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When I Grow Up, I'm Going To Be A...(Round 1)

National parks are bustling with different kinds of life, from the tiniest of creatures to the largest on the planet. Follow these basic safety tips for watching wildlife in parks and Leave No Trace principles to keep their habitat healthy for future generations of life in parks.

Can you identify what species each of these youths found in national parks grow up to be? Slide the arrows on each image to the left or right to see if you guessed correctly. Use the dropdown menus to learn more about each one.

When I grow up, I'm going to be a...
A photo of a mountain lion cub next to a photo of a full-grown mountain lion Photo of a full-grown mountain lion next to a question mark
NPS
NPS
...a full-grown mountain lion. Kittens are about the size of house cats, but not for long. They can grow to 7 to 8 feet long from their noses to the tips of their tails as adults! Litters of kittens usually stay with their mother and siblings until old enough to venture out on their own for a solitary life from other mountain lions.



When I grow up, I'm going to be a...
A photo of a juvenile bald eagle next to a photo of a full-grown bald eagle A photo of a bald eagle next to a question mark
NPS (left), NPS / Daniel Peterson (right)
NPS / Daniel Peterson
...a full-grown bald eagle. Juvenile bald eagles are transitioning from furry gray chicks to their iconic appearance matching their scientific name, which translates to "a white-headed sea eagle." These eaglets have among the fastest growth rates of North American birds and are sometimes confused for other adult birds of prey.



When I grow up, I'm going to be a...
A photo of turtle eggs in the sand next to a photo of a full-grown Kemps ridley turtle A photo of a full-grown Kemps ridley turtle next to a question mark
NPS
NPS
...a sea turtle. Specifically a Kemp's ridley sea turtle, one of the most endangered species of sea turtles. Kemp's ridley sea turtles dig nests on the beach to lay their eggs. Hatchlings head straight to the ocean after exiting their shells. Most females return to the same beach when they are much older and larger to lay eggs each year.



When I grow up, I'm going to be a...
A photo of a moose calf next to a photo of a full-grown moose bull A photo of a full-grown moose bull next to a question mark
NPS / Mike Vogel (left), NPS / Kent Miller (right)
NPS / Kent Miller
...a full-grown moose. Moose are the largest members of the deer family. Calves grow up to be bulls (males) that can weight 900-1400 pounds or cows (females) that can weigh 700-1100 pounds. Bulls grow their signature antlers each spring and shed them in early winter.



When I grow up, I'm going to be a...
A photo of a group of Junior Rangers getting sworn in next to a photo of two park rangers A photo of two park rangers next to a question mark
NPS (left), NPS / Michael Liang (right)
NPS / Michael Liang
...a park ranger! Kids of all ages can become Junior Rangers at almost all of the national parks across the country. Adults can become rangers in many career fields, volunteer, or be stewards by enjoying national parks and using Leave No Trace practices when visiting.



Last updated: April 6, 2020