Rock! Pattern! Systems!

Grade 4

This program is full for the 2016-2017 school year.

 
Sea lions bask on an outcropping of pillow basalt.

Suzanne Garcia, NPS

 
Partial world map showing ocean topography.

Portion of the World Ocean Floor Map, 1977. Compiled by Marie Tharp and Bruce Heezen. Painted by Heinrich Berann.
Library of Congress Catalog Record 2010586277, www.loc.gov/item/2010586277

 

Rock! Pattern! Systems! takes young geologists on a dramatic trek to the Point Bonita Lighthouse, the first place in California where scientists produced a detailed geologic map. Through both individual and small group work, students use copies of the first complete world map of the ocean floor to hone their powers of observation and find patterns in seafloor mountain ranges. A close read of a short biography of the mapmakers offers context for the 3 decade struggle to produce and publish a map that changed how we think about land and sea. At Point Bonita, students investigate seafloor rocks along the trail and pose information questions and questions for deeper meaning as they construct their own understanding of the importance of accurate data in creating new scientific knowledge. .

Rock! Pattern! Systems! uses the Understanding by Design framework, and aligns with the Next Generation Science Standards and Common Core Standards.

Please click here for the Understanding by Design grid.

Please click here for the screen reader compatible Understanding by Design grid

Please click here for the curriculum for Rock! Pattern! Systems!

Please click here for the screen reader compatible curriculum for Rock! Pattern! Systems!

Program Description

Rock! Pattern! Systems! is framed by the Essential Question – “How can maps change the way we think about land and sea?”

Rock! Pattern! Systems! is structured in three parts:

Classroom preparation – lessons delivered by the teacher and NPS staff with resources provided by the park

Field session – the park experience in which students investigate seafloor rocks, engage in scientific inquiry, and discuss the challenges of the scientific process

Classroom Assessment - opportunities for students to demonstrate what they have learned through writing stories or illustrated poems based on evidence gleaned from classroom activities and the field visit to Point Bonita

Last updated: November 4, 2016

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Golden Gate National Recreation Area
Building 201, Fort Mason

San Francisco, CA 94123-0022

Phone:

(415) 561-4700
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