What is the National Register of Historic Places?

The National Register of Historic Places is the official list of the Nation's historic places worthy of preservation. Authorized by the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, the National Park Service's National Register of Historic Places is part of a national program to coordinate and support public and private efforts to identify, evaluate, and protect America's historic and archeological resources.
Streetview of commercial district with street and storefronts
Downtown Plainfield Historic District

Courtesy of the Illinois State Historic Preservation Office

What We Do

  • Review nominations submitted by states, tribes, and other federal agencies and list eligible properties in the National Register
  • Offer guidance on evaluating, documenting, and listing different types of historic places through the National Register Bulletin series and other publications
  • Help qualified historic properties receive preservation benefits and incentives

Quicklinks

Large four-story nineteen bay, hip-roof building with a flat-roof central projecting pavilion. A copper-domed cupola is located above the building's central block.
Coatesville Veterans Administration Hospital Historic District

Photograph courtesy of Veterans Administration

Fast Facts

  • The more than 93,000 properties listed in the National Register represent 1.8 million contributing resources - buildings, sites, districts, structures, and objects
  • Almost every county in the United States has at least one place listed in the National Register
  • Listing in the National Register is the first step towards eligibility for National Park Service-administered federal preservation tax credits that have leveraged more than $45 billion in private investment and National Park Service grant programs like Save America's Treasures and Preserve America.

Last updated: October 26, 2018