Amphibians

Tadpoles in shallow water
Canyon tree frog tadpoles are found in most of the streams in the Grand Canyon.

NPS Robb Hannawacker

 

Amphibians are important species that live throughout Grand Canyon National Park. They are predators of many invertebrate and vertebrate species, and are also an important food source for fish, reptiles, mammals, and birds. Amphibians are very sensitive to environmental change, and are some of the first species to go extinct when a habitat is changed. Because of this, studying amphibians can provide important information about the health of the Grand Canyon ecosystem. Across the world, amphibian species are threatened with extinction and declines in population. Some of the largest threats to amphibians are habitat destruction, poisoning by human chemicals, and introduced species. The protected habitat of the Grand Canyon is an important refuge for these fragile species, where they can continue to exist and thrive.

Please observe amphibians from a distance. Amphibians absorb chemicals through their skin, meaning that they can be poisoned by the sunscreen and bug spray on your hands.

 
Canyon Tree Frog
Canyon Tree Frog

NPS K.Kingsley

Canyon Tree Frog
This species is widely-distributed in Arizona outside of the Sonoran and Mohave Deserts.

 
Northern Leopard Frog
Northern Leopard Frog

AZGFD R.Babb

Northern Leopard Frog

One of the most wide ranging frog species, northern leopard frogs were once common in the Grand Canyon, but have undergone major declines and have not been seen in the Canyon in several years.

 
Red-Spotted Toad
Red-Spotted Toad

USFWS Jim Rorabaugh

Red-Spotted Toad
This toad is found from southern Nevada to southwestern Kansas, south to Hidalgo, Mexico, and throughout Baja California.

 
Tiger Salamander
Tiger Salamander

NPS Paul Kister

Tiger Salamander
They are also the most wide-ranging salamander species in North America, living throughout most of the United States, southern Canada, and eastern Mexico.

 
Woodhouse Toad
Woodhouse Toad

NPS Volunteer

Woodhouse Toad
These toads live throughout Arizona except for in the arid, western deserts. They are especially common near the Indian Gardens and Phantom Ranch Campgrounds.
 

Quick Facts

  • 8 species of Amphibians live within the park- 4 toad species, 2 frog species, and 2 salamander species.
  • Most reptiles spend their entire lives on land, but amphibians must spend at least part of their life in the water. For example, frogs and toads begin their lives as tadpoles, which live in pools and springs.
  • No amphibians have scales, and many have a moist skin covered with mucous.
 

More Information

Arizona's Amphibians. Arizona Game and Fish

 
 

Contact the Park

Mailing Address:

PO Box 129
Grand Canyon, AZ 86023

Phone:

(928) 638-7888
This is the main phone number for general park questions.

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