. Removal operations will take place in as many as 10 different management zones as delineated, see section below. Access to and from these zones will involve long travel distances on foot, limited or no horse access, water crossings (including Jackson Lake), and travel in high-altitude mountainous terrain. Access in some cases may occur across USDA Forest Service lands (Caribou-Targhee National Forest) from the west side of the Tetons. However, participants will be required to begin and end their participation at park headquarters in Moose, Wyoming. Volunteers will be responsible for obtaining their own lodging (if needed) and transportation. Most campgrounds in the area close on or near October 1, and depending on snow fall, camping may be accessible on the Bridger-Teton National Forest. The town of Jackson, 13 miles south of Moose, has a wide variety of hotels and restaurants that remain open year-round to include grocery and outfitter stores. Public facilities and amenities may be limited due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.
 

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    Project Goals

    The objective of this effort is to use qualified volunteer teams to assist in the safe eradication of non-native mountain goats in Grand Teton National Park, and, when safe to do so, to remove the edible portions of the animals. Volunteer teams must consist of no fewer than two people and may be as large as six people; teams will be assigned a management zone to operate in. Each team will designate a team leader who is responsible for organizing their team. The volunteer team will attempt to locate and shoot non-native mountain goats within their assigned zone. Volunteers are expected to retrieve and field process carcasses (when reasonable), collect biological samples and gather other statistical information. Volunteers may need to hike up to 20 miles per day at altitude in extremely rough mountainous terrain under a variety of weather conditions (i.e., wind, rain, snow, and below freezing temperatures). Elevations in the park range from 6,320’ to 13,775’ and volunteers can expect to pursue most non-native mountain goats in 3rd through 5th class terrain at elevations ranging from 9,000’ to 12,500’. Teams may take as many non-native mountain goats as is reasonable for their given situation and reasonably attempt to harvest the edible portions from the animals they take. The goal of this culling operation is the safe eradication of non-native mountain goats within the boundaries of the park. Overnight storage of carcasses in the field will be strongly discouraged due to the park’s expanding grizzly bear population and healthy black bear population. Carcasses that are difficult to access or remove may be left on the landscape after being photographed and pinpointed utilizing a GPS. Park management will assign teams to management zones that will maximize potential success, support management priorities, and avoid wildlife or visitor-use conflicts.

    Additional questions: e-mail us or call 307-739-3651.
     
    Map of Mountain Goat Management Zones
    Map of Mountain Goat Management Zones (Click for Higher Resolution)

    NPS Graphic

    Management Zones

    Culling operations will take place in as many as 5 different management zones as delineated on the map. Access to and from these zones will involve long travel distances on foot, limited or no horse access, water crossings (including Jackson Lake), and travel in high-altitude mountainous terrain. Access in some cases may occur across USDA Forest Service lands (Caribou-Targhee National Forest) from the west side of the Tetons. However, participants will be required to begin and end their participation at park headquarters in Moose, Wyoming.
     
    Zone Area Access
    1 Berry Creek to Webb Canyon Difficult access due to remoteness. Access via Glade Creek trailhead, or via watercraft across Jackson Lake. This zone is also accessible from the Caribou-Targhee National Forest. If accessing the zone through Caribou-Targhee National Forest, be sure to follow the forest’s rules and regulations, particularly those regarding stock-use in this area. Volunteers with stock may camp at the designated Berry Creek horse camp near Hechtman Creek. Stock use is limited to maintained trails and the off-trail areas designated in the park compendium.
    2 Moran Canyon Very difficult access and travel, with no trails in this zone. Access via watercraft across Jackson Lake, via Leigh Lake Trailhead (trail ends at Trapper Lake), or via the Caribou-Targhee National Forest. If accessing the zone through Caribou-Targhee National Forest, be sure to follow the forest’s rules and regulations, particularly those regarding stock-use in this area. Stock use not allowed in this zone.
    3 Leigh Canyon Very difficult access and travel, with no trails in this zone. Access via canoe across Leigh Lake, via Leigh Lake Trailhead or via the Caribou-Targhee National Forest. If accessing the zone through Caribou-Targhee National Forest, be sure to follow the forest’s rules and regulations, particularly those regarding stock-use in this area. Stock use not allowed in this zone.
    4 Paintbrush Canyon Access via the Leigh Lake trailhead. A heavily used trail bisects this zone. Stock use limited to maintained trails and day use only.
    5 Hanging Canyon Access via the String Lake trailhead or South Jenny Lake trailhead. Stock use not allowed in this zone.
    6 North & South Forks of Cascade Access via South Jenny Lake or String Lake trailheads. Heavily used trail exists in the bottom of the North and South Forks of Cascade Canyon. Volunteers may camp with stock at the designated horse camp in the South Fork of Cascade Canyon. Stock use limited to maintained trails.
    7 Lower Cascade Canyon Access via South Jenny Lake or String Lake trailheads on a maintained trail. Stock use limited to maintained trails.
    8 Teewinot to Garnet Canyon Access via Lupine Meadows or Moose Ponds trailheads. A heavily used trail reaches Amphitheater Lake and Garnet Canyon. Stock use limited to maintained trails.
    9 Avalanche Canyon Very difficult access and travel, with no trails in this zone. Access via Bradley-Taggart Trailhead or via the Caribou-Targhee National Forest. If accessing the zone through Caribou-Targhee National Forest, be sure to follow the forest’s rules and regulations, particularly those regarding stock-use in the area. Stock use not allowed in this zone.
    10 Death Canyon to Granite Canyon Access via Death Canyon Trailhead, or via foot from the Caribou-Targhee National Forest. If accessing the zone through Caribou-Targhee National Forest, be sure to follow the forest’s rules and regulations, particularly those regarding stock-use in the area. Stock use limited to maintained trails.
     

    Frequently Asked Questions


    What is the goal of this program? The goal is to eradicate non-native mountain goats within the boundaries of Grand Teton National Park as quickly as possible. Without intervention, non-native mountain goats could transmit pathogens to or displace native Teton bighorn sheep on very limited winter range and optimal summer habitat.

    Why is the park eradicating non-native mountain goats from the Teton range? Non-native mountain goats were introduced into the Snake River Range in Idaho and over the years, expanded their population and reached the Teton Range. Non-native mountain goats can carry bacterial diseases that are lethal to bighorn sheep. The Teton Range bighorn sheep population has been relatively isolated and are therefore likely ‘naïve’ to these diseases.

    What is the anticipated time frame for meeting this goal? The timing and duration of removal efforts will ultimately depend on weather, density and distribution of non-native mountain goats, and the success of the qualified volunteers. Additional removal and monitoring operations may be required to ensure non-native mountain goats do not return.

    Has the park already begun the lethal removal of non-native mountain goats? Yes, in February 2020, an NPS-authorized contractor removed 36 non-native mountain goats using aerial-based lethal removal methods authorized in the park’s non-native mountain goat management plan.

    Is this the first-time ground-based lethal removal will be tried? Yes.

    Are there options for non-lethal removal like live capture and translocation in the plan? Yes, those options exist in the plan but are currently not being implemented. Investigations were made to gauge interest from other states for a capture and translocation effort, but past capture success (15 goats in 5 years of trying) and the resulting costs, coupled with the known disease history of the source population of these non-native mountain goats (Snake River Range, ID/WY) did not garner much interest.

    Is this an approved management plan? Yes, a Finding of No Significant Impact was signed by the acting regional director, National Park Service Regional Office Serving Department of Interior Regions 5, 6, 7, 8 & 9 in September 2019, supporting the Mountain Goat Management Plan Environmental Assessment.

    What is the authority to conduct this type of activity in a national park? The John D. Dingell, Jr. Conservation, Management and Recreation Act (54 USC 104909)

    SEC. 2410. WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT IN PARKS.



    (a) In General.--Chapter 1049 of title 54, United States Code (as amended by section 2409(a)), is amended by adding at the end the following:

    ``Sec. 104909. <<NOTE: 54 USC 104909.>> Wildlife management in parks



    ``(a) Use of qualified volunteers.--If the Secretary determines it is necessary to reduce the size of a wildlife population on System land in accordance with applicable law (including regulations), the Secretary may use qualified volunteers to assist in carrying out wildlife management on System land.

    ``(b) Requirements for qualified volunteers.--qualified volunteers providing assistance under subsection (a) shall be subject to--

    ``(1) any training requirements or qualifications established by the Secretary; and

    ``(2) any other terms and conditions that the Secretary may require.



    ``(c) Donations.--The Secretary may authorize the donation and distribution of meat from wildlife management activities carried out under this section, including the donation and distribution to Indian Tribes, qualified volunteers, food banks, and other organizations that work to address hunger, in accordance with applicable health guidelines and such terms and conditions as the Secretary may require.''.

    (b) Clerical Amendment.--The table of sections for chapter 1049 of title 54 (as amended by section 2409(b)), United States Code, <<NOTE: 54 USC 104901 prec.>> is amended by inserting after the item relating to section 104908 the following:



    ``104909. Wildlife management in parks.''.

    Is Grand Teton National Park collaborating with partners and stakeholders? Yes, we are coordinating with the Wyoming Game and Fish Department, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, and the USDA Forest Service.

    Can a qualified volunteer take (shoot) more than one mountain goat in the performance of their duty? Yes, this is a culling operation with the goal of eradicating non-native mountain goats within the boundaries of the park. Qualified volunteers may lethally remove as many non-native mountain goats as is reasonable for their given situation and should make a reasonable effort to care for and remove the edible portions from the animals they take.

    Could non-native mountain goat carcasses be left on the landscape by qualified volunteers? Volunteers should make reasonable efforts to retrieve the edible portions of the animals they take, as long as the terrain is reasonable and allows safe access to the animal.

    Who can apply to be a qualified volunteer? Applicants must be United States citizens and at least 18 years of age. Qualified volunteers may not have active warrants, past wildlife violations, or violations associated with the Elk Reduction Program. Volunteers must certify that they are physically fit and able to hike and operate in management zones above tree line at altitude and travel in remote and steep mountainous terrain. Volunteers must also pass a mandatory firearm proficiency evaluation (three of five shots in an eight-inch target at 200 yards).

    Do volunteers need to be in good physical condition? In order to safely and successfully participate in this program, volunteers must have a high level of physical fitness; volunteers may need to hike up to 20 miles per day at altitude in extremely rough mountainous terrain under a variety of weather conditions (i.e., wind, rain, snow, and below freezing temperatures). Elevations in the park range from 6,320’ to 13,775’ and volunteers can expect to pursue most non-native mountain goats in 3rd through 5th class terrain at elevations ranging from 9,000’ to 12,500’.

    Will qualified volunteers be provided training prior to going into the field for operations? Yes, all volunteers will be required to show proficiency with a firearm (if shooting), and will receive training in bear spray deployment, backcountry tracking, radio protocols, species identification, and potentially, disease sample collection.

    Are the qualified volunteers considered employees of the National Park Service? Yes.

    Do I need a valid hunting license to participate? No, a qualified volunteer (shooter) needs proof of a Certificate of Competency and Safety in the Use and Handling of Firearms otherwise known as a state-issued hunter safety card (regardless of age or state). Law enforcement and military exemptions to hunter safety cards will not be accepted.

    What will happen to the meat brought out of the field by qualified volunteers? Per the Dingell Act, the meat may be donated or distributed to Indian Tribes, qualified volunteers, food banks, and other organizations that work to address hunger, in accordance with applicable health guidelines. Successful volunteers will be eligible to keep the meat equivalent of one goat per volunteer or they may choose to donate the meat. Meat shall be possessed through a Wyoming Game and Fish donation coupon.

    Does a harvested mountain goat need to be tested for chronic wasting disease (CWD)? No, only deer, moose, and elk can contract CWD. Bovids are the “horned” members of the even toed ungulate order (hoofed animals). Deer are “antlered” even toed ungulates.

    Can a volunteer keep the cape, head, or horns? No, the qualified volunteers are only eligible to receive a meat donation through a Wyoming Game and Fish Department donation coupon. The cape and horns must be left at the site of kill. However, members of Indian Tribes who participate as qualified volunteers may be eligible to keep additional portions of the mountain goat.

    Will this program require temporary closures to areas of the park? It is possible that specific areas of the park will need to be temporarily closed during non-native mountain goat management activities if park staff determine this is necessary for public safety. Closures of specific areas could last for several hours, days, or for the duration of the management activities.

    What is the projected time frame for utilizing qualified volunteers in 2020? Project operations will begin on September 14, and will run through November 13, 2020 (weather permitting).

    What is the group size? Minimum group size is two and the maximum size is six. The team leader must be an identified shooter and may be assisted by 1-5 shooting or non-shooting helpers. Complete information for all intended shooters must be provided at the time of application.

    Can I participate as a solo qualified volunteer? No. If an applicant is accepted, and members of his/her group later drop out and their group size decreases below two, the applicant will not be able to participate.

    Are qualified volunteers required to carry bear spray? Yes, a minimum size of 7.9 oz, EPA registered, readily accessible, and NON-expired bear spray must be carried by each volunteer. This will be provided by the NPS.

    What else will the NPS provide to the qualified volunteers? Radio, satellite communication device, and GPS tracking device for use while conducting operations. Applicants are accountable for all equipment provided and must return the equipment at the conclusion of their operation.

    How will successful qualified volunteers and others legally transport goat meat after leaving the park and crossing state lines? A Wyoming Game and Fish Department donation coupon will be issued.

    How will qualified volunteers be identified in the field? Each volunteer will be issued an NPS volunteer uniform item which must be worn while actively participating in non-native mountain goat removal operations.

    What caliber of weapons must be used by the qualified volunteer? Volunteers must use a rifle of a minimum caliber .25 bottlenecked ammunition with at least a 100-grain bullet.

    What type of ammunition will be used for this program? Qualified volunteers must use non-lead ammunition.

    Can a qualified volunteer use a silencer on their rifle? Yes, silencers are encouraged but not required, in accordance with federal laws on silencer possession and use.

    Will shooters need to show proficiency in marksmanship? If applying as a shooter, you will be required to demonstrate your skill during the training day by putting three of five shots, using the ammunition and rifle that you will use in the field, in an 8” target from 200 yards. Failure to do so will be cause for termination of an individual from the program.

    What time frame are qualified volunteers applying for? Volunteer groups will be assigned to one of eight culling periods: 9/14-19, 9/22-27, 9/30 -10/5, 10/8-13, 10/16-21, 10/24-29, 11/1-6 and 11/10-15, weather permitting. Each session starts with a mandatory training day, followed by up to five days in the field. You may not need to participate all six days. However, you may not participate past the end date of your session.

    May qualified volunteers apply for multiple operational periods? Volunteers will be asked to indicate which dates they are available, and preferences for sessions if they are available for more than one. Weather and other conditions may cause the cancellation of a session. If a team is only available for one week they must select that week for all four preferences.

    Can qualified volunteers pick what area they will be culling in? Volunteers will select their management zones during the application process in order of preference. Park management will assign teams to management zones that will maximize potential success, support management priorities, and avoid wildlife or visitor use conflicts. All areas are difficult to access, and most are extremely challenging. Potential applicants should review the area maps and descriptions at the bottom of this page before choosing to apply.

    Will volunteer teams need a backcountry permit for overnight stays in the management zone they are assigned? No. Teams will be provided guidance based on their specific circumstance on the best location to camp. All backcountry camping regulations (no fires, food storage, party size, camping in designated areas, etc.) will be in effect.

    Can volunteers use stock while participating as a qualified volunteer? Only zones 1 and 6 are conducive to stock-supported camping and subsequent removal effort, thus volunteers reliant on stock will be limited in their options to participate in non-native mountain goat removal. Please review stock regulations if you intend to utilize this resource. In particular, 1) stock use is limited to park-maintained trails and may not leave the trails for any purpose to include scouting and goat retrieval; 2) stock users must provide all certified weed-free feed that is necessary for the entire operation; and 3) grazing on park vegetation is not allowed. Prior to arriving, volunteers should read Grand Teton National Park’s webpage regarding stock-use inside the park.

    How is this culling operation different than the Elk Reduction Program? This culling operation is a management action to eradicate non-native mountain goats in the park as quickly as possible in order to protect the park’s bighorn sheep population. The Elk Reduction Program is used for managing part of the native Jackson elk herd, the largest elk herd in North America. Congress authorized the Elk Reduction Program in 1950 as part of the legislation that expanded the boundaries of Grand Teton National Park. This legislation included a provision to manage the elk population through an annual elk reduction program when necessary.

    How will qualified volunteers be selected? All applications for a specific operational period will be considered through a random draw. For each operational period 1-10 teams will be selected to participate in specific management zones. Teams that are drawn will be notified by email and phone if selected. Teams that are not selected will be notified by email.

    For more information: e-mail us or call 307-739-3651.

    Contact the Park

    Mailing Address:

    P.O. Box 170
    Moose, WY 83012

    Phone:

    307-739-3399
    Talk to a Ranger? To speak to a Grand Teton National Park ranger call 307–739–3399 for visitor information Monday-Friday during business hours.

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