Superintendent's Compendium

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a large wooden sign on stone footings. sign states Prince William Forest Park
A wooden sign marks the entrance to the park

NPS photo C.Lynch



Superintendent’s Compendium
of Designations, Closures, Permit Requirements and Other Restrictions Imposed Under Discretionary Authority

2019

Under the National Park Service’s jurisdiction, Prince William Forest Park establishes the regulations to properly manage, protect and govern the park’s public use. Title 54, United States Code, Subtitle I, Division A, Chapter 1001 authorizes these regulations in Title 36, Code of Federal Regulations, Chapter 1, Parts 1-7.

The written determinations that Section 1.5(c) requires for the Superintendent’s discretionary authority appear in this document in italicized print.


Original Signature on file, dated 2/25/2019
Approved By: Superintendent Tanya M. Gossett


Original Signature on file, dated 2/25/2019
Recommended By: Chief Ranger Cynthia Sirk-Fear

Table of Contents

Introduction


A. What is the Compendium?
B. What laws and policies allow the Superintendent to develop this Compendium?
C. Does this compendium comply with applicable Federal law and requirements?
D. How are the requirements of the Superintendent’s Compendium developed?
E. Where does the Compendium Apply?
F. Who enforces this Compendium?
G. Is there a penalty for not adhering to the requirements found in this Compendium?

Regulations

Part 1 GENERAL PROVISIONS


CLOSURES AND PUBLIC USE LIMITS
SCIENTIFIC PERMITS

Part 2 GENERAL REGULATIONS


PRESERVATION OF NATURAL, CULTURAL AND ARCHEOLOGICAL RESOURCES
FIREWOOD
PLANT COLLECTION
FISHING
WEAPONS, TRAPS, AND NETS
CAMPING AND FOOD STORAGE
OAK RIDGE CAMPGROUND
TURKEY RUN GROUP CAMPGROUND
CHOPAWAMSIC BACKCOUNTRY AREA
CABIN CAMPS
PRINCE WILLIAM FOREST RV CAMPGROUND
PICNICKING
FIRES
SANITATION AND REFUSE
PETS
HORSES AND PACK ANIMALS
WINTER ACTIVITIES
SKATING, SKATEBOARDS, AND SIMILAR DEVICES PROPERTY
SMOKING
PROPERTY
RECREATION FEES
ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES AND CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES
MEMORIALIZATION

PART 4 VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC SAFETY


TRAVEL ON PARK ROADS AND ROUTES
VEHICLE LOAD WEIGHT AND SIZE LIMITS
SPEED LIMITS
BICYCLES

 

Introduction

A. What is the Superintendent’s Compendium?


The Prince William Forest Park Superintendent’s Compendium summarizes park specific rules implemented under the Park Superintendent’s discretionary authority. It is public notice that gives the public a chance to comment, identifies areas closed for public use, provides a list of activities requiring either a special use permit or reservation, and elaborates on those public use and resource protection regulations regarding the specific administration of the park. It does not contain those regulations found in Title 36 Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.) and other United States Codes (U.S.C.) and C.F.R. Titles, which are enforced without further elaboration at the park level.

36 C.F.R. Parts 1-7 regulations are the National Park Service’s (NPS) basic mechanism to preserve and protect the park’s natural and cultural resources and to protect visitors and property in the park. Parts 1 through 6 are general regulations applicable to all National Park System areas and Part 7 contains special regulations specific to individual parks. Each part has many sections and subsections articulating specific provisions. Certain Part 1-7 sections and subsections grant the Superintendent discretionary authority to develop local rules respond to a specific park’s resource or activity, park plan, program, the general public’s special needs or a combination of these.

This compendium should be used with 36 C.F.R. Sections 1-7 to understand more fully the regulations governing all National Park System areas’ use and enjoyment.

B. What laws and policies allow the Superintendent to develop this Compendium?


54 U.S.C. Subtitle I, Division A, Ch. 1001, § 100101(a) (National Park Service Organic Act of 1916, as amended) grants the NPS broad statutory authority in to “... regulate the use of the National Park System by means and measures that conform to the fundamental purpose of the System units, which purpose is to conserve the scenery, natural and historic objects, and wildlife in the System units and to provide for the enjoyment of the scenery, natural and historic objects, and wildlife in such manner and by such means as will leave them unimpaired for the enjoyment of future generations.”

In 1970, Congress amended the NPS Organic Act to clarify its intentions regarding the NPS’ overall mission. Through the General Authorities Act of 1970 (54 U.S.C. Subtitle I, Division A, Ch. 1001, § 100101 (b)(1), Congress brought all areas the NPS administered into one National Park System and directed the NPS to manage all areas under its administration consistent with the Organic Act of 1916. In 1978, Congress amended the General Authorities Act of 1970 and reasserted System wide the high standard of protection defined in the original Organic Act by stating “Congress reaffirms, declares, and directs that the promotion and regulation of the various System units shall be consistent with and founded in the purpose established by subsection (a), to the common benefit of all people of the United States.” 54 U.S.C. Subtitle I, Division A, Ch. 1005, § 100501 defines the National Park System as “... any areas of land and water administered by the Secretary, acting through the Director, for park, monument, historic, parkway, recreational, or other purposes.”

36 C.F.R. § 1.7(b) requires the Superintendent to compile in writing all the designations, closures, permit requirements, and other restrictions imposed under discretionary authority. This compilation, called the Superintendent’s Compendium, will be updated annually and made available to the public upon request. Besides the above statutory authority, the Superintendent is also guided by established NPS policy found in the NPS Management Policies (2006). As this Compendium outlines, the NPS’ primary role is to protect and preserve our national natural and cultural resources while providing for the visitors’ enjoyment of these resources and other users, as long as use does not impair specific park resources or overall visitor experience. The appropriateness of any particular visitor use or recreational experience is resource based and will vary from park to park; therefore, a use or activity that is appropriate in one park area may be inappropriate in another.

Each Park Superintendent is directed to analyze overall park use and determine if any particular use is appropriate. Where conflict arises between use and resource protection, where the Superintendent has grounds to believe a resource is or would become impaired, then that Superintendent is obliged to place limitations on public use.

C. Does this Compendium comply with applicable Federal law and requirements?


The Superintendent’s Compendium is not considered a significant rule requiring an Office of Management and Budget review under Executive Order 12866. This Compendium complies with Title 54 United States Code and Title 36 Code of Federal Regulations, Chapter 1, Parts 1-7.

D. How are the requirements of the Superintendent’s Compendium developed?


As outlined above, the NPS has broad authority to determine what uses and activities are appropriate in any particular National Park System area.

The Superintendent’s Compendium requirements are developed with an analysis and decision process for that particular NPS area. The decision criteria used during this process are:
1. Is the use or activity consistent with the National Park Service Organic Act and NPS policy?
2. Is the use or activity consistent and compatible with the park’s enabling legislation, management objectives, and corresponding management plans?
3. Will the use or activity damage or impair the park’s protected natural and cultural resources and other protected values?
4. Will the use or activity disturb or be in conflict with wildlife, vegetation, and environmental protection actions and values?
5. Will the use or activity conflict with or be incompatible with traditional park uses and activities?
6. Will the use or activity compromise employee or public safety?

E. Where does this Compendium apply?


This Compendium’s regulations apply to all persons in federally owned lands and waters boundaries that the NPS administers as part of Prince William Forest Park.

F. Who enforces the requirements of this Compendium?


Only NPS Law Enforcement Park Rangers or a cross designated Law Enforcement Officer can enforce United States Code, C.F.R. Titles, and this Superintendent’s Compendium requirements. However, many federal laws and regulations have similar statutes state and local law. Many Compendium requirements complement existing state and local law and regulations that are also in effect in the park and enforced by state and local law enforcement officers.

G. Is there a penalty for not adhering to the requirements found in this Compendium?


A person who violates any regulations in Title 36 C.F.R. Parts 1-7 or this compendium is subject to a fine as provided by law (18 U.S.C. § 3571) up to $5,000 for individuals and $10,000 for organizations, or by imprisonment not exceeding six months (18 U.S.C. § 3559), or both, and will be adjudged to pay all court costs associated with any court proceedings.
 
the visitor center covered in winter snow
Visitor center covered in snow

NPS photo C.Lynch

36 C.F.R. Part 1–General Provisions

§ 1.5 – Closures and Public Use Limits

Park Grounds and Facilities Hours of Operation:


Unless otherwise designated, all park areas including buildings, roads, trails, and other public use facilities and areas are closed 30 minutes after sunset to 30 minutes before sunrise. Service employees conducting official business, those with a valid scientific research permit, park residents and their invited guests, groups or persons legally camping are exempt, and those with a valid Special Use Permit. After dark, campers must restrict activities to their campgrounds and may use only those park roads and trails that are necessary for access to those campgrounds. All other trail use is prohibited.

Visitor Center


1. The Visitor Center is closed on New Year’s Day, Thanksgiving, and Christmas and at other times as designated by the Superintendent. Hours may be further changed to meet operational needs.

2. From mid-March to mid-November, the Visitor Center is open seven days a week from 0900 to 1700.

3. From mid-November to mid-March, the Visitor Center is open four days a week, Friday through Monday, from 0800 to 1600.

Entrance Station


1. From the Friday before Memorial Day to Labor Day, the park entrance station is open from 0800 to 1800 Friday through Monday.

Other Facilities


1. Park Headquarters is open 0800-1600 Monday through Friday. It is closed Saturdays and Sundays and all federal holidays.

2. The park maintenance area is closed to the public at all times except for persons conducting official business during normal operating hours 0700-1600 Monday-Friday. Deliveries are not received after 1530 Monday-Friday. It is closed Saturdays, Sundays and all federal holidays.

3. The Law Enforcement firing range and associated structures is closed to public use.
 
The following addresses and associated structures and grounds are closed for general use:

  • 15219 Nottingham Drive, Manassas, Virginia
  • 15309 Nottingham Drive, Manassas, Virginia
  • 17415 Mine Road, Dumfries, Virginia
  • 17409 Mine Road, Dumfries, Virginia
  • 16308 Dumfries Road, Dumfries, Virginia
  • 16150 Pleasant Road, Dumfries, Virginia
  • 18020 Park Headquarters Road, Triangle, Virginia
  • 17225 Mawavi Road, Triangle, Virginia
  • 5425 Turkey Run Road, Triangle, Virginia
  • 15214 Nottingham Drive, Manassas, Virginia
  • 14804 Bristow Road, Manassas, Virginia
 

Seasons of Operation for Campgrounds and Cabin Camps

Facility Open Closed
Cabin Camp 1 April 1 Monday after 1st weekend in November
Cabin Camp 2 4th Friday in April Monday after 1st weekend in November
Cabin Camp 3 3rd Friday in April Monday after 1st weekend in November
Cabin Camp 4 4th Friday in April Monday after the last Sunday in October
Cabin Camp 5 No Closure No Closure
Oak Ridge Campground* March-November December 1-February 28
Turkey Run Ridge Group Campground* No Closure No Closure
Chopawamsic Backcountry Area** March-November December 1-February 28

*May be closed periodically due to weather and road conditions. A, B, and C Loops have seasonal restrictions on use.
**Day use and overnight camping in Chopawamsic Backcountry Area is by permit only.
 
a paved road with a bike lane
Scenic Drive with a bike and pedestrian lane on the left

National Park Service C.Lynch

Determination of Closure/Limitations:

The closures are necessary for public safety when inclement weather is not conducive to visits and to protect the park’s cultural and natural resources from damage, vandalism, and destruction. Closures may also occur without advance notice at the Superintendent’s discretion for fiscal or operational reasons.

Park Roads


1. Park Headquarters Road - traffic and use is restricted to administrative use, park residents, and for those persons and visitors conducting official business during normal business operating hours.

2. Carters Day Camp Road - traffic and use is restricted to administrative use, park residents, and for those persons and visitors conducting official business during normal business operating hours.

3. Administrative Use Only Roads - the following roads are limited to administrative use for those persons conducting official business during normal business operating hours, and those with a special use or scientific research permit: Mawavi Road (Scenic to bridge), Pleasant Road, Old Black Top Road, Liming Lane, Taylor Farm Road, Burma Road, Spriggs Lane Fire Road, Lake One Road, Pyrite Mine Road, North Orenda Road, South Orenda Road, Lykes Fire Road.

4. Pyrite Mine Bridge – This bridge is closed to all vehicle and equipment traffic and use.

5. Scenic Drive - Open year round depending on weather.

6. Turkey Run Road - Open year round depending on weather.

7. Telegraph Road - Closed from November 1st to May 1st.

Bicycles are allowed on established public roads, administrative roads and Muschette Trail. Hiking trails are closed to bicycle use.

Determination of Closure/Limitations:

This measure is required to protect government property, facilities, employees, visitors, and wildlife. Pyrite Mine Bridge is closed indefinitely due to identified structural deficiencies. All park roads are subject to closure due to inclement weather. Bicycle use is limited to established public roads and unimproved roads. Resource sensitive areas may be temporarily closed to all modes of traffic on a case-by-case basis (36 C.F.R. § 4.30). Closures may also occur without advance notice at the Superintendent’s discretion for fiscal reasons.

General Access:


Entering and exiting the park by other than designated roads and trails or other designated public access points without a permit is prohibited.

Determination of Closure/Limitations:

This measure is required to provide for visitor safety and prevent resource damage from the
creation of social trails.

Area Closures:


The following areas are closed to the public:

1. All areas signed or posted as “Closed,” “Area Closed,” “Restricted Access,”
“Authorized Vehicles/Personnel Only,” or “Permitted campers only.”

2. All dams in the park are also closed to foot and bicycle traffic.

Determination of Closure/Limitations:

This measure is required to protect government property and facilities and the privacy of groups using the Cabin Camps, and to promote visitor safety.

Cultural Resource Areas


The following uses are prohibited in cemeteries and archaeological ruins: active recreation, including picnicking, running, hiking, bicycling, and field sports.

Determination of Closure/Limitations:

This measure is required to protect culture resources from damage.

Unmanned Aircraft:

Launching, landing or operating unmanned aircraft from or on lands and waters the NPS administers in Prince William Forest Park’s boundaries is prohibited without the Superintendent’s prior written approval.

“Unmanned Aircraft” is defined as a device that is used or intended to be used for flight in the air without the possibility of direct human intervention from within or on the device, and the associated operational elements and components that are required for the pilot or system operator in command to operate or control the device (such as cameras, sensors, communication links). This term includes all types of devices that meet this definition (e.g., model airplanes, quadcopters, and drones) that are used for any purpose, including for recreation or commerce.

Determination of Closure/Limitations:

Allowing unmanned aircraft before the park has properly evaluated whether this use is appropriate could result in unacceptable impacts to park natural and cultural resources, park values, and visitor safety. The park is adjacent to Quantico Marine Corps Base which has its own security and airspace restrictions. Under NPS Management Policies 2006, a new form of park use may be allowed only after a determination has been made in the Superintendent’s professional judgment that it will not result in the above mentioned outcomes. This interim policy is necessary because less restrictive measures would not prevent the associated physical, audible, and visual impacts and disruptions to natural view sheds, the visitor experience, wildlife and the park’s historic character (the park encompasses several historic districts listed in the National Register of Historic Places).

Vehicle idling:

All motor vehicle engines must be shut down when parked for more than 5 minutes. This also includes Oak Ridge and Turkey Run campgrounds during quiet hours from 2200-0800.

Determination of Closure/Limitations:

The exhaust from idling motor vehicle engines adds unnecessary exhaust fumes to the air and diminishes visitors’ enjoyment of the park’s peace and tranquility.

Generators:

Generators may be used in Oak Ridge and Turkey Run campgrounds only between 0800 and 2200. Safety measures that must be taken when using generators include: grounding, an absorbent pad underneath the unit, and having a portable fire extinguisher present.

Using generators at all other locations and times is prohibited unless the Superintendent approved it through a Special Use Permit or for the NPS’ administrative use.

Determination of Closure/Limitations:

The prolonged generator use in campgrounds areas adds significant audible disturbance to an otherwise peaceful park setting and to wildlife, and disrupts the visitor experience.

Geocaches:

Only NPS approved “Geocache” or “Letterbox” sites the Superintendent issued as a Special Use Permit are allowed. [Refer to § 7.96]

Determination of Closure/Limitations:

Placing geocaches and objects in the Park is a prohibited activity based upon potential negative impacts on natural and cultural resources. The negative impacts of concern include: digging holes to bury caches, manipulating vegetation and geological formations to conceal caches, disturbing underground cultural resources, archeological resources or both, and creating unauthorized social trails.

Balloons

Helium filled balloons are prohibited in all park areas including cabin camp areas. Releasing helium filled balloons is prohibited.

Determination of Closure/ Limitations:

This measure is required to protect wildlife that may encounter and become entangled with or swallow punctured balloons.

Inflatables/Moon Bounces

Large inflatable devices, also known as moon bounces are prohibited in public use areas.

Determination of Closure/Limitations:

This is required due to potential for resource damage and liability for injuries that may be sustained during the use of these in the park.


Golf

All park areas are closed to recreational golf, golf practice and hitting golf balls.

Determination of Closure/ Limitations:

Not all recreational activities are compatible in the park. Golf as a recreational activity in developed areas poses safety risks to park visitors and has the potential to cause damage to park and private structures and vehicles. Un-retrieved, ‘lost’ golf balls or both create a littering issue on the natural landscape.


Horseshoes

Pitching or throwing horseshoes is permitted at the following designated park provided horseshoe pits:

1. Williams Ballfield
2. Pine Grove Picnic Area
3. Oak Ridge campground

The remainder of the park area is closed to this activity unless authorized by the Superintendent’s prior written approval.

Determination of Closure/ Limitations:

Not all recreational activities are compatible in the park. Horseshoes as a recreational activity in developed areas poses safety risks to park visitors and has the potential to cause damage to park and private structures, and vehicles.

 
a yellow tent in a campsite in a forest with a bag hanging from a lantern hook
A tent in a campsite at Oak Ridge Campground

NPS photo C.Lynch

Camping and picnic areas:


Please refer to § 2.10 of this Compendium for specific camping area designations.

Except in an official emergency, the following areas are closed to public access except for valid permit holders or registered guests, and persons conducting official business:

1. Cabin Camps 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5,
2. Oak Ridge Campground,
3. Turkey Run Ridge Group Campground,
4. Prince William Forest RV Campground and
5. Chopawamsic Backcountry Area.

Oak Ridge Campground Comfort Stations in A and C Loops are closed from November 1st to the 3rd Saturday in April. Loop C is closed to camping from November 1st to the 3rd Saturday in April. The entire Oak Ridge campground is closed to camping and facility use from the first weekend in December through the first weekend in March.

Telegraph Road and Picnic Pavilion is open from the May1st to November 1st. Using these facilities outside of these months requires a special use permit.

The Telegraph Road and Pine Grove comfort station is open from May 1st through November 1st.

Determination of Closure/Limitations:

Due to low visitation and use, Oak Ridge Campground A Loop comfort station will be seasonally closed; Camping is an intensive use of park resources. All camping regulations protect the park’s natural and cultural resources and the park visitors’ recreational enjoyment. Limitations on camping seek to achieve this protection while providing an equitable allocation of camping opportunities to the public. Closure dates may be further adjusted to meet operational needs.

Parking:

1. Public parking is permitted 30 minutes before sunrise to 30 minutes after sunset except in designated camps and camping areas as a condition of permitted occupancy.
2. Overnight parking without a permit or that violates that permit’s conditions are prohibited.
3. Parking in any location other than designated parking spots is prohibited. This includes the roadway shoulder, grass areas, and in and around campsites.
4. Parking within 15 feet of fire hydrants is prohibited.
5. Parking in front of gates or blocking roadways is prohibited.

Determination of Closure/ Limitations:

The park is closed overnight and unauthorized visitors or vehicles cause a safety concern. Parking in designated spots prevents resource damage and also limits unsafe conditions created when vehicles are parked in roadways, in pedestrian areas, etc.


Vehicles

Visitors washing and repairing vehicles (other than short-term emergency repairs) in public areas in the park is prohibited.

Determination of Closure/Limitations:

This measure is required to protect park’s water supply and to prevent gray water and toxic substances being released into natural areas.

Use of Remote control cars: Only allowed by Special Use Permit.

Determination of Closure/Limitations:

Remote control cars can cause resource damage in wooded areas and can interfere with vehicular traffic on paved roads.

Vessels

The term “vessel” means every description of watercraft, or other artificial contrivance used, or that can being used, as a means of transportation on the water.

1. Vessel use is allowed by cabin camp groups only with a certified water safety instructor present. Water safety instructors must be identified in the camping permit.
2. The permit holder must forward the water safety instructor certification to the Park Superintendent no less than 24 hours before water activities occur.
3. All other vessel use on Lake 1 and Lake 5 is by permit only.
4. Vessel use is prohibited on creeks and in Carter’s Pond.

Determination of Closure/Limitations:

These areas are normally closed to public use. Requiring a permit allows the park to regulate these activities and assure that safety measures are in place.


Swimming activities

1. Swimming is prohibited in Lakes 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5, except by permitted cabin camp groups with a certified lifeguard present. Lifeguards must be identified on the camping permit, and proof of certification submitted to the park in advance. (Note: Lakes 2 and 5 are the same body of water; there are, however, two developed swimming areas in that lake. The developed swimming areas, numbered 2, 4 and 5, feature floating docks.
2. Swimming in Carters Pond is prohibited.
3. Swimming at the Prince William Forest RV Park pool is restricted to registered guests only.
4. Approved swimming diapers must be worn by all age appropriate children utilizing the pool at Prince William Forest RV Park.
5. Glass containers are prohibited at all designated swimming areas.
6. Wading in park waters is permitted.

Determination of Closure/Limit:

Discarded glass can break and cause injury to those recreating in swimming areas. Certified lifeguards ensure the safety of all those swimming and reduces the probability of injury or loss of life.


Paint

Possessing spray paint containers outside of motor vehicles is prohibited except by park residents at their residence, authorized park employees or contractors, or by special use permit conditions.

Determination of Closure/Limitations:

This measure is required to limit vandalism of park property.

§ 1.6 Permits

The public and researchers may apply for Scientific Research and Collecting Permits from the park.

For all other activities that may require a permit, refer to section § 7.96 - Activities That Require a Permit.

Determination of Closure/Limitations:

The Superintendent may issue a permit authorizing plant, fish or geological resources collection when the permit request includes a written research proposal and the Superintendent determines that the collection will benefit science, improve the protection of park resources or both.
 

36 C.F.R. § Part 2–General Regulations

§ 2.1 Preservation of natural, cultural and archeological resources

Firewood


Only Visitors in Oak Ridge Campground, Turkey Run Ridge Group Campground and all Cabin Camps may cut or collect wood to use. The wood must:

1. Be dead or down wood less than 6 inches in diameter.
2. Fit in campfire rings.
3. Be collected to use and consume during a stay with a valid permit.

Visitors are prohibited from using power tools like chainsaws.

Bringing any firewood into the park’s boundary, except for United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) certified as pest free firewood under 7 C.F.R. §§ 301.53-5 and 301.53-8, is prohibited. When a park law enforcement officer directs, the camper must burn firewood that violates the above in established fire rings. Camper’s failure to follow such direction may result in a citation, firewood seizure or both.

Determination of Closure/Limitations:

This closure is intended to prevent or slow the introduction of exotic insects, diseases or both, into Prince William Forest Park. The emerald ash borer (EAB) has already killed over millions of trees in those states that have been infested. Consequently, states and the federal government regulate firewood movement in and from infested areas. The USDA has documented that a number of other harmful species can be transported in firewood.

Plant Collection


Visitors may gather edible fruits, nuts, berries and mushrooms by hand to use personally or consume. Possessing edible mushrooms and unshelled nuts quantities are limited to 1 quart per person per day. Possessing fruits and berries are limited to one pint per person per day. Removing fruits, nuts, berries and mushrooms cannot disturb the remainder of the plant. Gathering for commercial use is prohibited.

Examples which may be gathered include:
1. Morel mushrooms (Morchella spp.)
2. Blueberries (Vaccinrum spp.)
3. Strawberries (Fragaria Virginiana)
4. Blackberries, Raspberries and Wineberries (Hubus spp.)
5. Grapes (Vifis spp.)
6. Elderberries (Sambucus pubens).
7. Gooseberries and Currants (Ribes spp.)
8. Huckleberries (Gaylussacia spp.)
9. Cherries and Plums (Prunus spp.)
10. Serviceberries (Amelanchier Laevis)
11. Persimmons (Diospyros Virginiana L)
12. Black Walnuts (Juglans nigra)
13. Hickory nuts (Carya spp.)
14. American Hazelnut (Corylus americana)
15. Apples (Malus spp.) or (Pyrus spp.)
16. Pawpaw (Asimina triloba)

All other plant and animal species (such as, but not limited to: conifer cones, fungi, lichens and “fiddle-head” ferns or other plant material, are closed to harvesting.

Determination of Closure/Limitations:

Limit is required to assure that gathering does not adversely affect the plant species’ reproductive potential or any other park resource. Removing cones, fungi, fiddle heads violates 36 C.F.R. § 2.1 (a)(1)(ii) ―Possessing, destroying, injuring, defacing, removing, digging, or disturbing from its natural state plants or the parts or products thereof. Limited collection of fruits, berries, and nuts is exempt from this restriction because the C.F.R. provides the Superintendents an avenue for permitting such activity and park managers have determined that collection of these items are not detrimental to future populations.

§ 2.3 – Fishing


1. Fishing complies with Virginia State Fishing Regulations.
2. Northern Snakehead will be killed and removed from the park when anglers catch them in Prince William Forest Park. Northern Snakeheads will not be thrown back into park waters. Anglers who catch a Northern Snakehead will report to Park staff the location caught and size of fish as soon as possible.
3. Notification may be made by e-mail to: prwi_resource_management@nps.gov, by phone to 703-221-4706 ext. 273, or fax to 703-221-2104.

§ 2.4– Weapons, Traps, and Nets

Persons legally possessing firearms must comply with all Virginia laws concerning concealed and open carry requirements when in the park. Possessing a concealed firearm for personal protection is allowed; no other use of a firearm is allowed in Prince William Forest Park.

Firearms, whether concealed or carried openly, are prohibited in all facilities in the park, including Park Headquarters, the Visitor Center, Maintenance facilities, and other offices.

Supervised target archery using traditional stick bows for recreational, educational, and interpretative purposes may be permitted when such use is requested in writing to the Superintendent and approved through a Special Use Permit or other written determination.

§ 2.10 – Camping and Food Storage

Camping at Prince William Forest Park


Camping is defined as erecting a tent or shelter of natural or synthetic material, preparing a sleeping bag, or other material for use, parking a motor vehicle, motorhome, or trailer for the apparent purpose of overnight occupancy.

Quiet Hours - Campgrounds Daily camping quiet hours are from 10:00 p.m. to 8:00 a.m.

General - Campgrounds:


Hammock camping will be allowed in Oak Ridge, Chopawamsic, and Turkey Run Ridge Group Campgrounds provided hammock straps are at least 1½ inches wide and they are not affixed to a tree less than 6 inches in diameter. Straps may not be attached to lantern poles. Ropes or similar material are not allowed for hanging any objects to fixtures or trees. No more than 2 hammocks may be used in any one site.

Determination of Closure/Limitations:

Using straps described above has not been shown to have detrimental effects on trees and tree bark.

Reservations:


You must be 18 years old or older to rent a cabin camp facility, an individual cabin, or to reserve a campsite on www.recreation.gov.

Determination of Closure/Limitations:

Cabin camp areas and facilities contain historic and non-historic structures, which if damaged may result in criminal penalties, monetary assessments or both for damage, clean-up, restoration or a combination. Minors cannot be held legally liable for financial obligations. The cabin camp rental agreement is a legally binding service contract.

Stay limitations:


Requests for exceeding stay limitations in any campground may be approved on a case-bycase basis and must be submitted to the Superintendent in writing. Forms are available at the Visitor Center during normal operating hours.

Oak Ridge Campground:


Loop A is available on a first come, first served basis. Loop A reservations may be made at the Visitor Center before 4:00 p.m.

Loops B and C must be reserved in advance through www.recreation.gov.

Campers may stay no more than 14 calendar days in a year (January through December).

Determination of Closure/Limitations:

Camping stay limitations are in effect as camping is deemed a short-term recreational activity and to limit individuals’ opportunity to reside in the park beyond a short-term recreational use.

In Oak Ridge Campground, tents must be in the bordered site area or within 40 feet of the parking pad.

Determination of Closure/Limitations:

To prevent undue soil compaction and associated injury and death of plant life, camping is limited to campsite borders provided for tent campers.

Camping in C Loop at Oak Ridge Campground is restricted to tent camping only.

Determination of Closure/Limitations:

Campsites in C Loop provide a more rustic and natural setting for camping. Adding RVs and motorhomes would detract from the desired visitor experience.

Oak Ridge Campground sites A23, A25, C32 and C33 are accessible to visitors with diminished mobility. The International Symbol of Access is posted at each designated site.

Determination of Closure/Limitations:

Providing designated sites for physically challenged visitors is a federal requirement. The sites have amenities which make them accessible for physically challenged persons and are located a short distance from comfort stations.

Campsites are limited to 6 people per site. Loops A and B are limited to 2 tents and 1 dining canopy, or 1 recreational vehicle and 1 tent or dining canopy. Sites in Loop C are limited to 2 tents and 1 dining canopy. In all sites, the total tents and canopies footprint will not exceed 200 square feet. The party size limit may be exceeded to include 1 immediate family member.

Checkout time at Oak Ridge Campground is 12:00 p.m. and camping fees for an additional night must be paid by that time. Campers arriving after 12:00 p.m. are required to pay for the site and display their permit receipts on their site posts in 1 hour of site occupancy.

All vehicles must park on the parking pad assigned to the campsite occupied and cannot extend to the campsite or into the roadway.

Determination of Closure/Limitations:

Vehicles parked on the parking pad cannot extend into the roadway because they will block traffic flow and create safety hazards for drivers using the road. Requiring vehicles to occupy specific areas prevents damage to park resources from vehicles traveling on unstable grounds.

RVs and Motorhomes must be of the size that all stabilization supports (wheels and support poles) will be on the parking pad and the vehicle will not extend into the roadway. Extension pull-out devices of RVs and motorhomes must fit on and in the site pads provided.

Recreational vehicles are limited to 32 feet in length and 12 feet in height. Trailers and fifth wheels are limited to 26 feet in length and 12 feet in height.

Determination of Closure/Limitations:

The winding access roads in Oak Ridge Campground cannot safely accommodate recreational vehicles or trailers longer than the above dimensions. Limits on the sizes of recreational vehicles entering the camp loops is necessary to protect park assets and resources and prevent private vehicle damage.

Turkey Run Ridge Group Campground:


Campsite reservations may be made through www.Recreation.gov only. Checkout time is
12:00 p.m.

Turkey Run Ridge Group Campground is restricted to tent camping only. All tents, dining flys, and other camping equipment must be in the designated bordered areas.

Determination of Closure/Limitations:

The park has established bordered areas for each group site to limit group sizes to accomplish the following: limit satellite campsite development; reduce the total area of soil compaction and thereby minimize damage and destruction to natural resources; reduce group conflicts; provide an audible and visual buffer between group sites; and prevent sites from extending into one another.


Campers may stay no more than 14 calendar days in a year with no more than 7 consecutive days at any one time.

Determination of Closure/Limitations:

Camping stay limitations are in effect as camping is deemed a short-term recreational activity and to limit individuals’ opportunity to reside in the park beyond short-term recreational use.

Each site's maximum camper capacities are:

Site Group Capacity
A 25
B 25
C 40
D 25
E 25
F 40
G 25
H 25
I 25











Determination of Closure/Limitations:

Group sites are designed for group camping and the size is set to accommodate larger groups while still limiting impact to the resource.

Chopawamsic Backcountry Area:


A permit is required for day use and overnight camping in Chopawamsic Backcountry Area of the park. Checkout time is 12:00 p.m.

Designated sites in Chopawamsic Backcountry Area are marked with a site post. Tents must be pitched within 20 feet of the post.

Permittees to the Chopawamsic Backcountry Area must display their park permit on their vehicle dashboard.

Maximum daily capacities are:

1. Campsites 1-8: 4 person maximum occupancy per overnight stay.
2. Day-use permits: the park will issue no more than 10 passes per day for groups or individuals of 1-4 people.

Determination of Closure/Limitations:

Campsite management is designed as a “dispersed concentration” system to minimize impacts to resource conditions and the backcountry visitor experience. Using “pre-existing” campsites concentrates and minimizes camping impacts in “moderate- to high-use” backcountry areas. Using ‘designated’ campsites concentrates and minimizes the spread of impacts in specific “high-use” areas or at sensitive resource sites with potential for significant impacts. Some areas are “closed” to backcountry camping to preserve special resource conditions and values.

Campers may stay no more than 14 calendar days in a year with no more than 7 consecutive days at any one time.

Determination of Closure/Limitations:

Camping stay limitations are in effect as camping is deemed a short-term recreational activity and to limit the opportunity for individuals to reside in the park for periods longer than what would constitute a short-term recreational use.

Cabin Camps: Maximum Occupancies
 
Cabin Camp Name Camp # Capacity Check-In Time Check-Out Time
Goodwill 1 151 1:00 p.m. 11 a.m.
Mawavi 2 148 4:00 p.m. 2:00 p.m.
Orenda, A unit 3, Unit A1 4 3:00 p.m. 12:00 p.m.
3, Unit A2 4 3:00 p.m. 12:00 p.m.
3, Unit A3 6 3:00 p.m. 12:00 p.m.
3, Unit A4 6 3:00 p.m. 12:00 p.m.
3, Unit A5 4 3:00 p.m. 12:00 p.m.
3, Unit A6 6 3:00 p.m. 12:00 p.m.
3, Unit A7 6 3:00 p.m. 12:00 p.m.
3, Unit A8 6 3:00 p.m. 12:00 p.m.
3, Unit A9 6 3:00 p.m. 12:00 p.m.
3, Unit A-9a 6 3:00 p.m. 12:00 p.m.
Orenda, B unit 3, Unit B1 10 3:00 p.m. 12:00 p.m.
3, Unit B2 10 3:00 p.m. 12:00 p.m.
3, Unit B3 10 3:00 p.m. 12:00 p.m.
Orenda, C unit 3, C Unit 76 2:00 p.m. 12:00 p.m.
Pleasant 4 200 2:00 p.m. 12:00 p.m.
Happyland 5 206 in summer 104 in winter 3:00 p.m. 1:00 p.m.

Overnight visits in Cabin Camp 3 A and B units are limited to 14 days per year.

Determination of Closure/Limitations:

Camping stay limitations are in effect as camping is deemed a short-term recreational activity and to limit the opportunity for individuals to reside in the park for periods longer than what would constitute a short-term recreational use.

General


1. Prohibited in all cabin camps: Pets; fireworks; camping trailers and tents; smoking inside all buildings; lanterns attached to trees; structural recreation equipment including but not limited to inflatables (such as a “moon bounce”), waterslides, trampolines, and petting zoos; and heaters and electrical appliances (with the exception of hair dryers and curling irons, which are permitted in bathhouses only). Sleeping is prohibited in the dining halls and craft lodges.

2. Any item or activity Superintendent or Superintendent’s designee deemed inappropriate are also prohibited.

3. Destroying, defacing or removing buildings and improvements, trees, shrubs, flowers, wildlife is illegal. The Permittee is liable for any costs the Park incurs due to associated use including, but not limited to: damages to buildings or equipment stocked by the Park, disposal of items left behind, etc. The Permittee is subject to prosecution for any theft of or damage to park property the Park determines to be criminal.

4. Permittee or Permittee’s guests cannot exchange money on NPS property. This includes but is not limited to collecting admission fees to the Permittee’s event, selling merchandise, food, services or gambling.

5. Alcohol is prohibited in the camp without a valid Virginia Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control (ABC) permit. An ABC approved permit must be filed with the Cabin Camp office no later than 10 days before the first day of the encampment. A $500,000 liability insurance policy must also be filed with the NPS named as the additionally-insured. The insurance policy must also be filed with the Cabin Camp office no later than 10 days before the first day of the encampment. Selling alcohol is prohibited.

6. Vehicles are not permitted in cabin unit areas. Occupants may unload equipment and personal property at the dining hall, but must immediately move vehicles to a designated parking lot before moving the equipment and personal property into camp buildings.

7. Campers are restricted to their respective cabin camp after sunset. Campers may only use park roads necessary for access to and from their camp area.

Prince William Forest RV Campground:


1. From May 1 through September 30, RV camping is limited to 14 (calendar) days total, unless additional days are approved by the Prince William Forest RV Campground manager.

2. From October 1 through April 30, RV camping is limited to 28 (calendar) days total, unless additional days are approved by the Prince William Forest RV Campground manager.

§ 2.11 – Picnicking

Picnic areas are first come, first served, except for the Telegraph Picnic Pavilion. Telegraph requires a reservation. Picnicking that violates established conditions is prohibited.

Prohibited:

1. Picnicking when the activity would interfere with normal agency functions or visitor use activities already in progress.

2. Holding additional picnicking sites and or tables for other individuals not yet present.

Determination of Closure/Limitations:

Picnicking is restricted from those areas that would adversely impact the historic scene or interfere with the park’s operations. Using picnic sites and tables in designated picnic areas of the park are based on a first-come, first-served basis.

§ 2.13 – Fires

Designated Areas:


Fires are permitted in the following areas only:

1. In picnic areas and camping areas, excluding the Chopawamsic Backcountry Area. Contained fires are permitted in park-provided grills, camp stoves and portable grills (noncombustible container with a minimum container depth of 2”, enclosed sides, and a bottom) only.
2. In cabin camps, fires may be made in park constructed council rings, fireplaces, and park-provided grills only.

Established Conditions for Fires in Designated Areas:


1. Fires must be attended at all times. Fires with sustained flame lengths over 24 inches are prohibited.
2. Only wood or charcoal may be burned in cooking or warming fires in fire rings and park provided grills.
3. Fires must be completely out before departure from any campsite, cabin, picnic area or other approved area for fires.
4. High fire danger closures will be in effect as noted:
  • During Virginia state-imposed burn bans and periods of high fire danger open fires and charcoal fires are prohibited. The Superintendent may impose burn bans as needed according to local conditions.
  • During Virginia state-imposed burn bans and periods of high fire danger, only self-contained gas or liquid fuel grills and stoves are permitted, provided their features allow them to be immediately shut off.
5. Use open-flame lanterns is prohibited.

Determination of Closure/Limitations:

Using open fires in the park is regulated to protect human life, structures and natural resources. During extreme weather conditions, open-pit fires may be restricted to preclude the accidental ignition of wildfires. Using campfires encourages natural woody debris removal around the campsite which disturbs natural appearances and processes; causes heat damage to soil and vegetation, and promotes damage to or live and dead standing trees removal. Using campfires often leads to widespread construction of stone fire rings which are unnatural in appearance, concentrates visitor use and impacts by establishing campsites at inappropriate areas, and produces charcoal build-up in high-use areas. Campfires also contribute to human-caused wildland fires.

 
Two Australian Shepherds in the park
Australian shepherds in the park

NPS photo C.Lynch

§ 2.14 – Sanitation and Refuse

Trash Free Park


Prince William Forest Park is a “trash free” area. Dumpsters may be provided at the Superintendent’s discretion in high visitation areas.

Determinations of Closure/Limits:

The Superintendent supports a “pack-in, pack-out” ethic as it aligns with the federal government environmental management’s initiatives.

Disposal of Human Waste


In areas more than a ¼ of a mile from restroom facilities, and when carryout is not feasible, human body waste must be buried 4 to 6 inches deep in organic soil in an area the public does not frequent, not visible from trails, campsites or developed areas, and at least 100 feet from any water source. During the winter when organic soil is not exposed, solid human body waste must be buried 100 yards from any campsite or established travel route to a depth of 12 inches in snow whenever possible.

Determinations of Closure/Limit:

Solid human waste can spread disease and must be disposed of away from water sources to minimize the pollution potential. Burying solid waste at least 4 inches in soil minimizes the potential for waste material washing into nearby water sources and eliminates human waste’s visual impact and odor. Removing refuse minimizes litter and enhances the visitor backcountry experience and protects wildlife from the impacts of discarded food and potentially hazardous trash.

§ 2.15 – Pets


1. Unless a permit authorizes, areas closed to pets are: Turkey Run Ridge Group Campground, all public buildings and all Cabin Camps.
2. Pets may be tied up at campsites and other developed areas only, and may only be left unattended for less than 1 hour in those locations.
3. Animals may not be tied to vehicles or objects in parking lots.
4. Domesticated animals that are hoofed (such as pigs, horses, cows, etc.) are not allowed on park grounds.
5. Visitors and the public are prohibited from bringing pets that are venomous or may be considered dangerous into the park.
6. Pet excrement must be disposed under the following conditions:
a. When pet discharges bodily waste, the owner must collect and then discard outside the park.
7. Residents must keep their pets under the following:
a. The residence must not be shared with other non-family park employees.
b. Comply with § 2.15

Determination of Closure/Limitations:

Pet animals must be restricted for public health and safety, and to protect natural and wildlife resources. These policies exist to protect pets from being harassed or hurt by predators, to protect wildlife from being harassed or hurt by pets, to prevent disease exchange between domestic animals and park wildlife, and to allow others to enjoy the park without disruptive pets. Using electronic control devices (ECDs) is not a substitute for an actual physical restraint for pets and does not meet the conditions in 36 C.F.R. § 2.15.

§ 2.16 – Horses and Pack Animals

Horses and pack animals are strictly prohibited. Humans use pack animals to transport materials. Those animals include, but are not limited to horses, mules, oxen, pigs, and goats.

Determination of Closure/Limitations:

Horses and pack animals can destroy resource and vegetation.

§ 2.19 – Winter Activities

The following paved park roads, parking areas or both are designated for skiing, snowshoeing, ice skating, sledding, inner tubing, tobogganing under the conditions noted:

1. Telegraph Road when closed for winter storms,
2. Telegraph Parking Area when closed for winter storms, and
3. Scenic Drive from lot D past Oakridge Campground to Turkey Run Road, when closed for winter storms.

§ 2.20 – Skating, Skateboards and Similar Devices

Visitor may only using roller skates, skateboards, roller skis, coasting vehicles, or similar devices in 2 designated areas:

1. In park residence areas; and
2. Along bike lane on Scenic Drive from lot D to Oak Ridge road.

Determination of Closure/Limitations:

Roller skating, skateboarding, and similar activities is permitted in residential areas for employees and their families. Such use does not pose a threat to park resources or impose a risk to park visitors. Use along the bike lane on Scenic Drive from lot D to Oak Ridge is permitted because it provides ample space for multi-use recreation.

Using mobility assistive devices to transport impaired visitors, is permitted on the multi-use trail between parking lot D and Oak Ridge Road on Scenic Drive, and on park fire roads. Using Mobility Assistive Devices on all other park roads and trails is prohibited.

§ 2.21 – Smoking


Smoking is prohibited:

1. In all public and concession buildings.
2. In all cabin camp buildings.
3. Within 25 feet of the entrance to all public buildings, all cabin camp buildings and all NPS and concession storage areas.
4. In all government-owned or leased motor vehicles, fuel storage areas and fuel dispensing areas.
5. In all government-owned park housing.

Smoking is permitted in:

1. Campgrounds
2. Picnic areas.

Determination of Closure/Limitations:

Federal regulations prohibit smoking in federal buildings, including within 25 feet of entryways. Smoking is further prohibited to protect park resources, reduce the risk of fire, or prevent conflicts among visitor use activities.

§ 2.22 – Property

Visitors may not leave property or vehicles in day-use parking areas overnight without a permit or permission from a law enforcement ranger.

Unattended property may be left for longer than 24 hours in the following locations and under these conditions:

1. Visitors on authorized trips to the Chopawamsic Backcountry Area are permitted to leave unattended vehicles in the Chopawamsic parking area.
2. Visitors may leave property unattended in campgrounds for more than 24 hours without the Superintendent’s permission if they pay in advance for unattended site use.

Determination of Closure/Limitations:

The park closes at dark. For safety and security reasons, vehicles may only be left unattended in overnight accommodation areas: campgrounds and cabin camps.

§ 2.23 – Recreation Fees

Fee Areas at Prince William Forest Park


Under Title 36 C.F.R. Part 71, recreation fees are established for the following entrance fee areas, and/or for the use of the following specialized sites, facilities, equipment or services, or for participation in the following group activity, recreation events or specialized recreation:

Park entrance fees are as follows:
  • $15 per vehicle for a seven-day entrance pass.
  • $10 per motorcycle for a seven-day entrance pass.
  • $7 per person on foot or bicycle for a seven-day entrance pass.
  • $30 per person, with guests in vehicle, for an annual park pass.
  • $80 for “America the Beautiful” Interagency national fee area Annual Pass (Free for Active Duty Military and Dependents).
  • $80 for the lifetime Senior Pass for persons 62 and up. Four annual Senior Passes purchased in prior years may be traded in for a lifetime Senior Pass.
  • Free Access Pass (Lifetime, for persons with a permanent disability).
  • Free Volunteer Pass (Annual, for persons who volunteer more than 250 hours with the NPS).

Site use fee areas per day:


Turkey Run Campground - 25 Person Group Site $65
Turkey Run Campground - 40 Person Group Site $80
Oak Ridge Campground - Regular Per Tent Site $26
Oak Ridge Campground - Senior & Access Pass per Tent Site $13
Telegraph Picnic Pavilion $80
Cabin Camp 1 (Goodwill) $575
Cabin Camp 2 (Mawavi) $575
Cabin Camp 3 (Orenda) - Individual rentals in A and B units
  • 4 Person Cabin $40
  • 6 Person Cabin $50
  • 10 Person Cabin $60
Cabin Camp 3 (Orenda) - Group rental in C unit $425
Cabin Camp 4 (Pleasant) $595
Cabin Camp 5 (Happyland) - Summer $725
Cabin Camp 5 (Happyland) - Winter $625

§ 2.35 –Alcoholic Beverages and Controlled Substances

Prince William Forest Park Areas Open to Alcoholic Beverages


1. Cabin camps 1, 2, 4, and 5, requires official Commonwealth of Virginia Alcohol and Beverage Commission permit be presented to the park before occupancy.
2. Cabin camp 3 group areas (B and C units), requires official Commonwealth of Virginia Alcohol and Beverage Commission permit be presented to the park before occupancy.
3. Cabin Camp 3 A unit in individual cabins.
4. Telegraph Picnic Pavilion requires official Commonwealth of Virginia Alcohol and Beverage Commission permit be presented to the park as part of the permit application.
5. Oak Ridge Campground campsites, with campsite rental.
6. Chopawamsic Backcountry Area, with campsite permit.
7. Personal residences in park.
 

Prince William Forest Park Areas Closed to Alcoholic Beverages


Except in the areas listed above in 1-7, consuming alcoholic beverages is prohibited. Consuming alcoholic beverages includes possessing a bottle, can or other receptacle containing an alcoholic beverage that is open, or has been opened, or whose seal has been broken or the contents of which have been partially removed.

Determination of Closure/Limitations:

Alcohol consumption in certain park areas is deemed inappropriate to: avoid incidents stemming from alcoholic beverages consumption; to discourage underage drinking; to reduce hazards from broken glass and waste from discarded cans; and reduce the potential for water emergencies at the unguarded lakes, ponds or both.

§ 2.62 – Memorialization


The following terms and conditions apply:
  • The scattering of remains by persons on the ground is to be performed at least 100 yards from any trail, road, developed facility, or body of water.
  • The scattering of remains from the air is to be performed at a minimum altitude of 2000 feet above the ground.
  • No scattering of remains from the air is to be performed over developed areas, facilities, or bodies of water.
Determination of Closure/Limitations:

Scattering of cremated human remains is a reasonable accommodation to visitors and may not result in any negative resource impact.
 
a law enforcement vehicle with lights on the roof
Law Enforcement vehicle parked in a cabin camp

NPS photo C.Lynch

36 C.F.R. § PART 4 –Vehicles and Traffic Safety

§ 4.10 – Travel on Park Roads and Routes


1. Park roads open for travel by motor vehicles are identified in the NPS’s official Prince William Forest Park brochure.
2. Administrative fire roads are for use by NPS staff and those with a valid permit only.
3. Driving off roads or along the sides of roads in the park is prohibited.
4. Off-road vehicle use is prohibited in the park, except for NPS’ ATV and UTV use, and similar vehicles during park operations. Any other use must be requested in writing to the Superintendent, including for use in Cabin Camps.

Determination of Closure/Limitations:

Vehicular travel on unimproved roads can cause significant resource damage, conflicts with agency functions, and cause visitor use impacts.

§ 4.11 – Vehicle Load, Weight and Size Limits


The following load, weight and size limits, which are more restrictive than state law, apply to the roads indicated under the conditions, permit or both as noted:

1. Operating vehicles on park roads exceeding 10 tons in gross weight and 32 feet in overall length is prohibited. Operating trailers exceeding 26 feet is prohibited. Service, emergency, and contracting vehicles are exempt from this restriction with the Superintendent’s prior written permission.
2. The historic wooden bridge at approximately MP 1.3 is restricted to 20 tons usage.

§ 4.21 – Speed Limits


1. 5 miles per hour in Prince William Forest Park RV campground.
2. 10 miles per hour in all campgrounds and cabin camps.
3. 15 miles per hour on Telegraph Road and all gravel roads, unless otherwise posted.
4. 25 miles per hour on Park Entrance Road, Scenic Drive, Park Headquarters Road, Turkey Run Ridge Road, and Oak Ridge Road.

§ 4.30 – Bicycles


1. Bicycle use is limited to established paved and unpaved public roads, parking areas, and unimproved administrative roads. Unimproved roads open for travel to bicycles are identified in the NPS’s official Prince William Forest Park brochure.
2. Bicycles are prohibited on trails.
3. Bicyclists must obey all motor vehicle traffic regulations including stop signs and speed limits.
 
Download the compendium: Superintendents Compendium 2019 PDF format

Last updated: April 24, 2019

Contact the Park

Mailing Address:

18100 Park Headquarters Road
Triangle, VA 22172

Phone:

(703) 221-7181

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