• View of Grand Canyon National Park at sunset from the South Rim

    Grand Canyon

    National Park Arizona

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  • Mostly fair weather conditions are forecast for Monday.

    Strong winds will return on Tuesday ahead of an approaching cold front from the northwest. Dry humidity levels along with breezy winds will continue through the week with stronger winds returning by the weekend. (Source NOAA) More »

Critical Backcountry Updates: Including Trail Closures and Restrictions

Average temperatures, weather information and road conditions can be found on the Weather Conditions page.

Backcountry Status Updates (listed by date posted):

 
 
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Spring / Summer 2014 Backpacking Season
date posted Mar 21, 2014

If you would like to make an advance reservation to camp in the Grand Canyon, we need at least three weeks' notice. If your planned hike is less than three weeks away, come in person to the Backcountry Information Center and request a walk-in permit. Availability of last minute permits is dependent on the season. The South Rim Backcountry Information Center is open year-round. The North Rim office is closed until mid-May.

Spring has arrived at Grand Canyon and in this dry year, all South Rim trails are clear of snow and ice. Access to all dirt backcountry roads to remote trailheads on both canyon rims can range from difficult to impossible depending on recent rain and daytime high temperature. Changing conditions make it impossible to generalize about the condition of specific roads or trails. Hikers considering traveling dirt roads to remote trailheads should contact the North Kaibab Ranger District of the Kaibab National Forest at 928-643-7395, the Tusayan Ranger District of the Kaibab National Forest on the South Rim at 928-635-4061, or the Backcountry Information Center for current conditions.

March: Bright Angel and Indian Garden Campgrounds are full the last three weeks.

April: Spring is a delightful time of year for overnight hiking, and consequently most corridor and threshold use areas are at capacity.

May: Corridor campgrounds are full. Hiking outside the Corridor becomes inherently more risky, especially later in the month as temperatures start to climb above 100°F (38°C) at the Colorado River.

June, July, and August: Hiking outside the Corridor is not recommended due to extreme heat.

WARNING FOR JUNE, JULY, AND AUGUST: Elevated hiking risk due to extreme summer heat. High temperatures at the bottom of the canyon in the shade range from 100°F to 115°F (35°C - 42°C). Low temperatures at the bottom of the canyon range from 70°F to 80°F (20°C - 25°C). Hikers entering the canyon in the middle of summer do so at their own risk. Keep hikes short and rest in the shade between the hours of 10 am and 4 pm. Better yet, start hikes early and plan on reaching your destination or exiting the canyon no later than 10 am. Flash flood and lightning risks remain elevated until the end of the monsoon season, usually in early September. Hike Smart! Visit www.nps.gov/grca/planyourvisit/hike-smart.htm for more info.

Options for hikers who are unable to obtain a backcountry permit in advance:

  • Get a permit at the park. A limited number of last minute walk-up permits are available for Corridor Campgrounds (Indian Garden, Bright Angel, and Cottonwood Campgrounds) at the Backcountry Information Center. These permits are issued in person only, are for one or two consecutive nights, and cannot be purchased more than one day prior to the start of a hike. Review information on our website (www.nps.gov/grca/planyourvisit/backcountry.htm) or contact us at (928) 638-7875 between 1 pm and 5 pm Monday through Friday, or email us (more info)
  • Day Hike: No permit needed to day hike. Weather and trail conditions are variable and can change dramatically from one hour to the next. Plan Ahead and Prepare. (more info)

North Rim (Kaibab Plateau / Highway 67 / North Kaibab Trailhead): The North Rim of Grand Canyon National Park is closed to vehicles for the winter season until May 15. The park's group campsite and a yurt can be reserved until April 15. You must obtain your backcountry permit prior to arrival. Backcountry permits for North Rim winter hikes can be obtained from the South Rim Backcountry Information Center, at Pipe Springs National Monument, or at the BLM Interagency Visitor Center in St. George, Utah. Locations near the 8,000 foot level such as Pt. Sublime, high elevation access to Nankoweap, and the North Bass Trailhead will not be accessible until road beds have dried and downed trees have been removed, often in late May, but possibly as late as mid-June.

 

Road Conditions for Remote Trailheads
date posted Mar 21, 2014

After heavy summer rain (July and August) or winter snow (December through March), expect impassable backcountry roads. If clear skies abound after the rain or snow, then it is often just a matter of days until the sun dries everything out. Sometimes, heavy rain or melting snow can lead to flooding, which can cause erosion of the roadbed and can delay access. Snow accumulations have been very low in 2013/2014, so lower elevation dirt roads may be accessible.

Other considerations for visitors travelling on remote backcountry roads include high clearance, such as may be needed on Forest Road 328 to South Bass Trailhead (limestone ledges) and on the final approach to Toroweap overlook (sandstone knobs and ledges).

Finally, consider elevation of the road that you will be travelling on, especially during the winter months. Roads in the 6,500 to 8,000 foot range may be impassable due to a snowpack, where lower elevations roads (below 6,000 feet) will see deteriorated road conditions due to rain.

Always check road conditions with the Backcountry Information Center before heading out to remote trailheads, tell someone where you are going and when you will be back, and be adaptable and prepared for the worst. High clearance, four-wheel drive is usually recommended for roads to remote trailheads.

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It is not uncommon for trees to fall and block access to remote trailheads. When you encounter a road blocked by fallen trees, what should you do?

  • Report the location and diameter of the tree to Grand Canyon park dispatch (928-638-7805) as soon as possible. The park will assign staff to clear the road.
  • If an appropriate (not blocking the road and not damaging vegetation) place to park is available, park your vehicle and continue to the trailhead on foot.
  • Do not drive off-road attempting to bypass the obstacle, doing so can cause resource damage.
 

Trails Update
date posted Mar 20, 2014

South Rim trails are mostly snow and ice free. On the Tanner Trail there are still a couple of small icy patches in the Kaibab and Toroweap.

North Kaibab Trail: A small section of the North Kaibab Trail below Supai Tunnel was damaged in September 2013 due to heavy rain. The North Kaibab Trail is currently open to hikers but not to stock below Supai Tunnel. Hikers should use caution. The damaged section is very narrow, but passable. The trail crew has installed a handline to assist hikers when crossing the narrow section. The handline stretches across the length of the washout, and then some (about 15 to 16 feet). The Grand Canyon Trail Crew hopes to have the damaged section repaired by mid-May 2014.

Hikers without a permit can stop by the Backcountry Information Center to request a last minute permit. Last minute permits and waitlist numbers are issued by the Backcountry Information Center, located inside the park. The South Rim Backcountry Information Center is open daily, year round, for walk-in visitors from 8 am to noon and 1-5 pm Mountain Standard Time. The North Rim Backcountry Information Center is open daily from mid-May to October 31 for walk-in visitors from 8 am to noon and 1-5 pm Mountain Standard Time.

 

Report from the North Rim
date posted Dec 5, 2013

The North Rim of Grand Canyon National Park is closed for the season. It will reopen mid-May 2014.

The North Rim's group campsite and a yurt can be reserved throughout the winter months. You must obtain your backcountry permit prior to arrival. The North Rim is only accessible via inner canyon trails from the South Rim or by cross-country skiing and snowshoeing from Jacob Lake (a 45 mile trip).

The North Rim will open for the summer season mid-May 2014 (usually May 15th). Locations near the 8,000 foot level such as Pt. Sublime, high elevation access to Nankoweap, and the North Bass Trailhead will not be accessible until road beds have dried and downed trees have been removed, often in late May, but possibly as late as mid-June.

 

North Rim Yurt
date posted Dec 5, 2013

The North Rim yurt is open for reservation.

The North Rim yurt, placed near the North Kaibab Trailhead, can be reserved from December 1 to April 15. The yurt accommodates six people and is outfitted with a table, chairs, and wood-burning stove. A portable toilet is nearby. Required permits are available through the Backcountry Information Center. For more information see www.nps/gov/grca/planyourvisit/winter-recreation.htm

 

Drinking Water in the Cross-Canyon Corridor
date posted Nov 20, 2013

Purified drinking water is usually available year-round at Bright Angel and Indian Garden Campgrounds and at Bright Angel and South Kaibab trailheads.

Grand Canyon's water supply comes from Roaring Springs, a natural spring located approximately 3,500 feet below the North Rim. Water is delivered via an aging pipeline that suffers multiple breaks a year. When the pipeline breaks, water stops flowing to the North and South Rims and sites along the way. Although large storage tanks provide ample water to rim locations, while the pipeline is being repaired water may or may not be available below the rim in the cross-canyon Corridor. Please remember, when hiking below the rim a method to treat water must always be part of your hiking gear.

The list below shows if water has been turned on or off for the season (if the pipeline is undergoing repairs water may be off temporarily)

  • North Kaibab Trailhead: water turned OFF
  • Supai Tunnel: water turned OFF
  • Roaring Springs Day Use Area: water turned OFF
  • Pumphouse Rest Area: ON year-round
  • Cottonwood Campground: water turned OFF
  • Bright Angel Campground: ON year-round
  • Plateau Point: water turned OFF
  • Indian Garden: ON year-round
  • Bright Angel Trail, Three-Mile Resthouse: water turned OFF
  • Bright Angel Trail, Mile-and-a-Half Resthouse: water turned OFF
  • Bright Angel Trailhead: ON year-round
  • South Kaibab Trailhead: ON year-round

Seasonal water stations are usually turned off for the winter sometime between Oct 10th and 30th dependent on location and associated temperatures.

Water available (year-round) on the South Rim at the Backcountry Information Center in the lobby. Water available (year-round) on the North Rim outside the Backcountry Information Center. Additional water bottle filling stations can be found on the Go "Green" and Refill Your Water Bottles web page.

Plan Ahead and Prepare: A backup method to treat water, should the pipeline break, must always be included as part of your hiking gear. Backcountry hikers should always carry extra water.

 

Hiking Podcast Updated
date posted Jul 24, 2013

The Backcountry Information Center has updated the Hiking Podcast. The most recent podcast covers some tips for hiking in the extreme heat of the inner canyon; tips that can mean the difference between an enjoyable hike and a potentially fatal one. Visit the Grand Canyon Podcast Directory (www.nps.gov/grca/photosmultimedia/podcasts.htm) for more information or to subscribe. Additionally the update can be heard on the Backcountry Audiocast page (www.nps.gov/grca/photosmultimedia/bc_audiocasts.htm). A transcript of the update is posted on the Backcountry Audiocast page.

 

Be Aware of Lightning Danger
date posted Jul 22, 2013

Summer storms in the southwest are often accompanied by potentially deadly lightning. Visitors walking and hiking in the park are reminded that if they can hear thunder, they should consider ending outdoor activities. If the sound of thunder follows a lightning flash within 30 seconds, seek shelter inside a building or vehicle. If this is not possible, move well away from high points such as ridges and the edge of the canyon. Do not seek shelter beneath tall trees.

For more on how to be "lightning smart" read the Lightning Danger Site Bulletin.

 
Tuweep Road August 2012

Tuweep Road August 2012


Tuweep Update
date posted Jun 26, 2013

Tuweep is at High Clearance REQUIRED, its usual condition. Please see photo for any clearance concerns.

There is a HIGH likelihood for multiple flat tires from sharp rocks. Travel SLOW to mitigate tire damage. Carry multiple spare tires and/or a vehicle air compressor and tire plugs. When available, a tow truck runs $1,000-$2,000+.

When possible, during summer monsoon season travel during the morning hours since storms cycle through in the afternoon and evening.

Be prepared to spend the night in your vehicle in the event you become stuck. Carry sleeping bags, food, and extra water.

Travelers should carry:

  • Extra water, food, and gasoline;
  • Good tires, including at least one usable spare;
  • Parts, tools, and knowledge to handle vehicle and tire repairs including tire plugs and a portable air compressor.

For Tuweeep info visit www.nps.gov/grca/planyourvisit/tuweep.htm

 

Public Health Alert - Rabies
date posted Jun 26, 2013

A fox exhibiting abnormal behavior was euthanized in November 2011 near Phantom Ranch along the Colorado River in Grand Canyon. Earlier that month, another fox collected near Phantom Ranch tested positive for rabies. Rabies is considered a natural wildlife disease and will likely run its course. To reduce your risk of injury or illness from an animal encounter (fox, bat, elk, mountain lion, squirrel) please follow these simple guidelines:

  • educate yourself and your children about proper behavior around animals, especially concerning to animals common to the area you will be visiting
  • don't touch, pick-up, or approach wild animals
  • stay together as a group
  • keep food appropriately stored at all times
  • never feed wildlife
  • wild animals approaching humans is not normal - be aware of your surroundings and keep your distance
  • consider sleeping inside a tent

For more information read the Public Health Rabies Site Bulletin.

 

Drinking Water outside the Cross-Canyon Corridor
date posted Jun 26, 2013

Hikers should make every effort to obtain recent confirmation of water availability and become familiar with routes to the river before starting any hike. Contact the Backcountry Information Center for recent water reports.

Water available (year-round) on the South Rim at the Backcountry Information Center in the lobby and at Hermits Rest (near the other public amenities). Water available (year-round) on the North Rim outside the Backcountry Information Center.

Additional water bottle filling stations can be found on the Go "Green" and Refill Your Water Bottles web page.

 

South Kaibab Trailhead Access
date posted Jun 26, 2013

Hikers must access the South Kaibab Trailhead by shuttle bus. There are two options.

  1. An early morning Hikers' Express goes to the South Kaibab Trailhead from Bright Angel Lodge shuttle bus stop, the Backcountry Information Center, and Grand Canyon Visitor Center daily, year-round. Parking is available at the Backcountry Information Center.
  2. The Kaibab/Rim Route shuttle provides transportation between the Grand Canyon Visitor Center, the Yavapai Geology Museum, the South Kaibab Trailhead, Yaki Point, and rim viewpoints.

Visit the Shuttle Buses page for schedules and more info.

 

Hermit Trailhead Access
date posted Jun 26, 2013

From Mar 1 to Nov 30, Hermit Road is closed to private vehicles. A numerical code is required to open the gate giving access to Hermit Road. Hikers with a valid backcountry permit who are beginning or ending their hike via the Hermit Trail will be permitted to park at the Hermit trailhead. The Backcountry Information Center will provide the gate access code when the backcountry permit is issued.

The Hermits Rest shuttle between South Rim Village and Hermit Rest and the Hermit trailhead is operational Mar. 1 to Nov. 30. The bus runs every 30 minutes between 4:30am and 9:30am, every 15 minutes between 9:30am and sunset, and every 30 minutes between sunset and one hour after sunset. The Hermit Rest Shuttle is free. Visit the Shuttle Buses page for schedules and more info.

Weather dependent, Hermit Road is open to all private vehicles Dec 1 to Feb 28. Be aware that in wintertime inclement weather can cause Hermit Road to close with little notice as storms move through the area. Always check with the Backcountry Information Center regarding the wintertime status of Hermit Road or call 928-638-7496 for updated road conditions.

 

Backcountry Management Plan
date posted Jul 13, 2012

Backcountry Management Plan Summer 2012 Update Newsletter posted online at www.nps.gov/grca/parkmgmt/bmp.htm

Grand Canyon National Park has started work on a Backcountry Management Plan and Environmental Impact Statement. The park's existing Backcountry Management Plan was completed in 1988 and needs to be updated to comply with current National Park Service laws and policies and the park's 1995 General Management Plan.

Development of a revised plan provides an opportunity to look at alternative management strategies for protecting park resources and values while providing for a variety of visitor experiences within the backcountry. Once completed, the revised Backcountry Management Plan will guide management decisions regarding the park's backcountry and wilderness resources into the future.

Learn more about this planning effort at www.parkplanning.nps.gov/grcabmp.

 
 

How to contact the Backcountry Information Center:

The South Rim Backcountry Information Center is open daily for walk-in visitors from 8 am to noon and 1-5 pm Mountain Standard Time. The North Rim Backcountry Information Center is open daily mid-May to October 31 for walk-in visitors from 8 am to noon and 1-5 pm Mountain Standard Time.

Backcountry Information Center staff answer information telephone inquiries at 928-638-7875 between 1 pm and 5 pm Monday through Friday, except on federal holidays. This telephone number is for information only.

Email the Backcountry Information Center

FAX number for permits is 928-638-2125
you can send a fax 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year - HOWEVER the first day of every month we receive many faxes and the number may be busy

Mailing address is:
Grand Canyon National Park
Permits Office
1824 S. Thomson St., Suite 201
Flagstaff AZ, 86001

Backcountry Permit Request Form (PDF file) NOTE: This is a printable form only. You must print the form, fill it out, and then fax/mail it directly to the Backcountry Information Center. We recommend you read the seasonal update before submitting your permit request.

PDF Form Issues? If you are using a web browser to view and use our PDF forms, you may experience issues where the PDF does not function correctly. Some web browsers do not automatically open PDFs using the Acrobat Reader application. Using a different PDF viewer in a web browser can cause the form to malfunction.To fix issues with our PDF forms you have two options. 1. You can select the Acrobat Reader plug-in for your browser's default application for viewing PDFs. Or 2. You can right click and save the PDF document to your desktop and then open it with the Adobe Reader application. Get the newest version of the free Adobe Reader.

Trip Planner (2mb PDF file): The information in this newspaper can assist you in obtaining a backcountry use permit.

Video: Hiking Grand Canyon, Prepare for Backpacking. This video is designed to help you plan for and enjoy your hike into the canyon's harsh, yet fragile, environment.

Video: Leave No Trace. All Grand Canyon backcountry users are asked to follow Leave No Trace principles. The goal is to have minimum human impact on the canyon as a result of your trip.

Hike Smart: Be sure and listen to the Hike Smart Podcasts! (transcripts available)

The Grand Canyon Association sells maps and guides on hiking in Grand Canyon National Park.

 

Did You Know?

CCC STRINGS THE INNER-CANYON TELEPHONE LINE

In November of 1934, the Grand Canyon Civilian Conservation Corps began working on a trans-canyon telephone line. Starting at Indian Garden, they progressed downward to the Colorado River. It was necessary to complete this portion of the line first before the onset of extreme summer heat. More...