• Camarasus skull in the cliff face, rafters on the Green River, McKee Springs petroglyphs

    Dinosaur

    National Monument CO,UT

Dinosaur National Monument Receives National Park Foundation Grant to Preserve Dinosaur Quarry

 A National Park Foundation Grant will help preserve these Camarasaurus fossils and the rest of the nearly 1,500 bones in the dinosaur quarry at Dinosaur National Monument.
A National Park Foundation Grant will help preserve these Camarasaurus fossils and the rest of the nearly 1,500 bones in the dinosaur quarry at Dinosaur National Monument.
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News Release Date: February 2, 2012
Contact: Dan Chure, Park Paleontologist, (435) 781-7703

DINOSAUR, CO - The National Park Foundation, the official charity of America's national parks, is proud to award a grant to Dinosaur National Monument. The funds will launch a program to develop long-term monitoring and preservation plan for 150 million-year-old dinosaur fossil quarry. The grant is part of the National Park Foundation's Impact Grant program that gives parks critical financial support needed to transform innovative, yet underfunded ideas, into successful in-park programs and initiatives.

"Preserving fossils in-place, as at Dinosaur, presents many challenges not experienced in a traditional museum setting," said Superintendent Mary Risser. "With the new Quarry Exhibit Hall opened, this is an opportune time to begin repairing existing cracks and damaged bones, documenting the current conditions, and establishing a system to monitor changes. This project will ensure the long-term preservation of the site for which the Monument was established in 1915."

"This project is a collaborative effort between the National Park Service and the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology," said Paleontologist Dan Chure. "The Carnegie Quarry and its fossils at Dinosaur are one of our most important windows onto the world of the Late Jurassic. Bringing together the diverse skills and knowledge of paleontologists, geologists, and museum specialists to tackle the conservation and monitoring issues at the site will preserve the bones for future generations of visitors and scientists."

"With these strategic grants, we have been able to positively impact hundreds of national parks across the country," said Neil Mulholland, President and CEO of the National Park Foundation. "This unique program helps parks enhance the visitor experience, engage more people, and ultimately build a stronger community of park enthusiasts who share an appreciation and commitment to protecting America's Best Idea - their national parks."

The National Park Foundation, in partnership with ARAMARK through the Yawkey Foundation, The Fernandez Pave the Way Foundation, and The HISTORY Channel, awarded Impact Grant grants totaling more than $500,000 to 62 national parks across the country. A full list of grantees is available on the National Park Foundation website.

About the National Park Foundation You are the owner of 84 million acres of the world's most treasured memorials, landscapes, ecosystems, and historic sites -- all protected in America's nearly 400 national parks. Chartered by Congress, the National Park Foundation is the official charity of America's national parks. We work hand in hand with the National Park Service to connect you and all Americans to the parks, and to make sure that they are preserved for the generations who will follow. Join us in supporting your national parks -- this is your land. www.nationalparks.org.

Join us - This is Your Land. www.nationalparks.org
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For more information about Dinosaur National Monument, call us at (435) 781-7700. You can also find us on facebook or follow DinosaurNPS on twitter.

Did You Know?

Picture overlooking river canyon.

Dinosaur National Monument is as famous for its dramatic canyon scenery as it is for its dinosaur fossils.