• Kendall Hills in summer bloom by Jeffrey Gibson

    Cuyahoga Valley

    National Park Ohio

There are park alerts in effect.
show Alerts »
  • Towpath Trail Closure

    Towpath Trail is closed from Mustill Store to Memorial Parkway for riverbank reinforcement. Detours posted. Closure will last 1 - 4 weeks into August. More »

  • Other Closures

    Valley Bridle Trail south of SR 303, across from golf course, is collapsed by river. Hard closure. Plateau Trail Bridge, north of Valley Picnic Area is closed. No detours. Plateau & Oak Hill trails are open. More »

  • Riverview Road Repaving

    Riverview Rd is being repaved from the Cuyahoga-Summit Cty line to Peninsula through Mon, 9/15. Road is open but there are still delays due to construction. Allow extra time. More »

Environmental Factors

Ripples form where the shallow waters of the Cuyahoga River flow over rocks.

Water quality in the Cuyahoga River is a primary concern.

Cuyahoga Valley National Park’s proximity to large urban areas, long history of use, and high visitation make it vulnerable to a variety of environmental concerns. More than two million people live within a short drive of the park, and the traffic, nearby development, and associated pollution can affect park resources.


Water quality in the park’s rivers and streams varies from good to poor. The Cuyahoga River, although much improved from its days as the “river that burned,” is still not clean enough for recreational activities. Air pollution in northeast Ohio, especially unsafe amounts of ground level ozone, can become an issue on hot, hazy summer days. Click here to read more on the water quality of the Cuyahoga River.

The Cuyahoga Valley has a long history of human habitation and use. It is, therefore, no surprise that disturbed lands are common in the park. Lands now within the park had many different uses in the past, including conventional agriculture; mining of topsoil, sand, and gravel; quarries; dumps; industry; and residential development. The park has often initiated actions to restore degraded areas to a more natural state when natural succession processes are insufficient. Many of these areas are now in various stages of succession, giving visitors the opportunity to see butterflies, birds, and other animals taking advantage of plentiful food and shelter.

Nonnative species are another threat to the park’s natural and scenic resources. Frequent disturbance probably contributed to the park’s approximately 186 exotic plant species, ten of which are considered invasive and a threat to native plant species. The park is working to inventory, monitor, and control invasive plants. Gypsy moths, an exotic insect species from Europe, defoliated over 4,000 acres of forest in 1999. The park has since implemented a suppression program to help minimize and mitigate further moth defoliation effects.

Park staff, volunteers, university researchers, local organizations, and other agencies help monitor these and other environmental concerns to identify problems, establish trends, and assist in management decisions.

Did You Know?

Image of Civilian Conservation Corps statue outside Happy Days Visitor Center.

During the Great Depression, the "boys of Company 567" of the Civilian Conservation Corps helped shape the landscape that would later become Cuyahoga Valley National Park by constructing buildings, playfields, and a lake, as well as planting over 100 acres of trees.