People: 1835

William Dane Phelps
William Dane Phelps

This group includes people who were part of the Lone Woman's community and were taken from San Nicolas Island to San Pedro in 1835. It also includes some of the nonnative people who were in contact with the Nicoleños during that time.

Nicoleños

Black Hawk
A California Indian who lived at San Pedro near Los Angeles, Black Hawk was given this name by the crew of the ship Alert. According to George Nidever and William Dane Phelps, Black Hawk came from San Nicolas Island when the islanders were brought to the mainland in 1835.

Juana
In her twenties, this Island Indian woman was baptized as Juana at the Los Angeles Plaza Church in March 1836.

María Aleja
When she was about 45 years old, this Island Indian was baptized as María Aleja at the Los Angeles Plaza Church in July 1836. She is highly likely to be one of the San Nicolas Island natives who sailed from the island to Los Angeles in 1835.

María Luciana
As a newborn, this Indian girl was baptized María Luciana at the Los Angeles Plaza Church in May 1836.

María Magdalena
A San Nicolas Island native who may have been removed to San Pedro on the schooner Peor es Nada, this woman was about 22 years old when she was baptized at the Los Angeles Plaza Church as María Magdalena in April 1836.

Tomás Guadalupe
The youngest of the Nicoleños who may have arrived in San Pedro on the schooner Peor es Nada, this boy was about five years old and was baptized as Tomás Guadalupe in the Los Angeles Plaza Church in December 1835.

Others who were, or were likely to have been, in contact with the Nicoleños

Father Jean Augustus Alexis Bachelot
At the time that the Peor es Nada arrived from San Nicolas Island carrying the Nicoleños to San Pedro, Father Bachelot was in charge of both Mission San Gabriel and the Los Angeles Plaza Church.

Father Pedro Cabot
Franciscan priest Pedro Cabot baptized a young Nicoleña, giving her the name María Magdalena in Los Angeles in 1836.

Lewis T. Burton
Lewis Burton may have sailed with Sparks on the Peor es Nada in 1835 when the Nicoleños were taken from San Nicolas Island and brought to San Pedro.

Job F. Dye
Job Dye may have been on the Peor es Nada in 1835 when the Nicoleños were removed from San Nicolas Island and taken to San Pedro.

José Joaquin Gomez
José Joaquin Gomez owned the 20½-ton schooner Peor es Nada, which Isaac Sparks chartered to hunt sea otters along the California coastin 1834–1835.

Charles Hubbard
A German who became a Mexican citizen, Charles Hubbard was captain of the ship Peor es Nada, chartered by Isaac Sparks for sea otter hunting. Hubbard may have taken the ship to San Nicolas Island in 1835 and returned to San Pedro with the Nicoleños.

William Dane Phelps
US sea captain and master of the ship Alert, William Dane Phelps traveled and traded along the California coast from 1840–1842. Phelps kept a journal and recorded details of the removal of the Nicoleños from San Nicolas Island that he had learned from another sea captain.

Thomas Robbins
Thomas Robbins told William Dane Phelps that he visited San Nicolas Island and took two women from the island to San Pedro. He also told Phelps that one Nicoleña female was left behind on the island.

Isaac J. Sparks
Isaac Sparks is known for sailing to San Nicolas Island in 1835 and returning to San Pedro with a group of islanders, leaving the Lone Woman behind.

Isaac Williams
Secondary accounts claim Isaac Williams sailed to San Nicolas Island in 1835 when the islanders were removed and taken to San Pedro.

Last updated: November 17, 2018