General Management Plan Amendment Initial Public Comments: Correspondence ID #s 2001–2500


# 2001
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence:
Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Mary Isham
___________________________
# 2002
Name: Arnold, JoEllen
Correspondence:
Tule Elk once ranged over much of California but are now confined to a few small areas, including Point Reyes National Seashore where I've been fortunate to view and photograph them. It is already distressing to me (and to the elk) that they are allowed so little room to roam and thrive.
Do not allow the killing, sterilizing, removal or further curtailing of the territory of these beautiful native ungulates.
Do not allow the expansion of ranching and farming within the park lands; planting row crops, raising livestock other than the cattle already permitted would jeopardize the well-being of native predators and other species who need safe, undisturbed lands to call their homes.
I visit Point Reyes National Seashore to see its magnificent wildlife and want to see the land maintained to keep wildlife thriving.
Thank you.
JoEllen Arnold
Sacramento, California
___________________________
# 2003
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Thank you.
___________________________
# 2004
Name: Birch, Suzanne C
Correspondence: I don't understand why these issues are necessary-just let them be!
___________________________
# 2005
Name: Goldman, Ron
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Ron Goldman
___________________________
# 2006
Name: O'Connor, Gloria
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service. In the past, people have made the mistake of eradicating various species without considering the detrimental effect of this to the ecosystem.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species. Choosing an easy solution of removal isn't right. When will that end?
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality. There are enough of these commercial livestock already and it isn't necessary to expand further.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Gloria O'Connor
___________________________
# 2007
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: It would be a travesty to kill or get rid of the free-roaming tule elk or other wildlife. The elk have already been diminished by the actions taken to fence them in during the drought. This is their only home.
Plans for Point Reyes should include the free movement of the elk along with actions to help continue their recovery. It is essential that habitat for endangered species be preserved, not turned into farmland with crops in a row or to use this land for livestock. Other lands would be more appropriate for these uses.
It is the National Park Service's duty to preserve the natural habitat so that wildlife can thrive and people can visit Point Reyes to enjoy the parkland and the wildlife that call it home. It would be desirable to remove or, at least, reduce any cattle ranching or dairy farms, too. If they remain, they need to be constrained so as not to damage the habitat or threaten the wildlife living there.
Thank you.
___________________________
# 2008
Name: Mayfield, James R
Correspondence: There used to be hundreds of thousands of these animals. We don't need any more cattle. Protect the Elk, relocate them if need be.
___________________________
# 2009
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
As a concerned USA citizen (who lives just one state over from southern California), I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
___________________________
# 2010
Name: Rauf, Sabrina
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
S. Rauf
___________________________
# 2011
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
David Sherman
___________________________
# 2012
Name: IOSUPOVICI, MIRIAM L
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
___________________________
# 2013
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: I am outraged hearing of the inhuman plans for the native elk in California. Let the animals live in peace as nature intended!
___________________________
# 2014
Name: FIORE, MELODY F
Correspondence: I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
___________________________
# 2015
Name: Awan , Aashir
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Dr Aashir Awan
___________________________
# 2016
Name: Hewitt, Anne-Marie
Correspondence: I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore. I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
___________________________
# 2017
Name: Bean, F
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
F Bean
___________________________
# 2018
Name: Steelman, Dawn
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Dawn Steelman
___________________________
# 2019
Name: Goldsmith, Ken
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
___________________________
# 2020
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I write to support free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore. Please do not allow any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery is consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Please do not allow commercial lease holders on our public lands to dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Thank you for your attention.
Mary Troland
___________________________
# 2021
Name: Heath, Linda A
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization, or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens, or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore for the wildlife, the ecosystem, and the American people.
Sincerely,
___________________________
# 2022
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
___________________________
# 2023
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Robin Carey
___________________________
# 2024
Name: Rule, Juliann
Correspondence: I am writing to support free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I am against any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't be able to dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
___________________________
# 2025
Name: Wolfberg, Amy
Correspondence: I strongly oppose removing/killing Tule Elk from their native land/habitat in Point Reyes National Seashore. This is their home! Why kill them to benefit agriculture and ranching? Don't farmers and ranchers have enough land already? With millions of cattle and merely several thousand Tule Elk in California, surely we can allow the elk to remain in their habitat, particularly if it is protected national park land.
Frankly, I'm disappointed the National Park Service would even have this proposal on their radar.
___________________________
# 2026
Name: Jones, Nina L
Correspondence: I am writing in support of free roaming Tule Elk at Point Reyes. Commercial lease holders on our public lands should not dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. The park services amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore, including all flora and fauna native to the area.
Thank you.
___________________________
# 2027
Name: day, john g
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
My wife and I have enjoyed visits to Pt. Reyes National Seashore for over two decades. On our last visit last Dec. we were impressed by the Tule Elk restoration but distressed when we learned of the significant die off and killing of these elk.
While we fully understand the reasons for extension of historic dairy farm tenure on Pt. Reyes, we strongly believe that these commercial lease holders on public lands shouldn't influence wildlife removal or exclusion. Any cattle operations must be managed to accommodate tule elk and other native wildlife and must not harm or disturb habitat fro threatened or endangered species.
We also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens, or pigs which would degrade wildlife habitat and water quality and well as create conflict with predators.
While the inability to find cost effective relocation alternatives to the existing farms is a reality, the Park Service's amendment to the General management Plan must prioritize protecting the natural values which make Pt. Reyes National Seashore such a unique area.
Sincerely,
John and Judith Day
___________________________
# 2028
Name: Blaker, Shawna R
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Shawna R Blaker
___________________________
# 2029
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: Dear Sir or Madam:
I strongly support the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore which is a fine example of the National Park Service (NPS) mission of providing wilderness habitats for Americans to enjoy. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems.
Therefore, I oppose any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. If there is an issue of overpopulation then I strongly recommend relocation of the surplus to additional wilderness sites or introduction of more robust predators such as wolves.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Cattle-ranching operations must accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species. Living with wildlife should be incorporated into the ranching business plan and there are many techniques that have been developed through NPS, NGO and other conservation agencies or organizations that effectively minimize destructive interaction with wildlife.
You should ABSOLUTELY reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality as well as undermine the original and appropriate goal of preserving these wild lands. Animal husbandry operations of various kinds should instead seek already-available commercial lands for expansion.
First and foremost, the Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
___________________________
# 2030
Name: DANEHY, HILARY
Correspondence: Wildlife deserve a place in our parks - Point Reyes is the national park that tule elk should always call home.
It is shameful that the Park Service let half the park's original herd die during the state's 2012-2014 drought by keeping them fenced in without adequate water and forage; then the Service shot 26 elk during 2015 and 2016.
We must protect our wildlife now!
___________________________
# 2031
Name: Tuman, Susan B
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service. This is their land.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality. National park lands should remain just that: park lands, not agricultural or cattle farms.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore!
Sincerely,
___________________________
# 2032
Name: Colley, Leslie
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Leslie Colley
___________________________
# 2033
Name: Russell , Colleen
Correspondence: Leave the Tule Elk free to roam. No killing, sterilization, fencing them in. Ranchers can fence in their cattle.
___________________________
# 2034
Name: Sperlin, Marvin
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service,
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore for the enjoyment of the people and our descendants.
___________________________
# 2035
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Jen-Mai Wong
___________________________
# 2036
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence:
Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Brian Yanke
___________________________
# 2037
Name: Christiansen, Diane
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
The tule elk in Point Reyes National Park should be allowed to roam free! After a successful reintroduction of this species to the area, there is no reason to get rid of them because of cattle.
___________________________
# 2038
Name: Heiden, Jessica
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I support the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park.
Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Jessica Heiden
___________________________
# 2039
Name: R, Jennifer
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
___________________________
# 2040
Name: raftery, rita
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
___________________________
# 2041
Name: Waters, Marc E
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
I object to the removal of any tule elk from their native land. We shouldn't allow row crops or new commercial animal farming, and any cattle ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Marc Waters
___________________________
# 2042
Name: Michael, Edward L
Correspondence: I urge the USPS to adopt the "No Ranching" alternative for future management of the Point Reyes National Seashore and the north district of Golden Gate National Recreation Area.
The Seashore and the Recreation Area should be natural. I am generally supportive of natural (non -industrial/non-agricultural) landscapes in the small fraction of the American landscape devoted to national parks (and of the US Forest Service's policy of retiring agricultural leases at the earliest opportunity). “Natural” is simply a defining characteristic of the American concept of a national park and is what separates them from designated national monuments, national forests and other forms of semi-protected federal landscapes.
The Seashore and the Recreation Area should be open to public use. Another defining characteristic of a US national park is that it is generally open to use by the public, unfettered by restrictions of that use to protect private interests that must pertain if private business is allowed on this land. Major portions of this public land should not be set aside (fenced off) and maintained for private benefit.
The Seashore and the Recreation Area should be managed for the benefit of native species. Parks should not be managed for the benefit of domesticated plants and animals, especially in an era and in a region where native species are being pressured - even extinguished - - at an alarming rate. This Park is home to many imperiled native species. The Thule Elk resurgence is an establish success story, one that agricultural interests would like to limit in order to expand their bovine herds and their income. (Owners and managers, have, in fact, a documented willingness to sacrifice elk rather than reduce their domesticated animal herds in times of drought.) Restoration of Coho salmon steelhead trout has begun, but is threatened by surface and groundwater impacts from livestock, as well as by physical deterioration in waterways and riparian areas from livestock. Agricultural interests would trade grasslands for row crops, further eroding conditions for native flora and fauna.
The Seashore and the Recreation Area should be managed to minimize the effects of climate change and drought. Bovines and row cropping hardly meet that need. It is established that both exacerbate drought and warming.
currently occupying sites on the Seashore and recreation area have no legitimate claim for extension of leases that cost the taxpayer money, ecological services, and recreational opportunities.
___________________________
# 2043
Name: M., C.
Correspondence:
Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
C.M.
___________________________
# 2044
Name: Kaufman, Andrea D
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Andrea Kaufman
___________________________
# 2045
Name: Daniel, Kian
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Kian Daniel
___________________________
# 2046
Name: Maddalena , B
Correspondence: Please don't kill the tule elk nor remove them from their land. Animals are God’s children too and deserve life respect safety and love. Animals protect their mates and their offspring . S
___________________________
# 2047
Name: Brunner, Robbe A
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Robbe Brunner
___________________________
# 2048
Name: Ballinger, Katharine S
Correspondence: As a volunteer with Point Reyes National Seashore and a frequent visitor to the park (an avid hiker and birder), I am very concerned about the alternatives presented for the Point Reyes National Seashore General Management Plan Amendment. I understand the historical significance of the partnership between conservationists and ranchers in the establishment of the park, but I also believe that there is room for evolution and improvement of management practices. As it stands, I am concerned that the Park Service is prioritizing the needs of ranchers and livestock over those of native species and ecosystems, and over the wishes of the rest of the public who enjoy the Seashore.
The return of the tule elk in California and in Point Reyes in particular is an exciting conservation success story, and one that we should be careful not to undo. It is a privilege for ranchers to continue to operate in the Seashore (and not a right), and if they are to continue to operate, it is incumbent upon them to manage their cattle to deal with the reality that they are operating in a National Park alongside wild animals and with the risks that entails.
I support the free-roaming elk herds in the Point Reyes National Seashore and strongly oppose any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. I also urge you to reject any conversion of park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming. Commercial leaseholders on public land should not dictate wildlife policy.
I strongly support the "No Ranching and Limited Management of Tule Elk" alternative proposed in order to allow the continued expansion of the free-ranging elk herd and phasing out of ranching on the seashore. Returning the tule elk to the Seashore was the first step. Now let's continue to restore the Seashore for all to enjoy.
___________________________
# 2049
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Saskia Santos
___________________________
# 2050
Name: Baclija, Martin
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Martin Baclija
___________________________
# 2051
Name: Puglia, Mary L
Correspondence: The Tule elk ls found only in California. There are other ways to control population than slaughter. Hunters do not need a Tule elk head as a trophy.
___________________________
# 2052
Name: Miller, Kyle
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Kyle Miller
___________________________
# 2053
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: The proposal to allow farmers to utilize, and more importantly, destroy the natural habitat of the Point Reyes National Park is devastating to say the least. There are few places in this country remaining that preserve the beauty and indigenous species that populate America. This proposal would lead to the destruction and impact the wildlife of foxes, coyotes, elk, bobcats, badgers, and so many bird species. The land scape will change, food webs will be ripped asunder, and calls to "contain" intrusive species will grow loud.
This is a terrible idea. The fact that there are cow farms and "grandfathered" agreements with little to no reimbursement or tax implications is a big enough injustice. Expanding this is not the right decision.
I hope you consider the impact to the wildlife and Point Reyes as a world destination for so many people and remove any such farming proposal.
___________________________
# 2054
Name: Carbia, Vanessa
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Thank you.
___________________________
# 2055
Name: Buscemi, Donna M
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service. I am personally alarmed at the way the cattle industry has taken over our public lands and concerned at the way the federal government agencies gives preferential treatment to cattle, which are a non native species of North America. We need to protect and preserve our Native Species of which the Tule Elk are.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species. Our Wild horses and Burros also get all the blame for range degradation when in fact we all know it is the cattle.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore and the Native Tule Elk..
Sincerely,
___________________________
# 2056
Name: Rowland, Frank
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I STRONGLY object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk, and their recovery, has been a success. There is no reason to discontinue this effort. Whatever commercial cattle-ranching operations allowed must accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Frank Rowland
___________________________
# 2057
Name: N/A, Wendy
Correspondence:
Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Wendy
___________________________
# 2058
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
D LaFarge
For the people, not corporations.
___________________________
# 2059
Name: Cruz, Lynne
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I'm writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also strongly urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
___________________________
# 2060
Name: Nelson, Brad W
Correspondence: Tule elk are native, cows are not native. Side with nature- -let the elk be, relocate the cattle.
___________________________
# 2061
Name: McCarty, Matthew
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
___________________________
# 2062
Name: Bline, Abigail
Correspondence: I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of tule elk at Point Reyes National Seashore. Tule elk are an endangered species which should be protected by policies of the National Park Service.
The interests of commercial lease holders on our public lands should come secondarily to the interests of the general public, which benefit from preserving intact ecosystems. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. Wildlife habitat and water quality should not be degraded on public lands for the sake of private, commercial interests.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
___________________________
# 2063
Name: Salinas, Andrea A
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore. The national parks are maintained by the tax dollars of all residents of the US for the benefit of everyone, not just special interests. I live in the bay area, as the majority of visitors to Point Reyes do. I can't even bring my dogs on a hike to Point Reyes, and I fully understand the potential cost to the natural vegetation of some of our only preserved natural bay area habitat; so how as the national park service can you destroy the Tule Elk for the benefit of ranchers when you have been charged with protecting our national patrimony?
Sincerely,
Andrea Salinas
___________________________
# 2064
Name: Ferguson, S. K
Correspondence: Protect the elk in their Point Reyes home.
No CATTLE!
___________________________
# 2065
Name: Altenbach , Marilyn
Correspondence: I come to Tiburon every year and appreciate California's protection of wildlife.
Please, do not kill the tule elk!! The public is turning against the killing of wildlife!
___________________________
# 2066
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
J. A. Turco
___________________________
# 2067
Name: Green, Rax
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Rax Green
___________________________
# 2068
Name: Nelson, Lucille J
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely. Lucille,
___________________________
# 2069
Name: Holmes, Tara
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Tara Holmes
___________________________
# 2070
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Vince
___________________________
# 2071
Name: Neil, Linda
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.National parks should be free of these infringements!
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
___________________________
# 2072
Name: St John, Clayton
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Clayton St. John
___________________________
# 2073
Name: Polesky, Trey J
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Trey Polesky
___________________________
# 2074
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Helen
___________________________
# 2075
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I lead a bird walk each year to Point Reyes National Seashore. Besides the wild birds, which everyone enjoys, we are always excited to see the wild tule elk. Hearing about the plans to control them, I decided to write and express my support for the free-roaming tule elk herds there.
Though I understand the frustration that the ranchers have, there must be a better way to handle the situation than the fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
I agree with the other comments provided by the Center for Biological Diversity as well: Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Gordon Beebe
Santa Rosa, CA
___________________________
# 2076
Name: Stotz, Gail G
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
strongly support the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore. deeply object to fencing or killing of elk or other native animals in any national park. I have enjoyed spotting the tule elk on my visits to Point Reyes, and the recovery of their natural population has been an encouraging bit of news to me in these uncertain times for our planet.
Commercial interests are winning out far too often at the expense of natural and precious wildlife. Our public lands must be protected for all to enjoy, now and gor many generations to come. Private lease holders must not be allowed to subvert native ecosystems for commercial purposes on public lands.
I have faith that the Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan will prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Please don't let the elk (and me) down!
___________________________
# 2077
Name: Amarillas, Cristina L
Correspondence: I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
___________________________
# 2078
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Erica Thompson
___________________________
# 2079
Name: Hammer, N/A
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I can remember the first time I saw the herd of tule elk at Tomales Point. It was so exciting to be there. I'd read the story of how the animals had been re-introduced to the land. And now, it is distressing to hear about the proposed plans for removal.
I support the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
___________________________
# 2080
Name: Voltz, F and E
Correspondence: The Tule elk at Point Reyes National Seashore deserve more than to be starved, killed or moved off of their historical grazing lands. . .all regrettable steps taken by the National Park Service.
We don't need more cattle grazing or row crops on public lands where the amount of potable water is already scarce.
As a parallel, how would the human residents of Marin county appreciate being forcibly removed to Solano county? Not so much and the Tule elk likely have the same attitude.
ANY cattle operations need to be considered for appropriate co-existence with the Tule elk and other wildlife species dependent upon the existing habitat.
___________________________
# 2081
Name: Vinton, Joanne M
Correspondence: I first visited Point Reyes in late 1970s. It seemed so beautiful and wild. Then I moved away and didn't visit Point Reyes again until a few years ago. It seemed so different, degraded and used up.
I'm a vegetarian, so I don't have any interest in maintaining ranching operations at Point Reyes. Personally, I don't understand why those ranches would have historical significance.
So, it's probably no surprise that I would favor the "No Ranching and Limited
Management of Tule Elk" alternative.
Although Johne's disease is mentioned only briefly on page 10 of the newsletter, I imagine this will cause conflict between cattle and elk. From what I read about the disease, I'm guessing that the land has been degraded by ranching.
Re-introduction of Tule Elk has been a success. To consider wiping them out again for the sake of ranches is outrageous. The natural history of the area is more important to me than ranching history.
___________________________
# 2082
Name: Traver, Willoe
Correspondence: National parks should be places for wildlife to be able to roam free! It is a place that is set aside to protect the creatures that share this beautiful planet that we live on.
This is a priveledge and a responsibility to care for all living beings on this earth, including animals and humans.
___________________________
# 2083
Name: Grassia, Frank S
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
As a Californian, I believe it falls to California to be the example for the rest of the country for ecological and environmental responsibility. The cattle industry is devastating for both concerns, and we should be reducing its presence - not encouraging it. Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations we do allow must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
F. Sebastian Grassia
___________________________
# 2084
Name: Lemoine, Kathryn
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species. This land was meant for wildlife, not domestic animals.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
___________________________
# 2085
Name: Loperfito, Tamara
Correspondence: Too many wild animals are losing as development encroaches. We must adapt to live with them not against them.
___________________________
# 2086
Name: Maurer, Lance
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial leaseholders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Lance Maurer
___________________________
# 2087
Name: Beauchamp, Catherine
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Catherine Beauchamp
___________________________
# 2088
Name: Spencer, Martha
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Martha Spencer
___________________________
# 2089
Name: Moss, Paul
Correspondence: I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Thank you for your consideration.
___________________________
# 2090
Name: Kartman, Sue A
Correspondence:
Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Sue A Kartman
___________________________
# 2091
Name: Jairett, Angela A
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
___________________________
# 2092
Name: hadjsalem, jamila
Correspondence: National Park Service,
I strongly SUPPORT free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore and I am strongly OPPOSED to any removal, fencing, sterilization, or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk were successfully reintroduced to Point Reyes in 1978, and I am against any plans that diminish their number or stress the elk population. They are a native species and help balance the ecosystem there. They are desperately needed- -as are all native species- -especially in this time of climate change. We need to help stabilize regions, not de-stabilize them.
Cattle ranchers who want to use Reyes Point should work in conjunction with the elk population that is there, not push to have them relocated or killed. As our National Park Service, we, the public, rely on you to make sure that specific interests do not harm the greater good of our lands; cattle ranchers should be strictly monitored and regulated to ensure that they do not harm any wildlife or native species, as the cost of such acts would fall on us, the public, in the form of loss of wild land and loss of native species.
am also very strongly OPPOSED to Point Reyes being converted to crop land (ie. for artichokes and other row crops) and opening it up for further ranching, for animals such as sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens and pigs. Turning Point Reyes into land for row crops would drastically harm the local wildlife and negatively effect the water quality in the area. Allowing an expansion of the types and areas of ranching would most certainly lead to conflicts with major predators, such as coyotes and bobcats. That would, in turn, lead to killing of the predators and a more unbalanced ecosystem, something that can be altogether avoided by keeping Point Reyes the natural, wild, wonderful place that it is.
Thank you,
Jamila HadjSalem
Stafford, Connecticut
USA
___________________________
# 2093
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Sherri West
___________________________
# 2094
Name: Teasley, Regi
Correspondence: Dispense with plans to kill or harm the Tule elk on Point Reyes reserve. This native sub-species should be preserved, not "managed" into further decline.
___________________________
# 2095
Name: Hesselink, Joanne D
Correspondence:
Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Joanne Hesselink
___________________________
# 2096
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
___________________________
# 2097
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Ronald Merlino
___________________________
# 2098
Name: McAlister, Kevin W
Correspondence:
Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Kevin W. McAlister
___________________________
# 2099
Name: Dugan, Pamela
Correspondence: Dear Superindent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
___________________________
# 2100
Name: Robbins, Linda
Correspondence:
Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I STRONGLY object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service. And that FACT that some of these elk were forcibly STARVED and shot to death during the 2012-2014 drought is not only disgusting and disturbing, it is morally bankrupt.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies - these are lands that belong to all of the citizens of America - tax-paying, compassionate citizens. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
___________________________
# 2101
Name: Duran, Patricia
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Patricia Duran
___________________________
# 2102
Name: Diamantis, Michelle
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
The Park Service is about preserving the NATIONAL PARKS and the WILDLIFE. The NATIONAL parks are for the PEOPLE, not farmers, ranchers or other commercial/business-related entities.
Thank you,
M. L. Diamantis
___________________________
# 2103
Name: Sorrells, James L
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
James Sorrells
___________________________
# 2104
Name: Michele, Lara
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Lara Michele
___________________________
# 2105
Name: Neumann, Nancy L
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely
___________________________
# 2106
Name: Read, Sherri
Correspondence: No more ranchers destroying habitat for their gain. We in fact Do own these lands. I live in a Elk area and we let them roam. Protect your yard with a fence. No more free destructive ranching practices in All or Any public lands.
___________________________
# 2107
Name: Hooper, John C
Correspondence: I am a frequent recreational user of the Point Reyes National Seashore (hiking, beach-combing, kayaking)
In general, I support continued ranching at the PRNS but not its expansion or intensification, nor conversion to untested ranching activities, such as row-crops, the introduction of new animals (chickens, sheep etc).
The new plan should incorporate proven sustainable agricultural practices which minimize conflicts with the natural and wildlife values the park was created to protect.
The new plan needs to incorporate and regularly update scientific data related to water quality, endangered species and the like, particularly as these values are influenced by the presence of cattle.
Outmoding ranching practices that the NPS currently tolerates, and which must be prohibited under a new plan, include killing wildlife, allowing cows to enter and damage creeks and ponds, giving preference to domestic livestock over natural resources and wildlife, maximizing number of cattle despite drought and unknowns of climate change, overgrazing and trampling pasture lands by confined dairy herds, silage mowing during nesting season; allowing ranchers to spread manure slurry onto grasslands that spreads diseases to wildlife and permits cattle manure to pollute fresh and marine waters, and the failure by NPS to regularly monitor number of cattle and conditions on leased lands.
Thank you for this opportunity. Please keep me on your mailing lists.
___________________________
# 2108
Name: Spotts, Richard
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent:
I have visited Point Reyes National Seashore (PRNS) and I greatly care about its proper management and protection. I believe that the National Park Service (NPS) has been excessively influenced and intimidated by private ranchers who feel entitled to graze their livestock on these PRNS public lands. Too often, NPS officials at PRNS and higher up the chain of command have caved in to this rancher pressure and allowed narrow self interest to supersede the broader national interest. This NPS pattern of cowardice and capitulation must end.
I strongly support continuation of the current free-roaming tule elk herds at PRNS. These herds should only be limited by available forage so as not to degrade natural systems and processes. These herds must not be reduced to appease ranchers or make more forage available for private livestock.
As such, unless needed for bona fide ecological reasons, I vigorously oppose any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of tule elk in PRNS. Tule elk are an essential part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been a positive success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the NPS mission.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands should not dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Indeed, I wish that all livestock would be removed from PRNS. However, if cattle-ranching operations are required by law, then they must be managed to accommodate tule elk and other native wildlife, and should not harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of PRNS lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create serious conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
In summary, this NPS amendment to the General Management Plan should put the national interest first and foremost, and thereby prioritize protecting tule elk and the other natural values of PRNS.
Thank you very much for considering my comments.
Sincerely,
Richard Spotts
Saint George UT USA
___________________________
# 2109
Name: Nowak, Joseph E
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Joseph Nowak
___________________________
# 2110
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore. I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands should not dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and should not harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
___________________________
# 2111
Name: Andregg, S.
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore. Thank you for taking the time to read my comment.
Sincerely,
S. Andregg
___________________________
# 2112
Name: Schwarz, Kurt R
Correspondence: I support the continued presence of free-roaming Tule elk at Point Reyes National Seashore. The Tule elk are native to the area, having winked out in the 1850s, with reintroduction in 1978 (Watt, 2015). Their reestablishment is a great success story. I find it puzzling you would consider suppressing the herd to benefit ranching, or row crops. Either would result in less wildlife habitat, which is what draws people such as myself to Point Reyes. Compatible on-going ranching and agriculture is fine, but those interests should not be permitted to dictate range management, or expansion of the footprint of ranching and agriculture. Expansion would also lead to more conflict between ranchers and farmers with natural predators.
See Laura A. Watts, The Continuously Managed Wild: Tule Elk at Point Reyes National Seashore, Journal of International Wildlife Law & Policy, 18:289-308, 2015, https://web.sonoma.edu/gep/ensp/docs/Faculty Papers/Watt 2015 - tule elk at PRNS.pdf
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# 2113
Name: Barrett, Reginald H
Correspondence: I strongly support the "No Ranching and Limited Management of Tule Elk" option. I visit the PRNS regularly and do not come to see cows, I come to see elk. The sooner all agricultural activity is eliminated and the elk populaltion maximized the better.
___________________________
# 2114
Name: Mackrow, Paula
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species. Private for profit operations on this special land should be considered only if there are benefits to the public at as a whole. I oppose the new status of handouts and welfare ranching on public lands. Climate changes must be considered in the needs and protection of the wildlife of our public lands.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
Despite the change in administration, a temporary situation, the Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore per its mandate.
___________________________
# 2115
Name: Misek, Jolie
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Jolie Misek
___________________________
# 2116
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: One of the reasons given for keeping or even expanding the ranches on the Seashore is the stewardship of the ranchers. Where's the evidence? True, there is little development on the land, but good stewardship requires more than just an absence of buildings. Some fields have been so overtaken by thistle and other invasive weeds that I'm not surprised that the ranchers have to buy hay. Other fields appear to have been grazed to dirt. No wonder the elk go after the hay; there's not a lot left for them to eat. A poorly managed field doesn't leave a lot for any other species, plant or animal. How can this be defined as good stewardship?
Some people say that cattle have played a part in this ecosystem for so long that the system can no longer function without them. This theory is apparently based on the idea that cattle limit the spread of some weeds and the reality that the government does not adequately fund the NPS. This theory only makes sense to me if cows are kept within the carrying capacity of the land. Based on the ranchers' complaints about the elk, a native species that should remain here, and the appearance of some of the ranches, cows have exceeded their carrying capacity.
Summers are already getting longer and hotter and drier. Seeing huge dust clouds blow across fields eaten bare or covered only with nonnative grasses & weeds breaks my heart. Remember The Dust Bowl? The farmers and ranchers and government back then assumed that the loss of a native ecosystem wouldn't be a big deal. But they were wrong. We shouldn't keep making the same mistake. The farmers suffered the most, but the public had to pay for the reparations. Should we still have to pay to keep repairing the damage done by poor management of this land? If ranchers want to keep leasing public land, then they should pay a fair amount, relative to current real estate prices. I'd also really like ranchers to acknowledge that they are leasing land from us and show some gratitude instead of bullying those who question their continued presence on our public land. If I were renting them a house and they trashed the place, I'd find new tenants.
The NPS also has a responsibility to preserve the biodiversity of this park now and for the future. If the current ranching model will not do this, then the NPS must change the model. I think the ranches have exceeded the carrying capacity of the land and should be restricted. I also think that the ranchers who remain have an obligation to be better stewards than they have been. I'd like to see their plans for controlling weeds, protecting soil, and preserving biodiversity. I'd like them to care for this land as if they alone were responsible for handing down an intact ecosystem to their great great great great grandchildren. That's stewardship.
___________________________
# 2117
Name: Waters, Michelle
Correspondence: My family has been visiting Point Reyes National Seashore for close to 30 years. It is an incredible place to go for hiking, wildlife watching and immersing oneself in nature, and we particularly enjoy seeing and photographing the tule elk.
We are opposed to all efforts by the National Park Service to restrict movement of the elk by fencing them in. We understand that half the tule elk population died during the drought because they were fenced in and couldn't access water, and that the NPS has also shot elk. This is unacceptable, as is NPS's proposal to close 18,000 acres to the elk herd so cattle will have the only access. These are public lands that we pay to protect and maintain with our tax dollars, and it is unconscionable to give this handout to cattle ranchers and dairy farmers.
We are also completely opposed to the NPS allowing conversions of wildlife habitat at Point Reyes for any agricultural uses, including row crops and new animal farming. Again, this land belongs to the public and should not essentially be stolen from us to benefit private industry. Any conversion like this will destroy wildlife habitat, and we know that if you allow ranchers to raise more domestic animals in the park that wildlife such as bobcats, mountain lions and coyotes will pay the price with their lives. This is completely unacceptable and outrageous that NPS is even considering this proposal.
According to NPS legal settlement with the Center for Biological Diversity, your agency is required to consider management alternatives to remove all cattle ranching and dairy farming from the park. These uses are incompatible with a wilderness area as they destroy wildlife habitat and cause water pollution. At the very least, all ranching of farmed animals in Point Reyes to be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, so they may survive and thrive, but the most environmentally sound outcome would be to completely end all animal agriculture within Point Reyes National Seashore.
___________________________
# 2118
Name: Rhine, Heather
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Heather Rhine
___________________________
# 2119
Name: rangel, louise
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,Louise rangel
___________________________
# 2120
Name: Griffith, Eric
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Eric Griffith
___________________________
# 2121
Name: Cuviello, Pat
Correspondence:
Many times I have visited Point Reyes National Seashore. It's a great place for hiking and wildlife watching, and seeing the tule elk are always one of hte highlights of my visits.
I'm opposed to all efforts by the National Park Service to restrict movement of the elk by fencing them in. I understand that half the tule elk population died during the drought because they were fenced in and couldn't access water, and that the NPS has also shot elk. This is unacceptable, as is NPS's proposal to close 18,000 acres to the elk herd so cattle will have the only access. These are public lands that we pay to protect and maintain with our tax dollars, and it is unconscionable to give this handout to cattle ranchers and dairy farmers.
I'm also completely opposed to the NPS allowing conversions of wildlife habitat at Point Reyes for any agricultural uses, including row crops and new animal farming. Again, this land belongs to the public and should not essentially be stolen from us to benefit private industry. Any conversion like this will destroy wildlife habitat, and I know that if you allow ranchers to raise more domestic animals in the park that wildlife such as bobcats, mountain lions and coyotes will pay the price with their lives. This is completely unacceptable and outrageous that NPS is even considering this proposal.
According to NPS legal settlement with the Center for Biological Diversity, your agency is required to consider management alternatives to remove all cattle ranching and dairy farming from the park. These uses are incompatible with a wilderness area as they destroy wildlife habitat and cause water pollution. At the very least, all ranching of farmed animals in Point Reyes to be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, so they may survive and thrive, but the most environmentally sound outcome would be to completely end all animal agriculture within Point Reyes National Seashore.
___________________________
# 2122
Name: Rodriguez-Zimmerer, Diana R
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
I was born and raised in Santa Clara Valley, CA and just moved to Utah 2 months ago for reasons of employment. I still defend wildlife and feel very strongly the cattle ranchers bully everyone, leaving the lands they graze decimated. They are ruining the natural ecosystems and causing the native wildlife to be displaced.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely, Diana Rodriguez-Zimmerer
___________________________
# 2123
Name: Hazelhofer, Galen
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Ms. Galen Hazelhofer
___________________________
# 2124
Name: Gutelius, Danielle
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Danielle Gutelius
___________________________
# 2125
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
DAP
___________________________
# 2126
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: I support free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
___________________________
# 2127
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming Tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization, or killing of elk in the park. I recently had the pleasure of visiting the Tule Elk Reserve for the first time, and I was deeply moved by the herds of elk that looked so natural and impressive in the park. After my visit, I was inspired to research more about them, and their recovery has been an incredible success story for the NPS. Any future plans that jeopardize that recovery should be taken incredibly seriously.
It is my opinion that commercial lease holders should not be able to dictate wildlife removal on public lands. Any continuing cattle-ranching operations should be managed to accommodate the elk and other wildlife, not the other way around.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Kate Lockary
___________________________
# 2128
Name: Bayer, Judith E
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
___________________________
# 2129
Name: Fitzgerald, Gerry
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Gerry Fitzgerald
___________________________
# 2130
Name: Clark, Audrey A
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
___________________________
# 2131
Name: Newberry, Roxie E
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent and National Park Service,
I have just learned about the possible removal and/or killing of the tule elk who live in Point Reyes National Seashore. I am thrilled and thankful that the re-introduction of the tule elk in Point Reyes has been successful, and I am writing in full support of the free-roaming tule elk herds. I oppose any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of tule elk in the park. As these are public lands, I sincerely hope the National Park Service will hold the rights of the public, private citizens like myself, to enjoy these spaces that we pay for with our taxes. Commercial lease holders, such as ranchers and farming businesses, should not be allowed to dictate tule elk or other wildlife removal for the profit of their businesses. Any leasing by cattle ranchers or farmers must be managed extremely carefully so that native wildlife and their habitat in the park will be protected.
I also oppose any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. Again, this would make these lands unavailable to the general public and would threaten the life and well-being of the park's coyotes, bobcats and other predators, and would degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
Please prioritize the protection of Point Reyes National Seashore habitat and its wild inhabitants regarding this amendment to the General Management Plan. Every acre of wilderness is precious, and threatened at this time because of humans. Please uphold the mandate of the National Park Service and protect this beautiful park.
Thank you for your time and consideration of my views.
Sincerely,
___________________________
# 2132
Name: Kutilek, Michael
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am a Conservationist Biologist with experience in studying re-introducied tule elk in the Diablo Range east of San Jose, CA. Those re-introductions and subsequent studies were established to expand the range and population size of this iconic native sub-species.
With that in mind, it is essential that we support maintenance of free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore to achieve the conservation goals for this species. Therefore, I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. The elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with native species and degrade their habitat.
In conclusion, the Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting, rather than degrading, the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Michael Kutilek, Ph.D
Emeritus Professor
San Jose State University
___________________________
# 2133
Name: Gladfelter, Barbara
Correspondence: I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
___________________________
# 2134
Name: Johannsen, Mary
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Mary Johannsen
___________________________
# 2135
Name: Patterson, Carol J
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
___________________________
# 2136
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent I'm contacting you to express my wishes that the Tule Elk at Point Reyes National Seashore remain free roaming and not be removed or sterilized. Commercial interest should always be secondary or better yet not even be considered if there is the least bit of conflict with the natural landscape, plants or animals. Free range cattle comprise a meager 3% of the nations beef market and that simply is not enough of a necessity warranting these people having their cows on our land, interfering with our Tule Elk. Row crops are even more laughable. I live in row crop country and if Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, South Dakota, Southern Minnesota aren't enough room to grow row crops then we're in a heap of trouble and the little dab that they can grow at Point Reyes isn't going to matter other than someone capitalizing from the taxpayers national treasures.
Thank You, Bob
___________________________
# 2137
Name: Quinn, Patricia A
Correspondence: I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
___________________________
# 2138
Name: Stires, Robert
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Robert Stires
___________________________
# 2139
Name: Redi, Tami
Correspondence: What is wrong with the National Park Service?
I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of tule elk in the park..or anywhere else for that matter.
I support free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore.
You are a park - protect your inhabitants!
___________________________
# 2140
Name: Patterson, Thomas C
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
YOU SHOULD BE WORKING TO REDUCE AND EVENTUALLY ELIMINATE CATTLE RANCHING AND ALL OTHER AGRICULTURAL ACTIVITIES IN THE NATIONAL SEASHORE. IT IS NATIONAL PARK LAND AFTER ALL AND IT BELONGS TO ALL OF US. DO NOT EXPAND ANY OF THESE OPERATIONS. MANAGE THE PARK TO HELP THE WILDLIFE!
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
___________________________
# 2141
Name: Weisenbah, Ed
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Ed Weisenbach
___________________________
# 2142
Name: Levitt, Lyndell
Correspondence: I am an American citizen, presently living in Canada, writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore. I believe it is incumbent on the National Park Service to support a healthy population of tule elk in this area. I strongly object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. I strongly feel the previous acts of fencing and starving the Tule elk by the Park Service are unconsciousable. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the purported mission of the National Park Service.
By definition, the National Park Service should be involved in preserving our keynote national wildlife, rather than being influenced by and working in concert with commercial livestock interests. Commercial lease holders on our public lands should have no influence on wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and should not harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality, further endangering the recovery efforts for the Tule elk.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
___________________________
# 2143
Name: Rappaport, Alex
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Alex Rappaport
___________________________
# 2144
Name: Rappaport, Alex
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Alex Rappaport
___________________________
# 2145
Name: Artman, Cara A
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Cara Artman
___________________________
# 2146
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
___________________________
# 2147
Name: Baxter, Anne
Correspondence: My own comments follow, FYI:
I am an often user of the Point Reyes National Seashore (hiking, kayaking) . I live in Inverness and have been a supporter of the National Seashore for the 25 years that I have lived here
I support continued ranching at the PRNS but not its expansion or intensification, nor conversion to untested ranching activities, such as row-crops, the introduction of new animals (chickens, sheep etc).
The new plan must incorporate proven sustainable agricultural practices which minimize conflicts with the natural and wildlife values the park was created to protect.
The new plan needs to incorporate and regularly update scientific data related to water quality, endangered species and the like, particularly as these values are influenced by the presence of cattle.
Outmoding ranching practices that the NPS currently tolerates, and which must be prohibited under a new plan, include killing wildlife, allowing cows to enter and damage creeks and ponds, giving preference to domestic livestock over natural resources and wildlife, maximizing number of cattle despite drought and unknowns of climate change, overgrazing and trampling pasture lands by confined dairy herds, silage mowing during nesting season; allowing ranchers to spread manure slurry onto grasslands that spreads diseases to wildlife and permits cattle manure to pollute fresh and marine waters, and the failure by NPS to regularly monitor number of cattle and conditions on leased lands.
Thank you for this opportunity. Please keep me on your mailing lists.
___________________________
# 2148
Name: Wyatt, Lisa
Correspondence: Please SUPPORT the tule elk 1000%. Dont make promises you MIGHT break later. These animals deserve habitat that is not undercut later by greed.
___________________________
# 2149
Name: Hoffman, Jeff
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I support the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object in the strongest terms to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are a natural, indigenous, and important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands are privileged to hold those leases and shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would do great harm to the land and create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
___________________________
# 2150
Name: HutchinsonMuri, Donna
Correspondence: I cannot imagine the Northern California Coast,the Oregon and Washington Coasts and the entire Northwestern Pacific Rim regions without the Elk They are as much of the landscape as the ocean, the hills, the fog, the rays of sun,the colorful grasses,they are in fact a part of the entire picture. What is happening to our society,to our world when some people want to change the natural scene,the natural migration of species that were on this planet long before humans? It has always disturbed me that humans act with some notion of authority over other life forms,when they can't find peace and empathy with each other. I could easily reflect on scientific and ecological arguments for and against almost anything relating to biology,ecology and the environmental state of our planet. I could offer authentic facts,calculations and theories to prove without any doubt that the evolution of mankind has disrupted the fate of our planet, sometimes for the better, but more often not. I can only HOPE and continue expressing my opinion that money,agendas,politics,power and man's need for total control will be lessened by the strength of natures way,which is and always has been the ultimate path for survival.
___________________________
# 2151
Name: Benucci, Joe
Correspondence: Dear Pt. Reyes Superintendent,
I am writing as a private citizen, military veteran, and as a father in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore. The amendment proposed that would consider fencing, removing, sterilizing or killing of elk in the park is NOT in the interest of the American public, but in the interest of a small group of lease holders that do not represent a vast percentage of the people you have sworn to serve. The Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story that I have seen with my own eyes. I hope to someday soon get to show my toddler son the majestic beauty of these wild Elk, and how the work that has taken place to restore native species and ecosystems has been a success! This work is consistent with YOUR mission!
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
As a father, a veteran, and a conservationist, I explore you to keep Pt. Reyes wild. Please reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality. You are proposing the exact opposite of what Chile is doing, after nearly a century of failed policies that priorized the interests of sheep rancher, over the ecological preservation of the Patagonian pampas. Please don't re-learn what has already been learned...domestic farming and the preservation of wild spaces are incompatible.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Respectfully,
Joe Benucci
Father/Veteran/Private Citizen/Conservationist/Someone who still believe in the use of science and data driven decision making
___________________________
# 2152
Name: Absolonova, Karolina A
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on the public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Dr. Karolina Absolonova
Prague
Czech Republic
___________________________
# 2153
Name: Dawn, Delta
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent and NPS employees,
I am writing as a concerned citizen of the US in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park (or outside the park, but realize you have no jurisdiction there). Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Far too often in our brief history have we wiped out or directly contributed to the significant loss of species from their native habitats. This happens in our country and all over the world and shows little to no evidence of slowing down. We must be the voices of those who cannot speak and protectors of the land.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The NPS should be the forefront for education of protecting wild and federally managed lands, resources, and wildlife and should dictate where livestock farms are infringing on these natural lands. Livestock is not native to our lands, but these elk are. Don't they deserve the protection over invasive species? We must do better for ourselves, our children, and for generations to come. Let us be the bringers of positive change, and protect the earth. We can start with these elk, the red wolves in the east, and so many other species who need our constant vigilance to survive and prosper.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Delta Dawn
___________________________
# 2154
Name: Bonner, Tracey
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Tracey Bonner
P.S.
OUR Wildlife is under attack. They do not kill for the thrill of it or because they deem another animal unnecessary. Why should people be allowed to get away with these atrocities. The time for inaction has passed. Before we lose another species due to clearing lands for ranchers, oil, gas, or coal,to name just a few simply, to make a profit, we need to TAKE ACTION NOW to save our planet and ourselves at the same time!
___________________________
# 2155
Name: Dennison, Carolyn A
Correspondence:
Dear Superintendent,
We humans are stewards of the Earth and as such we must protect all life on it.
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Carolyn Dennison
___________________________
# 2156
Name: Chylewski, Emilly
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Emilly Chylewski
___________________________
# 2157
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Asphodel Denning
___________________________
# 2158
Name: Gardner, Kristen
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore. Thank you for taking the time to read my comment.
Sincerely,
Kristen Gardner
___________________________
# 2159
Name: Gregston, Debra F
Correspondence: Stop killing these beautiful animals! They have as much right to live as we do.
___________________________
# 2160
Name: Agrusa, Ana Maria
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
___________________________
# 2161
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Kristin Konstanty
___________________________
# 2162
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Robin Jenkins
___________________________
# 2163
Name: Hollahan, Gloria T
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Gloria Hollahan
___________________________
# 2164
Name: Agnew, Erika
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
___________________________
# 2165
Name: Coulehan, Jack
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Jack Coulehan
___________________________
# 2166
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Thank you
___________________________
# 2167
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
___________________________
# 2168
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence:
Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Stephanie E.
___________________________
# 2169
Name: bocca, emy
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
___________________________
# 2170
Name: Brand, Dennis
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Dennis Brand
___________________________
# 2171
Name: Serylo, Shannen
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Shannen Serylo
___________________________
# 2172
Name: Lopez, Jose R
Correspondence: The National Park Service bending to the will of cattle barons,really? I guess you've all lost your minds and forgot your mission statement oh yeah I forgot you probably don't even know what it is. This doesn't surprise me considering who's in the White House!
___________________________
# 2173
Name: Dutra, Renee C
Correspondence: It would be tragic to lose the beauty and majesty of seeing the native elk. Not to mention any environmental impact that may incur by disturbing the natural order of things.
___________________________
# 2174
Name: murcko, john
Correspondence: please prioritize wildlife over commercial interests in our public spaces and park lands . The wildlife need these spaces unmolested in which to thrive and we need the wildlife there for inspiration.
___________________________
# 2175
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence:
Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Suzanne Guest
___________________________
# 2176
Name: Teplin, Lynne
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Lynne Teplin
___________________________
# 2177
Name: Clark, Jeff D
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Jeffrey Clark
___________________________
# 2178
Name: Flocco-McMaster, Kathy
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
___________________________
# 2179
Name: Elliott, Coya
Correspondence: Please consider letting the multi generation ranchers keep their land leases. I would love for our meat, dairy and vegetables to continue to be raised and grown locally in Marin County. Visiting the farmer's market every week and buying directly from the ranchers and farmers is a true treasure in today's mass produced and long distance shipped food culture. Thank you!
___________________________
# 2180
Name: Ramos, J
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species. I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
___________________________
# 2181
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
***Please leave the Tule Elk and the National Park lands alone!
Sincerely,
___________________________
# 2182
Name: Yang, Sylvia
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Sylvia Yang
___________________________
# 2183
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: Please allow the tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore to roam freely and not be culled. In an age when wildlife is dying out and Point Reyes is the only successful habit for this species, it is imperative they be allowed to flourish.
Public lands management should never be subordinate to private interests and environmental conservation should never be overridden by by commercial interests. These are public lands intended for public use. Their environmental integrity needs to be preserved at all costs.
___________________________
# 2184
Name: Meyer, Moranda
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
___________________________
# 2185
Name: Bradford, Leslie
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Leslie Bradford
___________________________
# 2186
Name: Miller, Pamela Z
Correspondence:
Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Pamela Miller
___________________________
# 2187
Name: King, Fiona G
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Fiona King
___________________________
# 2188
Name: Spates, Georgeanne
Correspondence: Since when do we, the American public, support domestic animals in this case cattle, over and above native wildlife? The tule elk are indigenous to California and should be preserved in healthy populations. Our native wildlife are struggling enough with climate change's droughts, floods, wildfires, etc.; they do not need more pressure from farm lobbyists. There are other lands that can be used by domestic cattle. Wildlife such as the tule elk has evolved to be in the habitats that they are presently in.
Let's support the tule elks continued existence.
Thanks for your consideration of my comments.
___________________________
# 2189
Name: Brooks, Darlene
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Darlene Brooks
___________________________
# 2190
Name: Paquette, Danielle P
Correspondence: Please allow these animals to roam free in their natural habitat. Cattle ranchers must become more responsible by providing their own barriers that separate the cattle from the elk. They must work with conservationists on this issue which has been an ongoing one with the bison as well. It has been scientifically proven that the chance of cattle becoming infected with brucellosis from either of these animals is extremely low. I do not know the exact figures but they probably account for less than a 1% chance of ever contracting brucellosis. This is so problematic considering the fact that taxpayers are footing the bill for these operations. Most people are oblivious to this and most if they knew would be furious to find out that they have been fully fooled and forced to be financial pawns in these crude and callous federal culling operations. This is not the democratic way.
___________________________
# 2191
Name: Youngelson, Noah
Correspondence: ear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Noah Youngelson
___________________________
# 2192
Name: Mookini, Kathyrn T
Correspondence: Stop killing the animals ! There beautiful and we need them to balance nature
___________________________
# 2193
Name: Kazak, Ilene M
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
___________________________
# 2194
Name: Kazak, Ilene M
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Ilene M. Kazak
___________________________
# 2195
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence:
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
___________________________
# 2196
Name: Park, Robert J
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Robert Park
___________________________
# 2197
Name: Rosenthal, Andrew
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
What will your grandchildren think about your short sighted and selfish actions. I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely
Andrew Rosenthal
___________________________
# 2198
Name: Badger, Shawnee P
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Shawnee Badger
___________________________
# 2199
Name: Pastrick, Kim A
I have visited Point Reyes 3 times over the last 20 years and have told numerous people how beautiful it is. I am always awestruck by the wildlife that inhabit the land and believe they should be protected. This is a national park, not commercial land. I am so tired and disgusted by our continued destruction of our wildlife's habitats. They deserve to live as much as we do.
I am opposed to row crops, any new commercial animal farming, and any removal of Tule elk from their native land. We must save and preserve Point Reyes National Seashore for the public and for the wildlife.
Stop the greed and do what is right for our country and our planet.
Sincerely,
Kim Pastrick
___________________________
# 2200
Name: Pastrick, Kim A
Correspondence: Do not allow row cropping, new animal farming, nor the removal of Tule elk from their native habitat. This is a national park and belongs to the public and to the beautiful animals that inhabit the land.
I live in Ohio and have visited this beautiful national seashore three times. I am in awe of the land and the animals. I have told many people about this special place. Please do not threaten this land with harmful actions. We need to stop destroying what is left of our natural land and habitats.
Kim Pastrick
___________________________
# 2201
Name: Lefferts, Edward T
Correspondence: Minimum Viable Population ensures adaptive radiation. In a Mass Extinction(this the Sixth Extinction) each individual of each species is a Most Valuable Player. If it is a process is it a problem? If it is a process is it easier to participate? adaptive radiation p.95 Handbook of Bird Biology 3rd ed., Lovette & Fitzpatrick.
___________________________
# 2202
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: Elks and wildlife add beauty and attraction to Pt Reyes National Seashore. Please don't kill them, instead, investigate on spay and neuter techniques for population control.
___________________________
# 2203
Name: Care, Shari
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I write with regards to the National Park Service's updating of its park planning and possibility that exists that it may kill and/or remove elk from Point Reyes at the request of ranchers who enjoy private cattle grazing leases in the park.
I wish to make it clear that I am very much in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore.
These elk are a sub-species that exists only in California. America, and especially California, has an international obligation, therefore, to look after these elk and make sure that their population is viable and thriving.
They were reintroduced to the area in 1978 and their conservation since then can be considered a success story. This is great.
I am therefore, dismayed at any possibility of them being fenced in, sterilised, shot or killed in any way or otherwise removed from the park.
Tule elk are a vital part of the ecosystem at Point Reyes.
I am absolutely SHOCKED that the Park is even considering compromising this population of elk at the behest of private corporate interests. It is unbelievable that farmers can just graze their cattle on land that is meant to be for the public and for wildlife.
If people want to farm cattle, they should get their own land and do it there. They have no business putting their privately owned livestock onto wilderness areas and especially no business in asking or expecting, the local, rare, internationally important wildlife to be killed or reduced in number just to satisfy their bottom lines.
I also request that you to reject any conversion of national park lands to crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens, pigs or any other farming animal onto a wilderness area where they have no business to be.
Farms are for livestock. Wilderness areas and national parks are for wild animals.
I have never heard such nonsense that farmers can just let their animals wander about loose in the wild. Crazy idea.
Will you please see sense and keep the national park for national animals.
Thank you.
___________________________
# 2204
Name: Bannister, Julie M
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the inatural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
___________________________
# 2205
Name: Petelle, Dany M
Correspondence: Hello,
Please do not kill the Elk. Please search your heart and find a different alternative then just going to a mass slaughter of innocent animals that are just living their lives. We are so lucky and to share this earth amongst our fellow creatures with all their beauty and awe.. At this rate there will not be any. They have every right to be on this earth as we do. It is their only life. They have families and feel happy and sad and care enjoy just like we do. Let's help change this world. If we all contribute and thrive to be kinder, we can make a difference.
Thank you for taking the time to read this,
Sincerely,
Dany Petelle
___________________________
# 2206
Name: Sherry , Marybeth
Correspondence: Let the elk and wild life live in peace. If need sterilize to keep herd down.
___________________________
# 2207
Name: Bumbesti, Lea
Correspondence: Please do not kill the Tule Elk. They are allowed to live on the land too. One of my favorite things about driving out to point Reyes is being able to see the wild life that lives there. That includes seeing the elk. Don't slaughter the local wildlife just because ranchers want more land. Preserve the local wildlife please. Thank you for your time.
___________________________
# 2208
Name: Williams, Terrie C
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
___________________________
# 2209
Name: Williams, Terrie C
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
___________________________
# 2210
Name: Williams, Terrie C
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
___________________________
# 2211
Name: Williams, Terrie C
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
___________________________
# 2212
Name: Williams, Terrie C
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
___________________________
# 2213
Name: Williams, Terrie C
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
___________________________
# 2214
Name: Williams, Terrie C
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
___________________________
# 2215
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: Please do not kill any elks! If "management" is necessary then use non-lethal options only!
___________________________
# 2216
Name: Hansen, Corrie
Correspondence: Hello,
Please, please do not allow the billion dollar beef industry to take more lives and land. Please do not allow the slaughter of the Point Reyes Elk. Please fight for biodiversity, all we will be left with is cows, pigs, and chickens at this rate. Please do not allow the slaughter of Point Reyes Elk.
Thank you and very sincerely,
Corrie Hansen
___________________________
# 2217
Name: Russell, James A
Correspondence: As a recent visitor to a ranch in the park, I observed the care and respect the ranch owners had for the park and the ranch animals within the park. I understand their anxiety over the coming leases and feel they are good as stewards of the land, and as such, should have the stability of a 20 year lease. I feel that the elk would fare better in the wilderness.
___________________________
# 2218
Name: Mathison, Barbara J
Correspondence: Do not kill or cage these incredible animals. Set up designated feeding and drinking areas that are safe and away from population. That is the least we can do since humans have taken away their home lands.
Thankyou
___________________________
# 2219
Name: Poznak, Nancy S
Correspondence: Please do not "manage" - killl- any wild animals to make way for ranching or any other unnecessary reason. We should be working towards greatly reducing ranching. It's senseless cruelty. Animal agriculture contributes over half of all environmental destruction and we don’t really need to eat animals. Every major health & nutrition organization supports the superior health benefits of plant-sourced nutrition.
___________________________
# 2220
Name: Hansen, John
Correspondence: This is a terrible idea. Please leave the elk (and all other animals) alone. Meat and dairy are dying industries that no one will respect or desire in a few years time. Animals are here with us, not for us. Have some respect. As a tax-paying Californian, I urge you not to go through with this.
___________________________
# 2221
Name: schinner, seraphina a
Correspondence: Please do not "manage" the elk. This is incredibly unsustainable in the long run, as ranching on a large scale is completely unsustainable in terms of not only water usage, but land usage as well.
___________________________
# 2222
Name: N/A, Tristan
Correspondence: I oppose the option to eliminate ranching in the park. I support the continuation of sustainable agricultural within the park.
Ranching is part of the rich history of West Marin. The land management practices we see in the park are far better than other parts of the country. There is always room for improvement. An up to date EIS would be helpful to move forward in the planning process.
As someone who hikes in the park nearly every day, I adore the cattle as much as the wildlife.
Eliminating ranching in the park would negatively impact the local food shed, job market and school enrollment. This is a small community with a housing crisis and limited job opportunities. If the ranchers had to leave the park, they would likely have to leave the community.
The park is already overrun with tourists. There is no need to expand the trail system or increase recreation opportunities until the park can manage the illegal parking at popular trail heads and the heaps of toilet paper and garbage that line the forest on busy trails.
Please withhold my personally identifiable information from public view.
Tristan
___________________________
# 2223
Name: Halpin, Atalie T
Correspondence: Dear National Parks People,
Please continue to protect our native wildlife, specifically the wild elk at Point Reyes. As a native of the Sonoma coast area myself,I care deeply for the preservation of these animals for future generations. Elk of Northern California are a key part of our ecosystem and should not be eliminated for the greedy desires of cattle farmers. Protecting wild animals and spaces is the civic duty of the national parks. Please do not give in to the desires of ranchers who care only about their own abilities to make money off of grass fed beef.
Sincerely,
Atalie Tate
___________________________
# 2224
Name: N/A, Dani
Correspondence: Hello NPS,
I am simply writing to ask kindly to please protect the animals who depend on you.
I have heard of the beef industry trying to get more grazing land but we shouldn't give into their demands.
There is nothing sustainable about raising cows for human consumption.
It is depleting our resources and now other species we share the world with.
I was born and raised in California; it is a beautiful state with other animals who call it their home too.
The Point Reyes elk need their home and need your protection more than ever.
Please. Don't kill them. They are beautiful animals that deserve the right to life like all of us.
We might not even realize how valuable other life is on this planet until it's too late.
Sincerely,
Dani
___________________________
# 2225
Name: Campbell , Shannon
Correspondence: The slaughtering of native animals for the "protection" of grazing agricultural animals is by no means a solution to this problem. This practice is the opposite of sustainable as native animals control grazing land the way it is supposed to be managed. Cattle under the supervision of ranchers should rather be enclosed in fences if they are competing with native animals. I am completely ashamed and dissapointed in the organization and government that would allow such an idiotic practice to be allowed.
___________________________
# 2226
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: Please let the land return to it's normal state with minimal management.
And please do not manage the Tule Elk by killing them.
Thank you for listening.
___________________________
# 2227
Name: Hazelhofer, Galen
Correspondence: Point Reyes National Seashore and the fate of the Tule elk and ranching - Please do not manage - kill- any natural wild animals to make way for any unnatural ranching animals that ruin the environment due to their grazing habits and digestion systems (seeds are destroyed in their systems) they don't redistribute natural plant seed like the wildlife do (seeds pass through their systems and are replanted) - or for any other unnecessary reason.
Cattle also tend to pull up the natural plants instead of biting them off so they cause destruction to the natural habitat that the natural wildlife don't do! The natural environment will be trampled and ruined by cattle grazing! Keep them OFF of the Point Reyes Nations Seashore!
And ranching is senseless cruelty. In a world where a plant-based diet is gaining popularity due to the health aspects for one, and the fact that animal agriculture contributes to over half of all environmental destruction and contributes 51% to climate change, we we should not be eating animals. People are realizing that there is no humane animal agriculture or humane slaughter and are choosing to forgo animal-based meals. Every major health & nutrition organization supports the superior health benefits of plant-sourced nutrition.
It's time to protect ALL wildlife and their environments and stop the human encroachment into their rightful habitat.
Thank you.
___________________________
# 2228
Name: Harker, Jana
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
___________________________
# 2229
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: I am writing to request the NPS protect the Tule Elk. We need to protect our natural resources for our future generations. Unfortunately the human population is expanding at a rate the infringes on wildlife but it is my opinion that the best choice is to protect wildlife and stand up for the voiceless.
Thank you.
Patricia
___________________________
# 2230
Name: Baum, Oliver
Correspondence: My daughter and I visited the park this year in August. We spent 3 days there and it was amazing. We visited a lot of parks on this trip but we never saw so many animals. So many
birds (I can't remember all the names), owls, bobcats, elks, ... .
The park is so special because of the animals living there and is not that crowded like other parks - so the animals are less disturbed.
The idea of row crops and new commercial animal farming should be scrapped. The country is so big, it is not necessary to use land of state parks for commercial purpose.
In Germany where we live animals especially insects are gone because of using the land in monoculture and for commercial purpose.
Best regards from Germany
Oliver
___________________________
# 2231
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
___________________________
# 2232
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely, Kelly Lund.
___________________________
# 2233
Name: Konova, Elena K
Correspondence: I am politely asking you to protect the rights of the Point Reyes elk as this would be not only unethical, but also might endanger other local animal populations as we know that all of them are connected in many aspects. Thank you very much for listening.
___________________________
# 2234
Name: Hearn , Amber R
Correspondence: Don't have anymore land removed for agriculture protect the wildlife
___________________________
# 2235
Name: Ensign, Dianne
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I'm a lifelong environmentalist dedicated to protecting the earth, and I strongly support the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore. I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
Wildlife play an irreplaceable role in sustaining the ecosystem, and there is an essential need for non-lethal co-existence with wildlife. The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
___________________________
# 2236
Name: Nicholas, Jonathan
Correspondence: Do not "manage" the Tule elk. They have more of a right to be there than livestock.
Thank you.
___________________________
# 2237
Name: Emm, Lin F
Correspondence: Re: Point Reyes National Seashore, the Tule elk and ranching
Please do not kill any natural wild animals to accommodate ranching animals, which ruin the environment due to their grazing habits and digestive systems. Seeds are destroyed by cattle ingestion, thus they do not redistribute natural plant seed as indigenous animals do. Seeds pass through the Tule elks and other wildlifess systems to be replanted, just as nature intended. Cattle also tend to pull up the natural plants instead of biting them off, so they cause destruction to the natural habitat. Simply put, the natural environment will be trampled and ruined by cattle grazing. The Point Reyes Nations Seashore is a national treasure that needs to be preserved. We want our children and grandchildren to enjoy the natural scenery-including its precious animal life.
On a global level, animal agriculture contributes to over half of all environmental destruction and contributes 51% to climate change. It simply is not sustainable. Please allow the ranchers leases to expire and return the land to its original purpose-to delight Marin
residents and visitors alike. It's time to protect ALL wildlife and their environments and stop the human encroachment into their rightful habitat.
Thank you,
Lin Ferrell Emm
___________________________
# 2238
Name: Ewing, Roger
Correspondence: Killing wild elk to accommodate cattle ranchers is a true travesty. Let the cattle ranchers purchase hay to feed their soon to be slaughtered beef cattle. Show some mercy. Please!
___________________________
# 2239
Name: Obacz, Sara
Correspondence: I fully object with the use of elk in the meat industry. Stop taking wild animals out of the wild!
___________________________
# 2240
Name: Domich, Hailey E
Correspondence: Please protect the Point Reyes Elk. We the public are against the killing of the Point Reyes Elk. If any animal should be removed from the Point Reyes National Seashore it should be the non-native and extremely invasive cattle. The national park service was created to preserve and protect wildlife, not to preserve and protect the interests of the beef industry.
___________________________
# 2241
Name: Hampton, Lisa
Correspondence: I grew up eating meat bc I didn't know any better. I have now come to realize after choosing not to eat meat the past 14 years that animals deserve to live. Treat them with kindness. They serve a purpose in this world so let nature take its natural course and leave them be
___________________________
# 2242
Name: Hayes, James A
Correspondence: Park lands do not belong to ranchers. These lands belong to the American people to enjoy wildlife and unspoiled wilderness. Protect the tule elk!
___________________________
# 2243
Name: pappas, taylor
Correspondence: Please do not kill these beautiful animals for supposedly interfering with the cattle grazing areas. This is their natural habitat and like all animals, they have a purpose in their ecosystem. It is also not fair to push them out of their habitat due to human activities. Many animals already face enough suffering at the hands of humans, I urge you not to do continue this trend with this beautiful species.
Thank you
___________________________
# 2244
Name: Makuch, Nick
Correspondence: The meat industry is the leading cause of global warming and should be considered when making this decision. Please don't allow these elk to be killed just so cattle can graze on the land. Animals have just as much of a right to be here as we do.
Warm Regards,
Nick
___________________________
# 2245
Name: Petzak, Jamaka N
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing as a proud second-generation Californian in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are a beautiful and important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the stated and traditional mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders and other special interest groups on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. These are OUR lands, not those of private special interest groups such as ranchers. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore. This is consistent with the views and values of the vast majority of the public whose lands these are and should remain in perpetuity.
___________________________
# 2246
Name: Greene, Marisa T
Correspondence: I am against the killing of the Point Reyes elk. If any animal should be removed from the Point Reyes National Seashore, it is the non-native invasive cattle. The National Park Service was created to preserve and protect wildlife, not to cater to the interests of the beef industry. Preserving and protecting wildlife and the environment does not go hand in hand with meat (especially beef) production. The amount of water that is wasted and polluted, and the amount of land and air that is polluted by the beef industry is sickening. I encourage you to look up the scary statistics regarding pollution and water usage in the beef industry. Please stand with the public in their wishes to protect wildlife.
___________________________
# 2247
Name: Foley , Patricia
Correspondence:
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Patricia Foley
___________________________
# 2248
Name: Moulton, Chandelle M
Correspondence: To whom it may concern,
Please refrain from culling the indigenous animals for the already wavering agriculture industry. Can't we learn from our past mistakes and move on? Culling has been happening around the world for ages and forced many animals into extinction. God gave us these creatures for companionship and beauty and explicitly says we should not treat then unjust or cruelly.
Live and let live, what would your 5 year old self think?
We are all born compassionate we learn to be cruel.
___________________________
# 2249
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: I support the continuation of sustainable agriculture in the Seashore and GGNRA.
___________________________
# 2250
Name: Sadowskas, Bruce E
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Bruce E. Sadowskas
___________________________
# 2251
Name: Aptekar, Judy
Correspondence: The combination of open space and sustainable agriculture is what makes Point Reyes such a unique and special place. This combination is working beautifully and should not be changed.
___________________________
# 2252
Name: Sadowskas, Bonnie
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Bonnie M. Sadowskas
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# 2253
Name: Thom, Michael P
Correspondence: I support "no change" in Ranching and management of the Tule Elk. I.e I support the NPS initil proposal.
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# 2254
Name: Sauve, Jim
Correspondence: To whom it may concern;
I support the continuation of sustainable agriculture in the Seashore and GGNRA.
Sincerely,
Jim Sauve
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# 2255
Name: Graves, Caryn R
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Caryn Graves
___________________________
# 2256
Name: Lansing, Jim C
Correspondence: I understand there are six alternatives being considered for the General Management Plan Amendment for the Point Reyes National Seashore and the north district of the Golden Gate National Recreation Area.
I strongly support Continuing the Current Management (No Action) as it seems to be working fine. I visit both the Point Reyes National Seashore and north district of the Golden Gate National Recreation Area regularly. In regards to the National Seashore, I understand that ranchers may object to the presence of Tule Elk but I have not seen so many of them while there to even consider that they are currently a problem. Of course there needs to be a balance, but the current balance seems to be working. Why fix something that doesn't need fixing?
As to the north district of the GG National Recreation Area, I find that the current relatively small-size agriculture stewards of the land are doing a good job, not only in preserving the land for future generations as open space and providing habitat for endangered species but also in giving the Bay Area much valued organic food products in the bargain.
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# 2257
Name: Naidu, Soumya
Correspondence: I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Soumya Naidu
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# 2258
Name: Ilardi, Robert & Virginia
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,B
___________________________
# 2259
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: I strongly support sustainable agriculture in the Point Reyes National Seashore. The historic cattle ranches are very much part of the Marin economy and are a scenic asset. There are plenty of existing trails for hikers and many of them are little used. (I went on a six-mile hike last week and did not meet a soul.)
support the ranchers by extending their leases at least 20 years.
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# 2260
Name: Noble, Janet L
Correspondence: I support the vision of MALT - - and agree that ranching operations should be allowed to continue.
Thank you,
Janet Noble
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# 2261
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: I think it is absurd that there is even a question of whether or not ranchers should be allowed to continue in their livelihood on land that they gave to the parks with the understanding that they would be ranching their land indefinitely. I would like to see continued Ranching of both Beef and Dairy Ranches with 20 year renewable lease/permits forever. I would also like to see removal of ALL Tule ELK off All Ranches with Tule Elk being placed back in Limantour/Phillip Burton Wilderness Area. Again, I can't believe that there is any question about what the right thing to do is.
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# 2262
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: As a resident and property owner in Marin County for almost 50 years, my family has long been committed to the treasure of this land. I wish to convey my strong support for the ranches and ranchers of West Marin, and believe it is vital they should not only exist and be protected forever, but that the ranchers also deserve the respect of long term leases. It is because of these historic ranches that we have the beautiful open spaces of West Marin. The ranchers have been stewards of the land for over a hundred years, and I give them my full support and gratitude. We need them!: to teach future generations respect for open space and agriculture; to provide sustainable local agriculture for all of us to enjoy; to provide jobs for dedicated ranch workers.... I could go on and on...
As for the tule elk... I could be ambivalent... if they were moved elsewhere, it would be fine with me... It is the protection of the ranches and the ranchers that I care about.
Please vote to support West Marin ranches and ranchers in every possible way, with long-term (at the least 20 year) leases.
Thank you.
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# 2263
Name: Bullock, Jennifer
Correspondence: I would like to see "all" ranchers in the Point Reyes National Seashore (beef, dairy, other) continue ranching and to receive 20 year leases. This will help ranchers continue to provide quality products locally and far.
All roaming Tule elk on ranches need to be placed back in the Limantour wilderness and kept there. These elk should also have sufficient forage and water in their wilderness habitat. This will help with fire prevention.
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# 2264
Name: A., susan
Correspondence: As a Marin County resident, I support NPS to CONTINUE CURRENT MANAGEMENT. On many occasions I have observed the Tule Elk herd thriving around Point Reyes area, and local deer herds coexisting with sustainable agriculture. I see how Marin Agricultural Land Trust works with local farms and herders to support sustainable practices. Please continue . Keep up the good work.
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# 2265
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: Greetings!
The NPS should provide Continued Ranching of both Beef and Dairy Ranches with 20 year renewable lease/permits. The NPS should remove all Tule Elk off All Ranches and Place Tule Elk back in Limantour/Phillip Burton Wilderness Area set aside for them according to the 1998 Point Reyes National Seashore Tule Elk Management Plan and Environmental Assessment. Alternative A was chosen by the public to place Tule Elk in the Limantour Wilderness area, managed and kept off ranches. These Tule elk should live in a wilderness area where they are eating natural forage and not cattle's hay and being hazed/chased through livestock fencing by park staff.
West Marin is a critical, ground breaking historical are for agriculture which should be allowed to live and exist side by side with the natural entities that predate them.
Thank You.
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# 2266
Name: N/A, Amanda
Correspondence: Please do not give in to the industry. Let's remember it's our job to protect those that are unable to protect themselves.
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# 2267
Name: Darley, Mark C
Correspondence: It is essential that historic and sustainable reaching continue in Point Reyes National Seashore.
The continuation of sustainable agriculture on Point Reyes National Seashore (Seashore) and Golden Gate National Recreation Area (GGNRA) directly affects our community's ability to permanently protect Marin’s agricultural land for agricultural use. I unequivocally support the continuation of sustainable farming and ranching in these areas. Together, they represent nearly a fifth of Marin County’s agricultural acreage and production. If these agricultural operations disappear, we face losing the critical mass necessary to sustain suppliers, processors and other services crucial to the future of agriculture countywide in Marin.
If you kick out the ranchers from Point Reyes National Seashore we will lose most of not all of our dairy and much of our beef ranching in our county. Our meat and dairy will then be unsustainably trucked in from other parts of California with significant environmental consequences, and there will be significant loss of work in our agricultural communities.
The Point Reyes landscape has been managed by Native American people long before the Western farmers arrived. The Pomo and Ohlone peoples burned and cleared forest regularly to create the meadows the current farmers Ranch. Moving cattle of the land will result in loss of bird life and huge fire risk to our community as non native shrubs take over. Practically speaking we need cattle to graze the land and we need the dairy and beef locally produced.
Keep ranching in Point Reyes National Seashore.
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# 2268
Name: Scott, Paul B
Correspondence: Dear National Park Service Representative.
I want to encourage the Park Service to make a concerted effort to continue supporting the tradition of sustainable, organic ranching on the Point Reyes National Seashore. I am a veteran educator, with nearly 20 years experience in Bay Area classrooms and I have brought many class trips out to the Seashore specifically to experience the amazing synergy between environmental activism, family farming, and ecological beauty that is characteristic of the Seashore and nearly unique in California. I am a longtime member of the Marin Agricultural Land Trust and have enormous respect for all that the organization has done to support environmental stewardship and sustainable agriculture in the area.
Please help protect the long term viability of ranching on the Seashore.
Sincerely,
Paul Scott
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# 2269
Name: Pinto, Jean P
Correspondence: I'm for no ranching and limited management of Tule Elk
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# 2270
Name: Seymour, Susan C
Correspondence: My husband and I strongly support the current amount of ranching/farming in Pt. Reyes National Seashore. We do not want to see it curtailed in any way. Please keep ranching alive and well.
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# 2271
Name: KAYNER, KATHY D
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
When I visit Point Reyes National Seashore, I look forward to seeing native wildlife and plants to photograph. Limiting the Tule Elk or removing them so non native livestock and crops can take hold is just wrong for a National Park.
Sincerely,
Kathy Kayner
___________________________
# 2272
Name: Oda , John
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely, John and Jazzmyne Oda
___________________________
# 2273
Name: Moore, Tad
Correspondence: Both private ranching and the long term viability of the existing elk herd are very important to the success of the Point Reyes area. I strongly urge you to support both ranching and wildlife.
Tad Moore
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# 2274
Name: Christensen, Joan
Correspondence: I am strongly opposed to running off, fencing, sterilization or killing Thule Elk in 18,000 acres of Point Reyes National Seashore in order to allow cattle into this area. Point Reyes is a national park and these elk are found only in this area. They were at one time endangered and have now recovered They belong there, cattle do not. I am opposed to cattle operations on public lands, but if it is allowed, it should not be to the exclusion of native species. National Parks' primary purpose is preservation. The cattle industry should not be taking precedence over that mission. Cattle operations must not harm native species or their habitat.
Further I am opposed to planting row crops or introducing other domesticated livestock, as they change and damage the habitat and change the predator-prey equation. It would likely lead commercial to kill off predators like coyotes and bobcats if they threatened their livestock. These operations would remove these areas from public access as well.
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# 2275
Name: Brown, Beverly L
Correspondence: I strongly support continuation of ranching and farming in the Point Reyes National Park area. If it were not for the ranchers, the would not have been created. They contribute much to the economy of Marin County as well as improving the quality of life for all of us by the food that is produced there.
It would be a great loss if these ranchers and farmers were forced off their land. I sincerely hope that there can be a way that preserves ranching and farming in this historic area.
Sincerely,
Beverly Brown
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# 2276
Name: Evans, Susan
Correspondence:
As resident of West Marin for 35 years, I have come to understand that one of the main factors that makes this a unique area is the existence of ranching in the Pt Reyes National Seashore and GGNRA. The partnership between farming and the park lands is essential to the continued existence of Pt Reyes. In fact, the park would not exist if not for the support of these same family farmers, who have been an integral part of the history and environment of Marin county for over 100 years, or longer.
farmers are real stewards of the land, and increasingly strive to maintain their farms in a way that benefits the habitat, of wild animals, birds and native plants, as well as cultivated species. Forcing these farms to abandon their work would not benefit anyone, especially the people who flock to our parklands. Local residents overwhelming support the continuation of farming here, and the critics are people who either do not live here and/or do not understand ranching practices, and do not perceive the unique advantage that the parks and farms partnership provide us all.
The issue of the Drakes Beach tule elk is really just a red herring. The farms have actually promoted their increase as the natural predators have decreased. In fact, the size of the herd and continued population growth is the real problem for the elk, not the farms per se.
I urge the Park Service to do the right thing and continue this unique partnership with the ranches. And in fact, to extend the lease period to at least ten years so that ranchers can plan ahead and do even more sustainable practices, like carbon sequestration, increasing native habitat and providing food and employment for many of us. We are truly fortunate that we can consume locally grown and produced plant and animal products, as well as exporting them to other parts of the USA and abroad.
Thank you for considering the remarks of a local resident who has spent many hours enjoying the Pt Reyes National Seashore, and hopes to do so for many years to come.
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# 2277
Name: Lerer, Sarah Cameron C
Correspondence: Ranching is not only historically part of the Point Reyes Peninsula, its continuation there was explicitly provided for in the protection of these lands as part of the National Seashore, hence the creation, acknowledgement, and continuation of a "Pastoral Zone" within the Seashore's boundaries.
Rather than repeating the benefits that continuing ranching in the Seashore, I will just say that I agree completely with the analysis of the Marin Agricultural Land Trust as to both the economic benefits and the ecological benefits of ranching in the Seashore, as it laid them out in its newsletter and on its website at www.malt.org/news/ranching-in-the-seashore.
On a more personal note, I have visited the Seashore regularly for the 3 decades I have lived surrounded by it. One of the sorriest changes I have seen is the loss of the views from the top of Mount Wittenberg as the formerly grazed grasslands were taken over by high brush.
I would hate to see all the open grasslands thus turn into masses of coyote brush with only narrow trails to walk rather than meadows to wander in.
Please allow ranching to continue, and not only to continue, but to be recognized formally, again, as a key component of the Seashore, and as the raison d'etre of the Pastoral Zone.
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# 2278
Name: Frame, Lynne H
Correspondence: As a property owner in nearby Inverness, and a concerned citizen of Marin County and California, I write to strongly support the NPS "initial proposal" to allow continued ranching and to manage the Tule elk herd as an amendment to the General Plan for Point Reyes National Seashore.
My position arises out of numerous concerns and interests, including:
- preserving the economic and environmental benefits of a robust agricultural infrastructure and local food supply in West Marin. A reduction in already minimal ranching activities threatens the economic viability of ranching and farming both on the Pt Reyes peninsula and in greater West Marin.
- preservation of the native flora, which have been shown to benefit from long-established grazing practices
- encouraging cooperation and support of park policies from the surrounding community by upholding the spirit and intent of the park's founders, who agreed that ranching is an integral aspect of the Pt. Reyes heritage and committed to allowing its successful continuation
Put simply, the ranches of Pt. Reyes are integral to the economic vitality of the surrounding community, to the environmental health of the park lands, and to the heritage preservation mission of the National Park Service. In the national context, the PRNS makes a crucial contribution to the experience of visitors and citizens afar by demonstrating that conservation-oriented human activity and preservation of our natural resources can and do go hand in hand- -as they have for centuries on the Pt Reyes peninsula.
Respectfully submitted,
Lynne Frame
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# 2279
Name: N/A, Julien
Correspondence: Please , let these animals be safe from harm. Let them live, that is why they were born and no industry or (wo)man should interfere with life. Profit and cruelty are what poisons our minds, our lives and our very own world... This needs to stop. Respect and love are inifnitely more essential and vital. Thank you.
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# 2280
Name: Ness, Inge
Correspondence: These elk have made a remarkable recovery and now you want to get rid of them again because that's exactly what it sounds like they have every right to live here just as we do and we have no right to decide what lives and dies
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# 2281
Name: Geier, Eric
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Eric Geier
___________________________
# 2282
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: Please do not manage the elk!
___________________________
# 2283
Name: lutz, ashley
Correspondence: let them live!
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# 2284
Name: Christoff, Stephanie
Correspondence: Please protect elk in the National Parks. All animals deserve to live and thrive in their natural environment with protection against human hunting.
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# 2285
Name: Schinner, Miyoko
Correspondence: I plead with the park services to consider the impact of ranching on the environment for years to come and adopt the first alternative, which would be to cease all ranching activities on public land and allow the Tule elk to live.
Contrary to agricultural interests and the romantic notion of the rotational grazing movement in Marin (Marin Carbon Project, etc.), there is virtually no science to back this up. A recent international study of environmental organizations lead by Oxford University found that, in reviewing hundreds of studies, that there is no benefit whatsoever to climate change mitigation through grazing; in fact, it was found to be more harmfulthan helpful. See http://www.fcrn.org.uk/sites/default/files/project-files/fcrn_gnc_report.pdf.
In the United States alone, due to activities of the USDA's Wildlife Services and Park Services, we have already obliterated over 60% of all wildlife in order to allow for ranching across vast tracts of public land. The longterm impacts of this invasive species (cattle, not indigenous or necessary) are not understood, but all indicators show that the over 100 million cows in this country occupying almost half of the country are severely impacting climate change. When we remove other "nuisance" species, such as deer, elk, coyotes, wolves, birds, etc. in order to maintain forage for cows, we upset the natural balance and cannot anticipate the longterm impacts on the whole of the environment.
We don't need cows for food, and certainly free range beef does nothing to reduce global food security when it accounts for less than 1% of all protein intakes. It is a "solution" for the elite only. As forward-thinking Marinites, we need to start taking responsibility for our lands and thinking of how we can not only preserve them for generations to come but how they might be an actual solution to the impending global food crisis.
It's easy to get caught up in the notion of supporting agricultural interests that have been around since the 1800's. The coal industry has also been around for as long, but we see now that that is not sustainable. Continuing a practice that supports a handful of families at the cost of the environment is not a choice that an enlightened county should be making. Environmentalists here often cite the fact that the white deer and Tule elk are not indigenous to this land - - but are cows? Why do we favor one species over another? It all leads back to economic interests, not environmental ones.
We must begin to take a global approach to the activities of a few, and consider the impacts it has.
Miyoko Schinner
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# 2286
Name: Chong, Alexia J
Correspondence: Hello, im leaving a comment inhopes that The National Park does not allow the Beef industry to hunt the Elk. Native to the land, the animals shouldnt be hunted and killed by a mass meat industry. The hunting of the Elk would throw off the balance and greatly diminish the food for carnivores who feed on the Elk naturally.
Please dont allow the Elks to be hunted and killed.
Thank you.
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# 2287
Name: Baltz, Ruhee
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
These creatures have a right to be here - it is their home. Even though I live in England, I have visited the U.S and a big draw is to see the wildlife and also to know that wildlife is valued. People of the world want to see wildlife and we want to see them in their natural habitat and to be protected for future generations!
___________________________
# 2288
Name: Allen, Kathleen
Correspondence: I hope that the NPS will honor the original intention to maintain and keep all agricultural activities alive and well within the Point Reyes National Seashore. To do otherwise it is a slap in the face for everything that so many have worked so hard for since the 1970s.
Please keep ranching alive in the PRNS. As a resident of the area for 22 years it was one of the best parts of the park, it set it apart from parks and it worked well. Otherwise, the NPS comes off looking like bullies kicking families and ranchers off of farms they worked for generations. Agriculture is critical to the stability of the area. Without it your just another tourist trap.
___________________________
# 2289
Name: Pearson, Caryl
Correspondence: To "eliminate" the elk would be a CRIME.
___________________________
# 2290
Name: Lewis, Sammarye M
Correspondence: The Tule Elk have always been this land and it is theirs to live and survive on. They are an iconic image of Pt. Reyes and a huge tourist attraction. Cattle ranchers have taken over more and more of their grazing habitat, and have fenced the elk off from food and water. This is disgraceful, and many elk have died from deliberate human impact.
You are National PARK Service, not national dairy ranchers service. Our national parks belong to the citizens and taxpayers, not to dairy ranchers who are land grabbing for a dying industry. We, the people, want our Tule Elk to remain on their native land and not be displaced or destroyed for the benefit of the dairy industry. Neither corporate dollars nor small business dollars should have a voice in your decision - this is the People speaking and we want our Tule Elk in this habitat, undisturbed and herds intact.
___________________________
# 2291
Name: Rose, Andrea
Correspondence: Dear NPS,
I am not a resident of California at the moment, but my non-profit is is the process of gettiing registered there.
I have been to the Point Reyes Seashore and fell in love with the area. I cannot imagine that ranching interests are receiving priority over future generations that will not have a retreat to enjoy. Ranching causes soil erosion, water pollution and the methane that the cattle produce undeniably is contributing to climate change.
The elk that live there, as well as the other native wildlife also need to be preserved for future generations. I, for one, do not want my children and grandchildren to grow up in a concrete and artificial world devoid of any natural and untouched areas to explore.
These magnificent areas help to bring us back to our roots of being human.
Thank you for taking the time to read my comments.
Andrea Rose
___________________________
# 2292
Name: Dyett, Michael V
Correspondence: Dear Ms. MacLeod,
I am writing in support of a balanced approach to management and so favor the Continued Ranching and Management of the Tule Elk Herd or as an alternative, some reduction in ranching intensity, with performance standards to ensure habitat protection and sustainable agriculture. MALT is a thoughtful organization and I support their position and input, as a practicing urban and regional planner with 40 years experience and as a Marin County resident.
Your consideration of my comments is appreciated.
Cordially,
Michael V. Dyett FAICP
Founder
www.dyettandbhatia.com
___________________________
# 2293
Name: Sanders, Moya N
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Moya Sanders, citizen
___________________________
# 2294
Name: Storm , Bonnie A
Correspondence: There are so few places remaining in California that have the biodiversity of Pt. Reyes. Please do not destroy this valuable, and treasured, area for any reason. Thank you.
___________________________
# 2295
Name: Wood, Mary Arden
Correspondence:
Please allow the ranching on the Point Reyes Peninsula to continue-this has been the historical non-invasive use of the point and, not only does it sustain local families and their heritage, but it is a means of keeping the open space in use and yet still able to be enjoyed by all.To pretend that we can create wilderness by eliminating the ranches is not a real possibility-a fantasy. I do believe that there should be strict management of the elk herds so that the cattle have adequate feed and the herds do not become overpopulated and unhealthy.
___________________________
# 2296
Name: Fox-Davis, Janis
Correspondence: 94547 As a 30 year resident of the Bay Area, my family and I have spent many magical weeks in the company of the wildlife of the Point Reyes Golden Gate National Seashore. It is here, we have taught our children to appreciate and coexist with the natural world. To hear you are considering destroying the Tule Elk or ANY of the natural inhabitants of this unique, priceless environment makes me angry and heartbroken! When will government agencies we assign with protecting our parks remember that they serve the interests of the public, NOT the ranching industries?! We do not support providing grazelands for cattle over the rights of our children to inherit the same diverse natural environment we have loved. We do not OWN the Earth!! It is a gift from God. Since white men landed on the Eastern shores, they have used weapons and money to destroy the indigenous populations of America. Now this war of the last 400 years has reached the last vestiges of the Western shores. As a voting citizen,a California , a nurse, and a grandmother, I say ENOUGH and NO to this plan. I know the beloved ancestors and the generations to come, and even God above if you dare to believe, will bring an end to the travail now visiting the natural world. May our blood and tears wash this scourge of greed and death from our lands ..amen. God save our majestic elk, the true kings of Point Reyes, as they move in the mists seeking only to live in the place made for them. Janis Fox-Davis
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# 2297
Name: ronan, james d
Correspondence: Having spent years living in CA and enjoying this NP I am strongly opposed to NPS managing the elk heard by culling it for the explicit benefit of grazing cattle on park lands. Please reconsider this and do not implement.
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# 2298
Name: Baldwin, John
Correspondence: I have grown up and lived in Marin for 68 years and I know that if it weren't for the ranchers there would be no Pt. Reyes National Seashore. I support continued ranching in Pt. Reyes National Seashore and so should the Park Service. Some of these ranchers have been here for generations. They have been good stewards of the land. Support the ranchers. Thank you. John Baldwin
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# 2299
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: I support a GMP that allows for ongoing sustainable agriculture in the Seashore and GGNRA.
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# 2300
Name: Middlesworth , Linda J
Correspondence: Removing and killing the wildlife like deer, coyotes, etc. is inherently wrong! I have almost 4,000 members and we want the park service to sop the killing now!
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# 2301
Name: Fischer, Amy
Correspondence: The public land inside Point Reyes National Seashore should not be converted to new land uses that jeopardize wildlife and public access. Row crops will destroy animals and their habitat and degrade water quality. The public will have NO access to this land. The introduction of sheep and chickens will only create conflict with coyotes and bobcats and calls for predator control will be made. This new land use consideration should not be allowed.
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# 2302
Name: Blackburn, Jo-Ann
Correspondence:
Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Jo-Ann Blackburn
Formerly Tule Elk Docent
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# 2303
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Zoe Quinn
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# 2304
Name: Barnes, Christopher
Correspondence: Having studied the options provided in the General Management Plan for the Point Reyes ranches we support Alternative 5.
The Ranches should continue to farm as they have done in the past. The Tule Elk herd should be removed from the ranches to allow the farming to be conducted profitably without competition from elk.
Alternatives involving the ranches ceasing operations would lead to the return of invasive species, loss of the pristine views to coyote brush, and increased fire danger. In addition the loss of organic farming and associated businesses in Point Reyes would be a significant blow to the local economy and to the organic movement in general.
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# 2305
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization, or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape and ecosystem of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service. They have recently battled the CA drought without help from the NPS, including adequate water and grazing land, and the NPS has also shot at least 25. This is a beleaguered population that needs your support, not further killing.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Lease holders get very favorable rates and they use public lands at the will of the American people. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species- that's what Americans want on their public lands- not cheap rentals that abuse the land and its wildlife.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality. And once wild land is modified for agricultural use (including grazing), it can never be fully restored. It is then damaged land.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore, not ranching interests taking advantage of the beneficence of the American people.
Sincerely,
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# 2306
Name: McConnell-Wood, Sarah E
Correspondence: I am the daughter of a past P.R. National Park Service Employee, I grew up with the rancher's and have always respected their hard work and their great contribution to the communities surrounding the park.
The ranchers are an integral part of the fabric contributing to the beautiful landscapes that have become such popular visitor destinations. We must move the Elk from their pastures as they have devasted fencing, eaten and drunk alot of their water & feed and pulled the rug out from under these hardworking farmers by limiting their abilities to manage predators as well as sick and sometimes rabid wildlife. Let them do what they do best- FARM and keep the communities income stabilized, school enrollment viable and the wild elk safe from human exposure.
Our entire family who once called Point Reyes Station their "hometown" vote to:
Continue Ranching of both Beef and Dairy Ranches with 20 year renewable lease/permits & Remove ALL Tule ELK off All Ranches and Place Tule Elk back in Limantour/Phillip Burton Wilderness Area.
Thank you,
Please keep this special place healthy & prosperous!
Sarah McConnell-Wood
Past resident/ Current Vacationer
Small Business Owner
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# 2307
Name: Haveman, Jon D
Correspondence: I could not more strongly advocate for "No Ranching and Limited Management of
Elk". There is absolutely no reason to allow the encroachment of ranching into the Elk territory as it has. Restoring their ability to thrive should be the number one priority. Agriculture plays a miniscule part in Marin's economy, yet occupies many many square miles of land. There is no compelling reason to give over this land to ranching at the expense of the Elks. It will be very disheartening if Marin becomes a place that so thoroughly values ranching over wildlife that their existence is further threatened.
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# 2308
Name: Baeza, Felicia L
Correspondence: I love the Tule Elk!! I also love my National Parks but when I heard that the NPS was thinking about killing the Tule Elk or allowing Ranchers to kill the Elk if they encroached on the Ranchers property I nearly cried. I drive two hours to get to Point Reyes National Seashore and I value its beauty. I hate seeing cattle where Tule Elk and other animals should be living. Please read the following statement and consider what the negative impacts would be if the NPS moves forward with "managing" the Tule Elk.
I plead with the park services to consider the impact of ranching on the environment for years to come and adopt the first alternative, which would be to cease all ranching activities on public land and allow the Tule elk to live.
Contrary to agricultural interests and the romantic notion of the rotational grazing movement in Marin (Marin Carbon Project, etc.), there is virtually no science to back this up. A recent international study of environmental organizations lead by Oxford University found that, in reviewing hundreds of studies, that there is no benefit whatsoever to climate change mitigation through grazing; in fact, it was found to be more harmfulthan helpful. See http://www.fcrn.org.uk/.../project-files/fcrn_gnc_report.pdf.
In the United States alone, due to activities of the USDA's Wildlife Services and Park Services, we have already obliterated over 60% of all wildlife in order to allow for ranching across vast tracts of public land. The longterm impacts of this invasive species (cattle, not indigenous or necessary) are not understood, but all indicators show that the over 100 million cows in this country occupying almost half of the country are severely impacting climate change. When we remove other "nuisance" species, such as deer, elk, coyotes, wolves, birds, etc. in order to maintain forage for cows, we upset the natural balance and cannot anticipate the longterm impacts on the whole of the environment.
We don't need cows for food, and certainly free range beef does nothing to reduce global food security when it accounts for less than 1% of all protein intakes. It is a "solution" for the elite only. As forward-thinking Marinites, we need to start taking responsibility for our lands and thinking of how we can not only preserve them for generations to come but how they might be an actual solution to the impending global food crisis.
It's easy to get caught up in the notion of supporting agricultural interests that have been around since the 1800's. The coal industry has also been around for as long, but we see now that that is not sustainable. Continuing a practice that supports a handful of families at the cost of the environment is not a choice that an enlightened county should be making. Environmentalists here often cite the fact that the white deer and Tule elk are not indigenous to this land - - but are cows? Why do we favor one species over another? It all leads back to economic interests, not environmental ones.
We must begin to take a global approach to the activities of a few, and consider the impacts it has.
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# 2309
Name: Wittenkeller, Brian
Correspondence: As a San Anselmo resident since 1968 and former Chief Park and Open Space Planner for the County of Marin, I have enjoyed Point Reyes National Seashore over the years and have become quite familiar with the planning issues before us now.
I recommend the adoption of the full agricultural alternative option with the continued management of the elk herd.
Thank You for the opportunity to make my recommendation on this very important matter.
Best Regards and good Luck,
Brian Wittenkeller
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# 2310
Name: Arnold, Judy
Correspondence: November 9, 2017
Cynthia MacLeod
Acting Superintendent
Point Reyes GMP Amendment
Point Reyes National Seashore
1 Bear Valley Road
Point Reyes Station, CA 94956
Subject: County of Marin First Phase Comments on the Point Reyes National Seashore General Management Plan Amendment
Superintendent MacLeod,
Introduction
The County of Marin embraces the first phase of the General Management Plan Amendment (GMP Amendment) process for the Point Reyes National Seashore (PRNS) and north district of Golden Gate National Recreation Area (GGNRA) as a seminal opportunity, and our responsibility, to again fully partner with the National Park Service (NPS). Through our combined leadership we can secure West Marins open and connected landscape for the fundamental, integrated, and necessary role of human communities in the environment.
Marin County agriculture is recognized as a leader in Californias agricultural sustainability movement and local food security. Farming and ranching in PRNS and GGNRA contributes to the stability of our entire County of Marin farm system. Point Reyes National Seashore ranches and dairies account for nearly 20% ($20 million) of all gross agricultural production in Marin County. These ranches and dairies play a critical role in maintaining the viability of Marin County agricultural infrastructure and economic viability. Application of an Economic Input-Output Model to NPS farms and ranches would have an economic multiplier impact of nearly four (4) times the gross production values, or $80 million.
The Marin County Board of Supervisors considers it a privilege to continue the legacy of our predecessor, Peter Behr. Through his leadership and collaboration with many instrumental partners, PRNS and GGNRA came into existence. Paralleling the steps and actions taken to make this possible are Marin Countys precedent setting land use policy actions to preserve Marins complementing private agricultural lands and strategically support their viability through diversification in agricultural production in our Countywide Plan. We have put these policies in place for the same purpose and goal that there is ranching on PRNS and GGNRA - that is, to support and embrace sustainable, viable, and environmentally friendly farming that protects the land, water, and history of our agricultural community.
Accordingly, we express our full and unequivocal support for the continuation of viable livestock grazing, dairy production, and diversified agriculture on the fullest expanse of PRNS and GGNRA pastoral area. Marin is only now fully understanding and benefiting from the critical role ranchers and farmers have as partners in achieving our shared goals. In developing GMP Amendment alternatives, the farmers and ranchers role as managers should be elevated because they represent the most direct connection to and provide the management needed to maintain and enhance the pastoral cultural landscape of PRNS and GGNRA.
Specific Comments
These same local farm families have upheld for nearly 40 years (1978 Public Law 95-625) their promises to manage natural and cultural resources in a manner consistent with agricultural lease/special use permits issued and audited by PRNS. They have met detailed and specific range management program activities, terms and conditions. This includes compliance with San Francisco Regional Water Quality Control Boards water quality regulations for grazing livestock and dairy operation. Similarly, Marin County completed its Climate Action Plan Update in 2015, and Marin agricultural has demonstrated that it can be an important part of the solution to climate change through carbon farming and carbon offsets. An entire chapter was dedicated to agriculture in the Action Plan.
value the many benefits to our community that working ranches and farms provide, such as creating jobs that help sustain our rural West Marin Communities, including our schools, churches and other important organizations. ask that any considered alternatives consider all of the benefits that ranchers contribute.
The absence of clear guidance for agricultural operations hinders the decision-making ability of the rancher and NPS staff field-level relationships. The needs to repair fences, reroof barns, and manage invasive plants are a few examples of operational decisions that often are delayed. These delays have had financial and ecological impacts. Alternatives in the GMP Amendment will be stronger and have increased success in realizing the mutual benefits of working farms and ranches if they include guidelines to facilitate ranchers and NPS making real-time operational decisions. This is the operational flexibility that the field level partnership between the ranches and staff require to be successful.
Marin has enjoyed and benefited from a broad partnership of agricultural support organizations. This has included Marin County departments such as the Agricultural Department, Community Development Agency, and Cooperative Extension. Federal agencies such as the United States Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service and the National Organic Program are integral to this partnership. So too are community based organizations like the Agricultural Institute of Marin, Marin Agricultural Land Trust, and Marin Resource Conservation District. This partnership has provided the combined complementing missions and expertise in land use policy, agricultural and natural resource management, marketing and outreach, and education to accomplish precedent setting land conservation, environmental stewardship projects, and value-added farm production. PRNS and GGNRA Staff have been collaborators and partners on these innovations and accomplishments. To replicate these successes, we recommend that considered alternatives provide for the inclusion and enhancement of this partnership and its ability to implement integrated farm production and environmental stewardship solutions. Succession is critical for the perpetuity of agricultures management and stewardship contributions. Marin has benefited from successful transition from one generation to the next through as many as five family generations. Additionally, hand-offs of agricultural property and operations to non-family members have gone successfully with agricultural production and environmental stewardship persisting. We hold successful succession from current to future agriculturalists fundamental for the continuation of Marins valued pastoral landscapes. Because of this, we recommend that any alternatives have a plan for succession to new members of existing farm families and alternative agricultural candidates if that option is not presented.
is a proven tool for the economic viability of both individual ranches and the broader community and it is a recognized and supported tenant in the Marin Countywide Plan. has enabled Marins small and medium sized farms to be economically viable, build additional resiliency, and to avert the risks of business failure. This is especially important because these ranches do not benefit from economies of scale that larger operations enjoy. In effect, diversification has strengthened Marins local family farms, local economy, and local food system. As a result, and for these reasons, diversification on the PRNS and GGNRA ranches and dairies should be fully considered in any analyzed alternative so that it can be facilitated going forward. This includes selected crop production, forage production, farm sales, farm processing, farm stays, and farm tours.
Grazing livestock and free-range elk are not compatible, evidenced by the ongoing experiences of PRNS ranches. Tule Elk are impacting ranchers. The main herd, consisting of females, juveniles, and a few males, and male bachelor groups, spend time on A Ranch, B Ranch, C Ranch, E Ranch, and the former D Ranch. Because they have migrated beyond the fenced wilderness boundary area onto ranch land, they compete for feed and water resources intended for livestock, disrupting operations, and increasing operating cost, while potentially exposing the livestock to disease pathogens (Johnes). Wilderness designated lands and Pastoral/Ranch leased lands should be given equal protection corresponding to their intended use and purpose. Wilderness Areas are intended for displaying nature and the Resources Specialist to manage, whereas the Pastoral Areas are intended to be managed for agricultural use by the rancher. There should be little allowance for commingling resource use and management styles between them. When livestock are found in Wilderness, they are removed. Likewise, when Elk are found in Pastoral Zones, management methods should be used to control their population and remove their impacts.
connections between the GMP Amendment planning area with other portions of PRNS and GGNRA and the broader region are strong. six dairies in the planning area are 20% of Marins remaining dairy farms, shipping to local dairy processers such as Straus Family Creamery and Clover Sonoma. free-range elk in the planning area originated from the herd in the adjacent Wilderness and are influenced by resource conditions there. Visitor experiences and opportunities are among the menu of options across the entire Seashore with the quality and extent of road, parking, and trail networks influencing access to these options. We ask that, beyond the minimum required of the GMP Amendment Settlement, alternative analyses make consideration of these connections and incorporate the options for solving management conflicts and improving overall experiences that exist outside the planning area.
Closure
The GMP Amendment presents an important opportunity to celebrate the outcomes and endowment resulting from decisions made more than 50 years ago. We can do this best by reaffirming our commitment to an evolved understanding of humans fundamental role in the environment, exemplified by all of Marins working ranches and farms. We stand ready with the National Park Service, PRNS and GGNRA ranchers and farmers, and Marins broader community to achieve this shared goal.
Respectfully,
Judy Arnold, President
Marin County Board of Supervisors
Cc: Senator Dianne Feinstein
Senator Kamala Harris
Congressman Jared Huffman
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# 2311
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Meg B
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# 2312
Name: Heidt, Amanda E
Correspondence: Point Reyes National Seashore has always been a quiet refuge for the natural ecosystem and the historical populations of human beings who benefited from the landscape. The proposed changes to the status of the area, and the introduction of farmland, will ultimately encroach and supplant the natural beauty and negate the opportunities for citizens looking to escape the bustle of the nearby city.
Coastal environments, free from the influence of plow and fertilizer, are needed to help buffer the land and serve as important ecotones across which energy and nutrients can flow.
As a scientist, environmentalist, and concerned citizen, I ask you not to open Point Reyes National Seashore to farming and agriculture.
___________________________
# 2313
Name: Eddy, Michael R
Correspondence: The only thing that needs management are the people that cry about encroachment because they ultimately cannot learn to coexist with NATURE. Then the greed factor sets in to bow down to ranchers etc., Let nature be nature.
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# 2314
Name: von Raesfeld, Kathleen B
Correspondence: Please continue ranching on Point Reyes and management of the Drakes Beach Tule Elk herd.
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# 2315
Name: Harker, Jana
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Jana Harker
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# 2316
Name: Banwell, elizabeth
Correspondence: What is wrong with you as an agency, isn't your job to protect our parks and public lands?
It is unconscionable that you would let ranchers and others exploit OUR lands for their personal gain (and, as in the case of Cliven Bundy, not even pay the insanely low fees you charge, without effective repercussion). Yet pollution and other harm done is left to the taxpayers to remediate. Leave the Tule elk alone, they belong on the land, not methane-gas producing, climate injuring cattle!
Crooked Trump and his swamp monsters have GOT to go, to save America and its public parks, monuments, and future.
Do your job. Protect America's public lands and wildlife.
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# 2317
Name: McNair, Rosalee
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
___________________________
# 2318
Name: N/A, Alison
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
___________________________
# 2319
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: Please help with this cause. The Tule Elk should be free to roam, just like in the old days. Wildlife is greatly affected with modern development and with so many people everywhere. Thank you
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# 2320
Name: Cole, J A
Correspondence: Esteemed representatives and appointed guardians of our Wilderness and Countryside,
I'm writing to express my support for Continued 20 Year Leases for all ranchers in the Point Reyes Area.
Nourishing and sustainable work performed by human beings is Part of Nature itself, so we are all accountable to fine-tune our relationships and economies through informed checks and balances.
In that regard I ask you to administer Replacement of All Ranch-Roaming Elk back into their natural habitat at Limantour wilderness, with enough water and forage so that they can also serve to balance fire risks there.
As we now understand, elk within cattle grazing areas impede those healthy farm procedures which bring local food from farm to table...
With Respect and Appreciation,
J. Cole
Berkeley CA.
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# 2321
Name: vayu, satya
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I support the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I strongly object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes that has greatly enhanced my visits. Their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
These lands belong to all of us! Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't control wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Cattle-ranching operations, which arguably shouldn't be on public lands at all, must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or, even worse, more commercial livestock farming such as with sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Satya Vayu
___________________________
# 2322
Name: Darley, Suzanne
Correspondence: I unequivocally support all sustainable and ranching and farming in Pt. Reyes
The ranches, the lifestyle and the rolling hills are all because of the mixed use
It is the community I live and one of the few places where Californians can experience the healthy interconnection ic farming and open space.
___________________________
# 2323
Name: Forester, Teri L
Correspondence: Managed programs promoted by ranchers who lease federal lands are not balanced and do nothing for the preservation of wildlife. Their motivations are profit driven and not environmentally driven. These ranchers are already subsidized by the less than market rates that the federal government provides on land leases. As such, I feel that these ranchers are already fairly compensated for any inconvenience that native wildlife might impose. And frankly, I think that their operations pose an unacceptable threat to that wildlife.
Please don't allow those with a financial interest in exterminating wildlife to implement their destructive wildlife management plans.
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# 2324
Name: Blain, Sarah
Correspondence: I choose Alternative 1, which is the ending of all ranching activities on public lands and leaving the elk alone. Ranching degrades the grasslands. Native plants need different grazers. Private grazing on public land is the biggest giveaway. The taxpayers does all the improvements, and the rancher cuts fences and takes whatever he can get, overgrazing whenever he can.
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# 2325
Name: nebel, bob
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service. Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
Reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
___________________________
# 2326
Name: Love, Nan Sea
Correspondence: I recall visiting Pt. Reyes National Park some years ago and being told by the Rangers we would see hordes of deer. We spent the whole day there and at the most saw one deer, but hordes of the truly no-native species, cattle. I am sharing the comment of my esteemed friend Miyoko Schinner, because although I agree completely with what she says, I cannot say it as eloquently. Please "consider the impact of ranching on the environment for years to come and adopt the first alternative, which would be to cease all ranching activities on public land and allow the Tule elk to live.
"Contrary to agricultural interests and the romantic notion of the rotational grazing movement in Marin (Marin Carbon Project, etc.), there is virtually no science to back this up. A recent international study of environmental organizations lead by Oxford University found that, in reviewing hundreds of studies, that there is no benefit whatsoever to climate change mitigation through grazing; in fact, it was found to be more harmfulthan helpful. See http://www.fcrn.org.uk/sites/default/files/project-files/fcrn_gnc_report.pdf.
"In the United States alone, due to activities of the USDA's Wildlife Services and Park Services, we have already obliterated over 60% of all wildlife in order to allow for ranching across vast tracts of public land. The longterm impacts of this invasive species (cattle, not indigenous or necessary) are not understood, but all indicators show that the over 100 million cows in this country occupying almost half of the country are severely impacting climate change. When we remove other "nuisance" species, such as deer, elk, coyotes, wolves, birds, etc. in order to maintain forage for cows, we upset the natural balance and cannot anticipate the longterm impacts on the whole of the environment.
"We don't need cows for food, and certainly free range beef does nothing to reduce global food security when it accounts for less than 1% of all protein intakes. It is a "solution" for the elite only. We need to start taking responsibility for our lands and thinking of how we can not only preserve them for generations to come but how they might be an actual solution to the impending global food crisis.
"It's easy to get caught up in the notion of supporting agricultural interests that have been around since the 1800's. The coal industry has also been around for as long, but we see now that that is not sustainable. Continuing a practice that supports a handful of families at the cost of the environment is not a choice that an enlightened county should be making. Environmentalists here often cite the fact that the white deer and Tule elk are not indigenous to this land - - but are cows? Why do we favor one species over another? It all leads back to economic interests, not environmental ones.
"We must begin to take a global approach to the activities of a few, and consider the impacts it has." Nan Sea Love
___________________________
# 2327
Name: Malenke, Debbie
Correspondence: I am writing to ask that you please stop plans for ranching in Point Reyes and allow the Tulle Elk to live undisturbed in their natural habitat. We have such few places left in the Bay Area that are untouched by human hands and I am saddened that these beautiful creatures are in danger. Please reconsider and leave that beautiful area and its residents in peace.
___________________________
# 2328
Name: klitz, karen
Correspondence: Thank you for the opportunity to submit comments on the planning for a new General Management Plan Amendment for Point Reyes National Seashore and the Golden Gate National Recreation Area for the acreage that currently has commercial livestock permits. My comments follow each of the five questions that you requested be considered and an additional comment about the purpose of this National Park Service land, referred to below as Point Reyes.
(1) How can Point Reyes protect and manage the diverse and important natural and cultural resources in the planning area?
Point Reyes cannot protect both the natural resource and commercial extractive operations, which inherently alter if not eliminate the functioning of natural ecosystems and their original biodiversity. The exotic animals (livestock), invasive species, planted crops have replaced our natural heritage. Our native wildlife, including tule elk and predators, must be allowed to live wherever they can in our public lands.
The relevant human history in Point Reyes ranching is already preserved at the Pierce Point ranch. Modern operations such as the "Historic Ranches" can be found in nearby counties, the state and the country. They are an aesthetic eyesore in addition to their ecosystem impacts, and run counter to the Park's instruction that you quoted, to "protect it from development and uses which would destroy the scenic beauty and natural character of the area."
In the second phase of this planning process, the EIS should address the multiple impacts created by livestock, among them the following:
The liquid and solid waste pollution of soil and ground water
GHG emissions
Water use
Disease transmission to tule elk
Nonnative plants
Erosion and compaction of soil
Land and water degradation
Alteration of hydrological functions
Fossil fuel use and emissions from the importation of livestock feed and other livestock support
Volume and origin of supplemental livestock feed (from outside Point Reyes)
Alterations in wildlife, including predators, due to livestock
Analysis of proportion of budget and time used to manage current ranch lands and programs and estimated budget for these in the future
(2) Are there opportunities that could enhance future stewardship in the planning area?
The planning area is an opportunity for biologists to restore 18,000 acres to Pacific coastal prairie and the other native California biomes. Adding to current efforts, it could be an exciting study area for many specialists to observe and carry out experiments in assisting nature to recover the species and processes that existed before extraction by agriculture.
(3) What types of visitor experiences, activities and facilities should be available in the planning area?
People very much need places to experience untrammeled nature, which is an environment that is more and more rare as human population increases, especially in California. With its vistas and the Pacific Ocean, Point Reyes provides countless places to explore our basic need for what nature can provide: inspiration, beauty, calm and quiet, spiritual renewal, and observations of other species in their own homes. Practically, this means providing some trails and benches, for movement and contemplation.
(4) What types of specific strategies can/should be considered for managing agricultural lease permits?
By ending the lease permits, PRNS can save that large portion of its budget and time now used for attempting to manage the agricultural area and can apply it to removal of the structures and restoration of the area. We need fewer human-created artifacts on the landscape.
(5) What types of specific strategies can/should be considered for managing tule elk?
Tule elk should be allowed to occupy all of the park as they will, unfenced, and with a minimum of interference. Their numbers should be controlled with natural predation (wolves), and until that is achieved, with sterilization. They should not be shot to test for diseases, many of which may diminish and die out once the livestock source has been removed.
The National Park Service needs to re-think its management of Point Reyes by adhering to the purpose of its creation:
"The Secretary shall administer the National Seashore "without impairment of its natural values", in a manner "consistent with, based upon, and supportive of maximum protection, restoration, and preservation of the natural environment within the area". Emphasis added. [16 U.S Code § 459c - Point Reyes National Seashore; purposes; authorization for establishment]
Planning must keep in mind that the original intent of preserving this piece of the California coast was clearly to phase out commercial use.
First, this legislation in 1962:
"Owners on the date of acquisition may retain the right of use and occupancy .... "for a term of fifty years." [Public Law 87-657 - September 14, 1962. Section 6a]
Followed by this addition in 1978:
"National Parks and Recreation Act of 1978, extended provision to agricultural property; provided for: retention rights of heirs and assigns, retention rights for term of twenty-five years or for term ending with death of owner or spouse, whichever was later, as elected by owner". [Pub. L. 95-625, Sec. 318(b)
The intention to phase out private occupation of this public land was clearly stated.
___________________________
# 2329
Name: Oggiono, Nanette
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Nanette Oggiono
___________________________
# 2330
Name: Heyne, Sarah R
Correspondence: Please do not increase farming in Point Reyes National Seashore. The increase in farming would benefit a small number of people and would negatively impact the habitat. I am a former Marin county resident and still regularly visit the area. I kayak in Tomales Bay, hike on the numerous trails, and enjoy watching the seals and tule elk. This is why the majority of people visit Point Reyes National Seashore, for the wildlife and beauty. Do not detract from that beauty. Protect our natural lands and do not increase farming!
___________________________
# 2331
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Thank you for your consideration of this important matter.
Sincerely,
___________________________
# 2332
Name: Couturie, Kathy W
Correspondence: We've been regular overnight visitors to West Marin & Point Reyes for 30 years. We have friends who have farms on Pt Reyes.
We fully support the continuation of beef and dairy farming on what is now NPS land.
We’d like to see the opportunity for that farming to be extended every 20 years. Note that it’s those same farmers & their families who enabled the NPS to operate on Point Reyes.
Further we’d like to see the Tule Elk removed from further damagithe farms and ranches that is currently seemingly being encby local NPS rangers. Please mpove the elk to the John Burton Wilderness-for the good of all.
Sadly we’ve seen the Drakes Bay oyster farm evicted for no sound environmental reasons by the NPS. Sadly we’ve seen Tule Elk encouraging deevastatethird generation farms & ranches for no good reason. Sadly we watched as the NPS rangers evicted Mary Tescornia from her farm/horse sanctuary on Hwy One near Bolinas close to 20 years ago so a "Welcome to Point Reyes" visitors center could be built. As of today nothing has been done to that property. It’s been deterat a rapid rate while rangers are allowed to live there.
Please-this continuing abuse of power needs to come to an end to preserve and protect our beloved Poont Reyes farms and ranches!
Thank you for your kind consideration.
___________________________
# 2333
Name: DuBois, Bill
Correspondence: Regarding the General Management Plan Amendment for Point Reyes National Seashore (PRNS): I support the continued operation of beef and dairy ranching operations under agricultural lease/permits with 20-year terms and improved management of the Tule elk herds to eliminate negative impacts on the environment and ranching families. The families that sold their land to enable the NPS counted on the government to keep its word. A deal is a deal. Do not further erode the citizenry's confidence in the government by going back on your word and unilaterally changing the terms of the deal.
Ranchers have been raising cattle in Point Reyes for more than 150-years. It was ranchers' willingness to sell their properties to the federal government that allowed the creation of the PRNS. As part of the agreement, ranchers were supposed to be allowed to continue ranching on their family ranches within the PRNS.
The ranches in West Marin contribute significantly to the local economy and the local culture. These ranches are not just creating economic value, they are producing high quality food appreciated by consumers locally, regionally, and nationally. Further, providing 20-year terms for lease/permits allows for greater investment in improvements on these ranches. Shorter terms prevent the ability of ranchers to obtain financing for improvements.
Improved management of the PRNS elk herds is also necessary. Elk cause thousands of dollars of damages and lost forage on ranches. Additionally, the elk carry Johne’s disease, which can be transmitted to cattle.
Ranches on PRNS provide important economic, cultural, and ecological values to the local community. Losing a significant portion of West Marin’s agricultural community would mean not only a loss of local food production, but a significant loss to its economy and culture. I urge you to offer 20-year lease/permits to ranchers on PRNS and to improve elk management and return the elk to the wilderness areas where they will not impact the ranches.
___________________________
# 2334
Name: Baldwin, Laura
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
___________________________
# 2335
Name: Russell, Erin
Correspondence: Cynthia MacLeod, Acting Superintendent
Point Reyes National Seashore
National Park Service
1 Bear Valley Road
Point Reyes Station, CA 94956
RE: General Management Plan Amendment for Point Reyes National Seashore
Dear Ms. MacLeod:
I am writing to provide input on the General Management Plan Amendment for Point Reyes National Seashore (PRNS). I support the continued operation of beef and dairy ranching operations under agricultural lease/permits with 20-year terms and improved management of the Tule elk herds to eliminate negative impacts on the environment and ranching families.
Ranchers have been raising cattle in Point Reyes for more than 150-years. It was ranchers' willingness to sell their properties to the federal government that allowed the creation of the PRNS. As part of the agreement, ranchers were supposed to be allowed to continue ranching on their family ranches within the PRNS.
The ranches in West Marin contribute significantly to the local economy and the local culture. According to any analysis by U.C. Cooperative Extension in 2009, ranches in PRNS and Golden Gate National Recreation Area (GGNRA) directly provide approximately 65 jobs and provide livelihoods for an additional 25 ranch family members. Additionally, agriculture in PRNS and GGNRA account for 17 percent of the agricultural income in Marin County. These jobs and income would be lost if further restrictions were placed on ranches within PRNS. These ranches are not just creating economic value, they are producing high quality food appreciated by consumers locally, regionally, and nationally. Further, providing 20-year terms for lease/permits allows for greater investment in improvements on these ranches. Shorter terms prevent the ability of ranchers to obtain financing for improvements.
would also like to see improved management of the PRNS elk herds. Elk cause thousands of dollars of damages and lost forage on ranches. Additionally, the elk carry Johne’s disease, which can be transmitted to cattle. USDA estimates that lost productivity from Johne’s disease in dairy cattle could be costing dairy producers between $200 and $250 million annually. Elk in the PRNS were reintroduced by humans and have been managed since their reintroduction. PRNS must improve its management by maintaining the roaming elk herds on the Limantour wilderness and preventing them from damaging ranches in the area. Additionally, PRNS should ensure that there is proper forage and water available to the herd in the Limantour wilderness to prevent a reoccurrence of the unfortunate loss of elk during the drought.
Ranches on PRNS provide important economic, cultural, and ecological values to the local community. Losing a significant portion of West Marin’s agricultural community would mean not only a loss of local food production, but a significant loss to its economy and culture. I urge you to offer 20-year lease/permits to ranchers on PRNS and to improve elk management and return the elk to the wilderness areas where they will not impact the ranches.
___________________________
# 2336
Name: Knudsen, Steven
Correspondence: Cynthia MacLeod, Acting Superintendent
Point Reyes National Seashore
National Park Service
1 Bear Valley Road
Point Reyes Station, CA 94956
RE: General Management Plan Amendment for Point Reyes National Seashore
Dear Ms. MacLeod:
I am writing to provide input on the General Management Plan Amendment for Point Reyes National Seashore (PRNS). I support the continued operation of beef and dairy ranching operations under agricultural lease/permits with 20-year terms and improved management of the Tule elk herds to eliminate negative impacts on the environment and ranching families.
Ranchers have been raising cattle in Point Reyes for more than 150-years. It was ranchers' willingness to sell their properties to the federal government that allowed the creation of the PRNS. As part of the agreement, ranchers were supposed to be allowed to continue ranching on their family ranches within the PRNS.
The ranches in West Marin contribute significantly to the local economy and the local culture. According to any analysis by U.C. Cooperative Extension in 2009, ranches in PRNS and Golden Gate National Recreation Area (GGNRA) directly provide approximately 65 jobs and provide livelihoods for an additional 25 ranch family members. Additionally, agriculture in PRNS and GGNRA account for 17 percent of the agricultural income in Marin County. These jobs and income would be lost if further restrictions were placed on ranches within PRNS. These ranches are not just creating economic value, they are producing high quality food appreciated by consumers locally, regionally, and nationally. Further, providing 20-year terms for lease/permits allows for greater investment in improvements on these ranches. Shorter terms prevent the ability of ranchers to obtain financing for improvements.
would also like to see improved management of the PRNS elk herds. Elk cause thousands of dollars of damages and lost forage on ranches. Additionally, the elk carry Johne’s disease, which can be transmitted to cattle. USDA estimates that lost productivity from Johne’s disease in dairy cattle could be costing dairy producers between $200 and $250 million annually. Elk in the PRNS were reintroduced by humans and have been managed since their reintroduction. PRNS must improve its management by maintaining the roaming elk herds on the Limantour wilderness and preventing them from damaging ranches in the area. Additionally, PRNS should ensure that there is proper forage and water available to the herd in the Limantour wilderness to prevent a reoccurrence of the unfortunate loss of elk during the drought.
Ranches on PRNS provide important economic, cultural, and ecological values to the local community. Losing a significant portion of West Marin’s agricultural community would mean not only a loss of local food production, but a significant loss to its economy and culture. I urge you to offer 20-year lease/permits to ranchers on PRNS and to improve elk management and return the elk to the wilderness areas where they will not impact the ranches.
___________________________
# 2337
Name: Groot, Norm
Correspondence: Cynthia MacLeod, Acting Superintendent
Point Reyes National Seashore
National Park Service
1 Bear Valley Road
Point Reyes Station, CA 94956
RE: General Management Plan Amendment for Point Reyes National Seashore
Dear Ms. MacLeod:
I am writing to provide input on the General Management Plan Amendment for Point Reyes National Seashore (PRNS). While I do not live in the Marin County area, I fully support the continued operation of beef and dairy ranching operations under agricultural lease/permits with minimum 20-year terms. I also support a program of improved management of the Tule elk herds to eliminate negative impacts on the environment and the ranching families who must deal with these impacts.
Ranchers have been raising cattle in Point Reyes for more than 150-years. It was ranchers' willingness to sell their properties to the federal government that allowed the creation of the PRNS.
As part of the agreement, ranchers were supposed to be allowed to continue ranching on their family ranches within the PRNS. This agreement should continued to be honored.
Ranches on PRNS provide important economic, cultural, and ecological values to the local community. Losing a significant portion of West Marin’s agricultural community would mean not only a loss of local food production, but a significant loss to its economy and culture.
I urge you to offer 20-year lease/permits to ranchers on PRNS and to improve elk management and return the elk to the wilderness areas where they belong.
Thank you for your consideration.
Norm Groot
Pacific Grove, CA
___________________________
# 2338
Name: Stokes, Sharon R
Correspondence: Cynthia MacLeod, Acting Superintendent
Point Reyes National Seashore
National Park Service
1 Bear Valley Road
Point Reyes Station, CA 94956
RE: General Management Plan Amendment for Point Reyes National Seashore
Dear Ms. MacLeod:
I am writing to provide input on the General Management Plan Amendment for Point Reyes National Seashore (PRNS). I support the continued operation of beef and dairy ranching operations under agricultural lease/permits with 20-year terms and improved management of the Tule elk herds to eliminate negative impacts on the environment and ranching families.
Ranchers have been raising cattle in Point Reyes for more than 150-years. It was ranchers' willingness to sell their properties to the federal government that allowed the creation of the PRNS. As part of the agreement, ranchers were supposed to be allowed to continue ranching on their family ranches within the PRNS.
The ranches in West Marin contribute significantly to the local economy and the local culture. According to any analysis by U.C. Cooperative Extension in 2009, ranches in PRNS and Golden Gate National Recreation Area (GGNRA) directly provide approximately 65 jobs and provide livelihoods for an additional 25 ranch family members. Additionally, agriculture in PRNS and GGNRA account for 17 percent of the agricultural income in Marin County. These jobs and income would be lost if further restrictions were placed on ranches within PRNS. These ranches are not just creating economic value, they are producing high quality food appreciated by consumers locally, regionally, and nationally. Further, providing 20-year terms for lease/permits allows for greater investment in improvements on these ranches. Shorter terms prevent the ability of ranchers to obtain financing for improvements.
would also like to see improved management of the PRNS elk herds. Elk cause thousands of dollars of damages and lost forage on ranches. Additionally, the elk carry Johne’s disease, which can be transmitted to cattle. USDA estimates that lost productivity from Johne’s disease in dairy cattle could be costing dairy producers between $200 and $250 million annually. Elk in the PRNS were reintroduced by humans and have been managed since their reintroduction. PRNS must improve its management by maintaining the roaming elk herds on the Limantour wilderness and preventing them from damaging ranches in the area. Additionally, PRNS should ensure that there is proper forage and water available to the herd in the Limantour wilderness to prevent a reoccurrence of the unfortunate loss of elk during the drought.
Ranches on PRNS provide important economic, cultural, and ecological values to the local community. Losing a significant portion of West Marin’s agricultural community would mean not only a loss of local food production, but a significant loss to its economy and culture. I urge you to offer 20-year lease/permits to ranchers on PRNS and to improve elk management and return the elk to the wilderness areas where they will not impact the ranches.
___________________________
# 2339
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: Cynthia MacLeod, Acting Superintendent
Point Reyes National Seashore
National Park Service
1 Bear Valley Road
Point Reyes Station, CA 94956
RE: General Management Plan Amendment for Point Reyes National Seashore
Dear Ms. MacLeod:
I am writing to provide input on the General Management Plan Amendment for Point Reyes National
Seashore (PRNS). I support the continued operation of beef and dairy ranching operations under
agricultural lease/permits with 20-year terms and improved management of the Tule elk herds to
eliminate negative impacts on the environment and ranching families.
Ranchers have been raising cattle in Point Reyes for more than 150-years. It was ranchers' willingness to
sell their properties to the federal government that allowed the creation of the PRNS. As part of the
agreement, ranchers were supposed to be allowed to continue ranching on their family ranches within
the PRNS.
The ranches in West Marin contribute significantly to the local economy and the local culture. According
to any analysis by U.C. Cooperative Extension in 2009, ranches in PRNS and Golden Gate National
Recreation Area (GGNRA) directly provide approximately 65 jobs and provide livelihoods for an
additional 25 ranch family members. Additionally, agriculture in PRNS and GGNRA account for 17
percent of the agricultural income in Marin County. These jobs and income would be lost if further
restrictions were placed on ranches within PRNS. These ranches are not just creating economic value,
they are producing high quality food appreciated by consumers locally, regionally, and nationally.
Further, providing 20-year terms for lease/permits allows for greater investment in improvements on
these ranches. Shorter terms prevent the ability of ranchers to obtain financing for improvements.
I would also like to see improved management of the PRNS elk herds. Elk cause thousands of dollars of
damages and lost forage on ranches. Additionally, the elk carry Johne’s disease, which can be
transmitted to cattle. USDA estimates that lost productivity from Johne’s disease in dairy cattle could be
costing dairy producers between $200 and $250 million annually. Elk in the PRNS were reintroduced by
humans and have been managed since their reintroduction. PRNS must improve its management by
maintaining the roaming elk herds on the Limantour wilderness and preventing them from damaging
ranches in the area. Additionally, PRNS should ensure that there is proper forage and water available to
the herd in the Limantour wilderness to prevent a reoccurrence of the unfortunate loss of elk during the
drought.
Ranches on PRNS provide important economic, cultural, and ecological values to the local community.
Losing a significant portion of West Marin’s agricultural community would mean not only a loss of local
food production, but a significant loss to its economy and culture. I urge you to offer 20-year
lease/permits to ranchers on PRNS and to improve elk management and return the elk to the wilderness
areas where they will not impact the ranches.
___________________________
# 2340
Name: Teresi, Anthony T
Correspondence: I am writing to provide input on the General Management Plan Amendment for Point Reyes National Seashore (PRNS). I support the continued operation of beef and dairy ranching operations under agricultural lease/permits with 20-year terms and improved management of the Tule elk herds to eliminate negative impacts on the environment and ranching families.
Ranchers have been raising cattle in Point Reyes for more than 150-years. It was ranchers' willingness to sell their properties to the federal government that allowed the creation of the PRNS. As part of the agreement, ranchers were supposed to be allowed to continue ranching on their family ranches within the PRNS.
The ranches in West Marin contribute significantly to the local economy and the local culture. According to any analysis by U.C. Cooperative Extension in 2009, ranches in PRNS and Golden Gate National Recreation Area (GGNRA) directly provide approximately 65 jobs and provide livelihoods for an additional 25 ranch family members. Additionally, agriculture in PRNS and GGNRA account for 17 percent of the agricultural income in Marin County. These jobs and income would be lost if further restrictions were placed on ranches within PRNS. These ranches are not just creating economic value, they are producing high quality food appreciated by consumers locally, regionally, and nationally. Further, providing 20-year terms for lease/permits allows for greater investment in improvements on these ranches. Shorter terms prevent the ability of ranchers to obtain financing for improvements.
would also like to see improved management of the PRNS elk herds. Elk cause thousands of dollars of damages and lost forage on ranches. Additionally, the elk carry Johne’s disease, which can be transmitted to cattle. USDA estimates that lost productivity from Johne’s disease in dairy cattle could be costing dairy producers between $200 and $250 million annually. Elk in the PRNS were reintroduced by humans and have been managed since their reintroduction. PRNS must improve its management by maintaining the roaming elk herds on the Limantour wilderness and preventing them from damaging ranches in the area. Additionally, PRNS should ensure that there is proper forage and water available to the herd in the Limantour wilderness to prevent a reoccurrence of the unfortunate loss of elk during the drought.
Ranches on PRNS provide important economic, cultural, and ecological values to the local community. Losing a significant portion of West Marin’s agricultural community would mean not only a loss of local food production, but a significant loss to its economy and culture. I urge you to offer 20-year lease/permits to ranchers on PRNS and to improve elk management and return the elk to the wilderness areas where they will not impact the ranches.
___________________________
# 2341
Name: captain, susan m
Correspondence: Hi,
It is time to protect our farm lands and farmers who are willing to put in their time, hard work and effort to produce unique product to share with our community. please let the ranchers be and stop harassing them. I am a grower, producing a family size crop and process it to very small quantity wine to share with my family, friend and community. I feel the satisfaction of participating in farming brings joy, product and supports the community at large.
Regards
___________________________
# 2342
Name: Johnson, Curt
Correspondence: The Park Service promised the farmers and ranchers that they would be allowed to continue their operations as they normally would. Any deviation from that will result in distrust of the Park Service, and possible political repercussions. To break the trust will be very bad for the landowners and the Park Service. Keep your promises: Leave the landowners alone!
___________________________
# 2343
Name: DeMaria, Christine B
Correspondence: Re: Point Reyes National Park
It is time the government kept it promises to the ranchers and others in the original deal made with them. If the government doesn't keep promises then why would anyone make a deal with the government.
Let the current uses of the Point Reyes area remain. It is a beautiful spot as it is.
Christine DeMaria
___________________________
# 2344
Name: Dyt, Rich A
Correspondence: Cynthia MacLeod, Acting Superintendent
Point Reyes National Seashore
National Park Service
1 Bear Valley Road
Point Reyes Station, CA 94956
RE: General Management Plan Amendment for Point Reyes National Seashore
Dear Ms. MacLeod:
I am writing to provide input on the General Management Plan Amendment for Point Reyes National Seashore (PRNS). I support the continued operation of beef and dairy ranching operations under agricultural lease/permits with 20-year terms and improved management of the Tule elk herds to eliminate negative impacts on the environment and ranching families.
Ranchers have been raising cattle in Point Reyes for more than 150-years. It was ranchers' willingness to sell their properties to the federal government that allowed the creation of the PRNS. As part of the agreement, ranchers were supposed to be allowed to continue ranching on their family ranches within the PRNS.
The ranches in West Marin contribute significantly to the local economy and the local culture. According to any analysis by U.C. Cooperative Extension in 2009, ranches in PRNS and Golden Gate National Recreation Area (GGNRA) directly provide approximately 65 jobs and provide livelihoods for an additional 25 ranch family members. Additionally, agriculture in PRNS and GGNRA account for 17 percent of the agricultural income in Marin County. These jobs and income would be lost if further restrictions were placed on ranches within PRNS. These ranches are not just creating economic value, they are producing high quality food appreciated by consumers locally, regionally, and nationally. Further, providing 20-year terms for lease/permits allows for greater investment in improvements on these ranches. Shorter terms prevent the ability of ranchers to obtain financing for improvements.
would also like to see improved management of the PRNS elk herds. Elk cause thousands of dollars of damages and lost forage on ranches. Additionally, the elk carry Johne's disease, which can be transmitted to cattle. USDA estimates that lost productivity from Johne’s disease in dairy cattle could be costing dairy producers between $200 and $250 million annually. Elk in the PRNS were reintroduced by humans and have been managed since their reintroduction. PRNS must improve its management by maintaining the roaming elk herds on the Limantour wilderness and preventing them from damaging ranches in the area. Additionally, PRNS should ensure that there is proper forage and water available to the herd in the Limantour wilderness to prevent a reoccurrence of the unfortunate loss of elk during the drought.
Ranches on PRNS provide important economic, cultural, and ecological values to the local community. Losing a significant portion of West Marin’s agricultural community would mean not only a loss of local food production, but a significant loss to its economy and culture. I urge you to offer 20-year lease/permits to ranchers on PRNS and to improve elk management and return the elk to the wilderness areas where they will not impact the ranches.
___________________________
# 2345
Name: Herman, Sara
Correspondence: I am writing to provide input on the General Management Plan Amendment for Point Reyes National Seashore (PRNS). I support the continued operation of beef and dairy ranching operations under agricultural lease/permits with 20-year terms and improved management of the Tule elk herds to eliminate negative impacts on the environment and ranching families.
Ranchers have been raising cattle in Point Reyes for more than 150-years. It was ranchers' willingness to sell their properties to the federal government that allowed the creation of the PRNS. As part of the agreement, ranchers were supposed to be allowed to continue ranching on their family ranches within the PRNS.
The ranches in West Marin contribute significantly to the local economy and the local culture. According to any analysis by U.C. Cooperative Extension in 2009, ranches in PRNS and Golden Gate National Recreation Area (GGNRA) directly provide approximately 65 jobs and provide livelihoods for an additional 25 ranch family members. Additionally, agriculture in PRNS and GGNRA account for 17 percent of the agricultural income in Marin County. These jobs and income would be lost if further restrictions were placed on ranches within PRNS. These ranches are not just creating economic value, they are producing high quality food appreciated by consumers locally, regionally, and nationally. Further, providing 20-year terms for lease/permits allows for greater investment in improvements on these ranches. Shorter terms prevent the ability of ranchers to obtain financing for improvements.
would also like to see improved management of the PRNS elk herds. Elk cause thousands of dollars of damages and lost forage on ranches. Additionally, the elk carry Johne’s disease, which can be transmitted to cattle. USDA estimates that lost productivity from Johne’s disease in dairy cattle could be costing dairy producers between $200 and $250 million annually. Elk in the PRNS were reintroduced by humans and have been managed since their reintroduction. PRNS must improve its management by maintaining the roaming elk herds on the Limantour wilderness and preventing them from damaging ranches in the area. Additionally, PRNS should ensure that there is proper forage and water available to the herd in the Limantour wilderness to prevent a reoccurrence of the unfortunate loss of elk during the drought.
Ranches on PRNS provide important economic, cultural, and ecological values to the local community. Losing a significant portion of West Marin’s agricultural community would mean not only a loss of local food production, but a significant loss to its economy and culture. I urge you to offer 20-year lease/permits to ranchers on PRNS and to improve elk management and return the elk to the wilderness areas where they will not impact the ranches.
___________________________
# 2346
Name: tonascia, mari
Correspondence: Just wanted to voice my opinion on the Point Reyes ranching changes. I support the ranchers and them being allowed to operate as they have for the past 150 years. There is too LITTLE agriculture. The changes to AG in California are devastating it and have gone too far. Please see that voting taxpaying residents do not agree with these changes and do not agree with the massive changes in policy. I dont know who you think will be feeding you or providing your family with nutrition in the future should you run all the dairy's and food producers out of the state! Just letting you know I am not happy.
Mari Tonascia
___________________________
# 2347
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: I support continued ranching within Point Reyes and management of the park's elk herd to protect the agricultural heritage.
___________________________
# 2348
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: For many years ranchers have been on the Point Reyes land. That is where most of our local farmers started then moved on to buy their own ranch and continued to dairy farm. The land has always been taken care of for the purpose of feeding our dairy animals, wild life as well, and saw that the land itself was well maintained.That land was never abused. I support keeping the land in use for dairy farmers who have cared for that land and will always keep caring not abusing the land. Wild life as well will then also be taken care of.
___________________________
# 2349
Name: Kazynski, Jerrold
Correspondence: Ranching and livestock operations have been conducted within Point Reyes National Park since its foundation. If sensitive species exist there, those ranching operations should be congratulated and allowed to continue without major changes, limitations, or exclusions. The scientific method suggests their ranching activities have coexisted for decades and therefore should be allowed to continue.
Other ranching operations in other areas have had to expend significant funds to modify, curtail, or relocate ostensibly to protect sensitive or endangered plant and animal species found on their property or lands owned by others. At those locations, said sensitive species have been doing well absent State and/or Federal involvement. I surmise such evidence supports continued ranching and other such activities instead of any reductions there of.
Thank you for your service to local, State, and Federal citizens who appreciate your efforts.
___________________________
# 2350
Name: Puglisi, Allison
Correspondence: Thank you for taking my comments: In a nutshell: 1) Leave the farmers and ranchers where they are with a 99 year lease. Have a designated third party oversee these lands to make sure the farmers and ranchers are taking care of the land properly.
2) Either remove all the elk from these ranch lands or put up fences so the elk cannot get into the ranches
3) Manage the elk herd on the point so that they do not overrun the land with too many elk however best - sterilization, shooting with the meat being used, or removal to some distant wild area that will not impact ranch lands probably not the most efficient or money saving
___________________________
# 2351
Name: T, L
Correspondence: I live in Sonoma currently but was born in and raised in Marin. My family has lived in Marin since the 1930's and most of them still reside there. Our family has many ties to West Marin especially PRNS. I may be biased in my pro ranching and dairy opinions but my understanding is that the ranches were bought to protect from future development and to continue ranching. To now have the environmental groups come in and spread all their propaganda that the ranches are now causing all this damage wrecking the ecosystems. When they originally teamed up with the ranchers to help facilitate with the government to buy the land. Now they want to kick them off the land. I say let the ranchers buy back the land!
___________________________
# 2352
Name: White, Johnnie W
Correspondence: Dear Ms. MacLeod:
I am writing to provide input on the General Management Plan Amendment for Point Reyes National Seashore (PRNS). I support the continued operation of beef and dairy ranching operations under agricultural lease/permits with 20-year terms and improved management of the Tule elk herds to eliminate negative impacts on the environment and ranching families.
Ranchers have been raising cattle in Point Reyes for more than 150-years. It was ranchers' willingness to sell their properties to the federal government that allowed the creation of the PRNS. As part of the agreement, ranchers were supposed to be allowed to continue ranching on their family ranches within the PRNS.
The ranches in West Marin contribute significantly to the local economy and the local culture. According to any analysis by U.C. Cooperative Extension in 2009, ranches in PRNS and Golden Gate National Recreation Area (GGNRA) directly provide approximately 65 jobs and provide livelihoods for an additional 25 ranch family members. Additionally, agriculture in PRNS and GGNRA account for 17 percent of the agricultural income in Marin County. These jobs and income would be lost if further restrictions were placed on ranches within PRNS. These ranches are not just creating economic value, they are producing high quality food appreciated by consumers locally, regionally, and nationally. Further, providing 20-year terms for lease/permits allows for greater investment in improvements on these ranches. Shorter terms prevent the ability of ranchers to obtain financing for improvements.
would also like to see improved management of the PRNS elk herds. Elk cause thousands of dollars of damages and lost forage on ranches. Additionally, the elk carry Johne’s disease, which can be transmitted to cattle. USDA estimates that lost productivity from Johne’s disease in dairy cattle could be costing dairy producers between $200 and $250 million annually. Elk in the PRNS were reintroduced by humans and have been managed since their reintroduction. PRNS must improve its management by maintaining the roaming elk herds on the Limantour wilderness and preventing them from damaging ranches in the area. Additionally, PRNS should ensure that there is proper forage and water available to the herd in the Limantour wilderness to prevent a reoccurrence of the unfortunate loss of elk during the drought.
Ranches on PRNS provide important economic, cultural, and ecological values to the local community. Losing a significant portion of West Marin’s agricultural community would mean not only a loss of local food production, but a significant loss to its economy and culture. I urge you to offer 20-year lease/permits to ranchers on PRNS and to improve elk management and return the elk to the wilderness areas where they will not impact the ranches.
___________________________
# 2353
Name: N/A, Sandra
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service. Killing these elk, either directly or indirectly, is not a reasonable option. Please - - no repeat of the past starving and killing of the animals that belong on this land.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species. They should be phased off the land.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
___________________________
# 2354
Name: Cloud, Aleda
Correspondence: Grazing and proper agricultural practices have been proven to sequester soil carbon and permanently remove atmospheric CO2, this should be our number one priority!
Point Reyes National Seashore has the benefit of The Carbon Cycle Institute in their back yard. The CCI, using proper and repeatable science has shown that promoting healthy rangelands and forests is the only way to reverse the perilous situation in which we find our planet.
We are all on the same side, we're trying to make our world a healthier place. Don't let unwarranted prejudice against grazing prevent you from making the best decisions for PRNS.
Please look at the facts and respect the science. Proper grazing is VITAL to maintaining a healthy working landscape.
Healthy Soils = Healthy Communities = Healthy Planet
Thank you.
___________________________
# 2355
Name: Morais, Karen E
Correspondence: Cynthia MacLeod, Acting Superintendent
Point Reyes National Seashore
National Park Service
1 Bear Valley Road
Point Reyes Station, CA 94956
RE: General Management Plan Amendment for Point Reyes National Seashore
Dear Ms. MacLeod:
I am writing to provide input on the General Management Plan Amendment for Point Reyes National Seashore (PRNS). I support the continued operation of beef and dairy ranching operations under agricultural lease/permits with 20-year terms and improved management of the Tule elk herds to eliminate negative impacts on the environment and ranching families.
My family were immigrant dairy farmers in the San Joaquin Valley. Starting their operations in the late 1800s.
Ranchers have been raising cattle in Point Reyes for more than 150-years. It was ranchers' willingness to sell their properties to the federal government that allowed the creation of the PRNS. As part of the agreement, ranchers were supposed to be allowed to continue ranching on their family ranches within the PRNS.
The ranches in West Marin contribute significantly to the local economy and the local culture. According to any analysis by U.C. Cooperative Extension in 2009, ranches in PRNS and Golden Gate National Recreation Area (GGNRA) directly provide approximately 65 jobs and provide livelihoods for an additional 25 ranch family members. Additionally, agriculture in PRNS and GGNRA account for 17 percent of the agricultural income in Marin County. These jobs and income would be lost if further restrictions were placed on ranches within PRNS. These ranches are not just creating economic value, they are producing high quality food appreciated by consumers locally, regionally, and nationally. Further, providing 20-year terms for lease/permits allows for greater investment in improvements on these ranches. Shorter terms prevent the ability of ranchers to obtain financing for improvements.
would also like to see improved management of the PRNS elk herds. Elk cause thousands of dollars of damages and lost forage on ranches. Additionally, the elk carry Johne’s disease, which can be transmitted to cattle. USDA estimates that lost productivity from Johne’s disease in dairy cattle could be costing dairy producers between $200 and $250 million annually. Elk in the PRNS were reintroduced by humans and have been managed since their reintroduction. PRNS must improve its management by maintaining the roaming elk herds on the Limantour wilderness and preventing them from damaging ranches in the area. Additionally, PRNS should ensure that there is proper forage and water available to the herd in the Limantour wilderness to prevent a reoccurrence of the unfortunate loss of elk during the drought.
Ranches on PRNS provide important economic, cultural, and ecological values to the local community. Losing a significant portion of West Marin’s agricultural community would mean not only a loss of local food production, but a significant loss to its economy and culture. I urge you to offer 20-year lease/permits to ranchers on PRNS and to improve elk management and return the elk to the wilderness areas where they will not impact the ranches.
Kind regards,
Karen E Morais
___________________________
# 2356
Name: Porter, Hilary l
Correspondence: Cynthia MacLeod, Acting Superintendent
Point Reyes National Seashore
National Park Service
1 Bear Valley Road
Point Reyes Station, CA 94956
RE: General Management Plan Amendment for Point Reyes National Seashore
Dear Ms. MacLeod:
I am writing to provide input on the General Management Plan Amendment for Point Reyes National Seashore (PRNS). I support the continued operation of beef and dairy ranching operations under agricultural lease/permits with 20-year terms and improved management of the Tule elk herds to eliminate negative impacts on the environment and ranching families.
Ranchers have been raising cattle in Point Reyes for more than 150 years. It was ranchers' willingness to sell their properties to the federal government that allowed the creation of the PRNS. As part of the agreement, ranchers were supposed to be allowed to continue ranching on their family ranches within the PRNS.
The ranches in West Marin contribute significantly to the local economy and the local culture. According to any analysis by U.C. Cooperative Extension in 2009, ranches in PRNS and Golden Gate National Recreation Area (GGNRA) directly provide approximately 65 jobs and provide livelihoods for an additional 25 ranch family members. Additionally, agriculture in PRNS and GGNRA account for 17 percent of the agricultural income in Marin County. These jobs and income would be lost if further restrictions were placed on ranches within PRNS. These ranches are not just creating economic value, they are producing high quality food appreciated by consumers locally, regionally, and nationally. Further, providing 20-year terms for lease/permits allows for greater investment in improvements on these ranches. Shorter terms prevent the ability of ranchers to obtain financing for improvements.
would also like to see improved management of the PRNS elk herds. Elk cause thousands of dollars of damages and lost forage on ranches. Additionally, the elk carry Johne’s disease, which can be transmitted to cattle. USDA estimates that lost productivity from Johne’s disease in dairy cattle could be costing dairy producers between $200 and $250 million annually. Elk in the PRNS were reintroduced by humans and have been managed since their reintroduction. PRNS must improve its management by maintaining the roaming elk herds on the Limantour wilderness and preventing them from damaging ranches in the area. Additionally, PRNS should ensure that there is proper forage and water available to the herd in the Limantour wilderness to prevent a reoccurrence of the unfortunate loss of elk during the drought.
Ranches on PRNS provide important economic, cultural, and ecological values to the local community. Losing a significant portion of West Marin’s agricultural community would mean not only a loss of local food production, but a significant loss to its economy and culture. I urge you to offer 20-year lease/permits to ranchers on PRNS and to improve elk management and return the elk to the wilderness areas where they will not impact the ranches.
___________________________
# 2357
Name: Marsh, Catherine
Correspondence: Please allow ranching activities to continue in Point Reyes.
Thank you.
___________________________
# 2358
Name: Serres, Taylor P
Correspondence: Cynthia MacLeod, Acting Superintendent
Point Reyes National Seashore
National Park Service
1 Bear Valley Road
Point Reyes Station, CA 94956
RE: General Management Plan Amendment for Point Reyes National Seashore
Dear Ms. MacLeod:
I am writing to provide input on the General Management Plan Amendment for Point Reyes National Seashore (PRNS). I support the continued operation of beef and dairy ranching operations under agricultural lease/permits with 20-year terms and improved management of the Tule elk herds to eliminate negative impacts on the environment and ranching families.
Ranchers have been raising cattle in Point Reyes for more than 150-years. It was ranchers' willingness to sell their properties to the federal government that allowed the creation of the PRNS. As part of the agreement, ranchers were supposed to be allowed to continue ranching on their family ranches within the PRNS.
The ranches in West Marin contribute significantly to the local economy and the local culture. According to any analysis by U.C. Cooperative Extension in 2009, ranches in PRNS and Golden Gate National Recreation Area (GGNRA) directly provide approximately 65 jobs and provide livelihoods for an additional 25 ranch family members. Additionally, agriculture in PRNS and GGNRA account for 17 percent of the agricultural income in Marin County. These jobs and income would be lost if further restrictions were placed on ranches within PRNS. These ranches are not just creating economic value, they are producing high quality food appreciated by consumers locally, regionally, and nationally. Further, providing 20-year terms for lease/permits allows for greater investment in improvements on these ranches. Shorter terms prevent the ability of ranchers to obtain financing for improvements.
would also like to see improved management of the PRNS elk herds. Elk cause thousands of dollars of damages and lost forage on ranches. Additionally, the elk carry Johne’s disease, which can be transmitted to cattle. USDA estimates that lost productivity from Johne’s disease in dairy cattle could be costing dairy producers between $200 and $250 million annually. Elk in the PRNS were reintroduced by humans and have been managed since their reintroduction. PRNS must improve its management by maintaining the roaming elk herds on the Limantour wilderness and preventing them from damaging ranches in the area. Additionally, PRNS should ensure that there is proper forage and water available to the herd in the Limantour wilderness to prevent a reoccurrence of the unfortunate loss of elk during the drought.
Ranches on PRNS provide important economic, cultural, and ecological values to the local community. Losing a significant portion of West Marin’s agricultural community would mean not only a loss of local food production, but a significant loss to its economy and culture. I urge you to offer 20-year lease/permits to ranchers on PRNS and to improve elk management and return the elk to the wilderness areas where they will not impact the ranches.
Thank you,
Taylor Serres
Sonoma-Marin YF&R Representative
___________________________
# 2359
Name: BISHOP, THOMAS W
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
The Point Reyes National Seashore has been, and can continue to be a wonderful example of partnerships and cooperation. In my opinion it is well balanced and is successfully managing environmental, public access, and the recreational and educational needs of current and future generations.
As a loving visitor of the area, it currently offers a tremendous set of options for photography, hiking, picnicking, biking, and overall enjoyment of nature and its collaboration with the farming community. The farming community is an integral part of the charm of the National Seashore and the farms deserve protection. The facilities for the area, in my view are adequate. I would NOT like to see much beyond parking and toilet facilities and educational displays, as it is and should remain a 'wilderness' type experience.
As to the Elk, they are beautiful animals, but even if they were given free range of the entire National Seashore, it would not be the equivalent of free-ranging elk herds elsewhere in the world, where herds live and die in natures broad wildernesses and its related ’natural controls'. So we are faced with the need to manage the herds and the question becomes how to do this within the vision of a limited geographical area. The Point Reyes National Seashore is not a zoo and is not an elk breeding facility; so, to the degree the herds can be effectively managed within the reasonable constraints of public access and continuation of farming... we should do just that: manage the herds in a manner that preserve the farms and enable continued, largely unfettered public access.
Agricultural lease and permit strategies should mirror this vision. And, while I am not an expert in the current leasing/permit system, in my view it is working and should not be radically changed.
In summary, my philosophy in nurturing the precious and unique experience which is the Point Reyes National Seashore is ‘don’t fix that which is not broken’.
Respectfully,
Tom Bishop
___________________________
# 2360
Name: Hogan, Kathryn M
Correspondence:
I am writing to provide input on the General Management Plan Amendment for Point Reyes National Seashore (PRNS). I support the continued operation of beef and dairy ranching operations under agricultural lease/permits with 20-year terms and improved management of the Tule elk herds to eliminate negative impacts on the environment and ranching families.
Ranchers have been raising cattle in Point Reyes for more than 150-years. It was ranchers' willingness to sell their properties to the federal government that allowed the creation of the PRNS. As part of the agreement, ranchers were supposed to be allowed to continue ranching on their family ranches within the PRNS.
The ranches in West Marin contribute significantly to the local economy and the local culture. According to any analysis by U.C. Cooperative Extension in 2009, ranches in PRNS and Golden Gate National Recreation Area (GGNRA) directly provide approximately 65 jobs and provide livelihoods for an additional 25 ranch family members. Additionally, agriculture in PRNS and GGNRA account for 17 percent of the agricultural income in Marin County. These jobs and income would be lost if further restrictions were placed on ranches within PRNS. These ranches are not just creating economic value, they are producing high quality food appreciated by consumers locally, regionally, and nationally. Further, providing 20-year terms for lease/permits allows for greater investment in improvements on these ranches. Shorter terms prevent the ability of ranchers to obtain financing for improvements.
would also like to see improved management of the PRNS elk herds. Elk cause thousands of dollars of damages and lost forage on ranches. Additionally, the elk carry Johne’s disease, which can be transmitted to cattle. USDA estimates that lost productivity from Johne’s disease in dairy cattle could be costing dairy producers between $200 and $250 million annually. Elk in the PRNS were reintroduced by humans and have been managed since their reintroduction. PRNS must improve its management by maintaining the roaming elk herds on the Limantour wilderness and preventing them from damaging ranches in the area. Additionally, PRNS should ensure that there is proper forage and water available to the herd in the Limantour wilderness to prevent a reoccurrence of the unfortunate loss of elk during the drought.
Ranches on PRNS provide important economic, cultural, and ecological values to the local community. Losing a significant portion of West Marin’s agricultural community would mean not only a loss of local food production, but a significant loss to its economy and culture. I urge you to offer 20-year lease/permits to ranchers on PRNS and to improve elk management and return the elk to the wilderness areas where they will not impact the ranches.
___________________________
# 2361
Name: Barca, Erin
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
It has long been a dream of mine to see Point Reyes in its true colors. In the form of thriving native plants no longer trampled by livestock nor outcompeted by the invasives that gain ground in their hoof steps. No more denuded hills and fields. This alone would herald in a great pulse of invertebrate and vertebrate life. What a beautiful, lovely, scentful dream. Finally free of the suffocating stench of cow flop. No one in their right mind seeks wilder reaches to smell that. It does not belong. It should not be here.
The decision to follow our nation's laws and protect wildlife, native plants, and the ecosystems they collectively represent, unimpaired, within our National Parks is important not only to the people of California, but to the entire United States. At stake is the integrity of ALL of America’s National Parks.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore. Please, follow the rule of law and give tule elk and other native species precedence over commercial interests currently impoverishing our federally protected lands. Stop allowing private interests to abuse it. It has been a privilege for ranchers to remain in our National Seashore, NOT a right. With these most recent pushes to kill and even eradicate tule elk and expand their incompatible business with even more livestock and more crops, makes it crystal clear that they have stayed well past their welcome. There are a mere 3,900 tule elk left spread thin across the entire state in 22 herds. There are 5,250,000 cattle. Fair market value was paid for these ranches in the 1960s and 1970s, their leases should not be renewed. It is high time that we allow a battered Point Reyes National Seashore to recover and return to natural conditions. Point Reyes is one of America’s most special places and is too important to sacrifice to power politics and special interests.
Please honor and protect Point Reyes National Seashore. We and future generations will thank you for your upholding the National Park System.
Sincerely,
___________________________
# 2362
Name: Crook, Shaun
Correspondence: Cynthia MacLeod, Acting Superintendent
Point Reyes National Seashore
National Park Service
1 Bear Valley Road
Point Reyes Station, CA 94956
RE: General Management Plan Amendment for Point Reyes National Seashore
Dear Ms. MacLeod:
I am writing to provide input on the General Management Plan Amendment for Point Reyes National Seashore (PRNS). I support the continued operation of beef and dairy ranching operations under agricultural lease/permits with 20-year terms and improved management of the Tule elk herds to eliminate negative impacts on the environment and ranching families.
Ranchers have been raising cattle in Point Reyes for more than 150-years. It was ranchers' willingness to sell their properties to the federal government that allowed the creation of the PRNS. As part of the agreement, ranchers were supposed to be allowed to continue ranching on their family ranches within the PRNS.
The ranches in West Marin contribute significantly to the local economy and the local culture. According to any analysis by U.C. Cooperative Extension in 2009, ranches in PRNS and Golden Gate National Recreation Area (GGNRA) directly provide approximately 65 jobs and provide livelihoods for an additional 25 ranch family members. Additionally, agriculture in PRNS and GGNRA account for 17 percent of the agricultural income in Marin County. These jobs and income would be lost if further restrictions were placed on ranches within PRNS. These ranches are not just creating economic value, they are producing high quality food appreciated by consumers locally, regionally, and nationally. Further, providing 20-year terms for lease/permits allows for greater investment in improvements on these ranches. Shorter terms prevent the ability of ranchers to obtain financing for improvements.
would also like to see improved management of the PRNS elk herds. Elk cause thousands of dollars of damages and lost forage on ranches. Additionally, the elk carry Johne’s disease, which can be transmitted to cattle. USDA estimates that lost productivity from Johne’s disease in dairy cattle could be costing dairy producers between $200 and $250 million annually. Elk in the PRNS were reintroduced by humans and have been managed since their reintroduction. PRNS must improve its management by maintaining the roaming elk herds on the Limantour wilderness and preventing them from damaging ranches in the area. Additionally, PRNS should ensure that there is proper forage and water available to the herd in the Limantour wilderness to prevent a reoccurrence of the unfortunate loss of elk during the drought.
Ranches on PRNS provide important economic, cultural, and ecological values to the local community. Losing a significant portion of West Marin’s agricultural community would mean not only a loss of local food production, but a significant loss to its economy and culture. I urge you to offer 20-year lease/permits to ranchers on PRNS and to improve elk management and return the elk to the wilderness areas where they will not impact the ranches.
Sincerely,
Shaun Crook
President
Tuolumne County Farm Bureau
___________________________
# 2363
Name: McBride, Lynne M
Correspondence: Cynthia MacLeod, Acting Superintendent
Point Reyes National Seashore
National Park Service
1 Bear Valley Road
Point Reyes Station, CA 94956
RE: General Management Plan Amendment for Point Reyes National Seashore
Dear Ms. MacLeod:
I am writing to provide input on the General Management Plan Amendment for Point Reyes National Seashore (PRNS). I support the continued operation of beef and dairy ranching operations under agricultural lease/permits with 20-year terms and improved management of the Tule elk herds to eliminate negative impacts on the environment and ranching families.
Ranchers have been raising cattle in Point Reyes for more than 150-years. It was ranchers' willingness to sell their properties to the federal government that allowed the creation of the PRNS. As part of the agreement, ranchers were supposed to be allowed to continue ranching on their family ranches within the PRNS.
The ranches in West Marin contribute significantly to the local economy and the local culture. According to any analysis by U.C. Cooperative Extension in 2009, ranches in PRNS and Golden Gate National Recreation Area (GGNRA) directly provide approximately 65 jobs and provide livelihoods for an additional 25 ranch family members. Additionally, agriculture in PRNS and GGNRA account for 17 percent of the agricultural income in Marin County. These jobs and income would be lost if further restrictions were placed on ranches within PRNS. These ranches are not just creating economic value, they are producing high quality food appreciated by consumers locally, regionally, and nationally. Further, providing 20-year terms for lease/permits allows for greater investment in improvements on these ranches. Shorter terms prevent the ability of ranchers to obtain financing for improvements.
Ranches on PRNS provide important economic, cultural, and ecological values to the local community. Losing a significant portion of West Marin’s agricultural community would mean not only a loss of local food production, but a significant loss to its economy and culture. I urge you to offer 20-year lease/permits to ranchers on PRNS.
___________________________
# 2364
Name: Tracy, Felicia
Correspondence: To Whom it may Concern:
The National Park Service must recognize that the heritage and culture of an area is what brings people to visit and enjoy it. Natural scenic beauty is just as important to farmers and fisherman who live their lives helping sustain and maintain lands as it would seem to be for those visiting Parks. It is those who work the land and tend their livestock who have created much of our coastal lands into destinations, by their good management and care throughout generations. It should be obvious that years of government and environmentalist policies to "leave the land alone" that man has created a monster of destruction. If you farm or ranch upon land, you depend upon it to support your business, and your priority is good stewardship of that land. The Park Service would do well to support farmers, ranchers, and fisherman in those endeavors. This includes a better management program for the elk, for the benefit of the elk , other livestock, and their habitat.
Sincerely yours, Felicia Tracy
___________________________
# 2365
Name: Frye, Sam
Correspondence: I am writing to provide input on the General Management Plan Amendment for Point Reyes National Seashore (PRNS). I support the continued operation of beef and dairy ranching operations under agricultural lease/permits with 20-year terms and improved management of the Tule elk herds to eliminate negative impacts on the environment and ranching families.
Ranchers have been raising cattle in Point Reyes for more than 150-years. It was ranchers' willingness to sell their properties to the federal government that allowed the creation of the PRNS. As part of the agreement, ranchers were supposed to be allowed to continue ranching on their family ranches within the PRNS.
The ranches in West Marin contribute significantly to the local economy and the local culture. According to any analysis by U.C. Cooperative Extension in 2009, ranches in PRNS and Golden Gate National Recreation Area (GGNRA) directly provide approximately 65 jobs and provide livelihoods for an additional 25 ranch family members. Additionally, agriculture in PRNS and GGNRA account for 17 percent of the agricultural income in Marin County. These jobs and income would be lost if further restrictions were placed on ranches within PRNS. These ranches are not just creating economic value, they are producing high quality food appreciated by consumers locally, regionally, and nationally. Further, providing 20-year terms for lease/permits allows for greater investment in improvements on these ranches. Shorter terms prevent the ability of ranchers to obtain financing for improvements.
would also like to see improved management of the PRNS elk herds. Elk cause thousands of dollars of damages and lost forage on ranches. Additionally, the elk carry Johne’s disease, which can be transmitted to cattle. USDA estimates that lost productivity from Johne’s disease in dairy cattle could be costing dairy producers between $200 and $250 million annually. Elk in the PRNS were reintroduced by humans and have been managed since their reintroduction. PRNS must improve its management by maintaining the roaming elk herds on the Limantour wilderness and preventing them from damaging ranches in the area. Additionally, PRNS should ensure that there is proper forage and water available to the herd in the Limantour wilderness to prevent a reoccurrence of the unfortunate loss of elk during the drought.
Ranches on PRNS provide important economic, cultural, and ecological values to the local community. Losing a significant portion of West Marin’s agricultural community would mean not only a loss of local food production, but a significant loss to its economy and culture. I urge you to offer 20-year lease/permits to ranchers on PRNS and to improve elk management and return the elk to the wilderness areas where they will not impact the ranches.
___________________________
# 2366
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: Please do not do this. It is outrageous that this is up for consideration. Protect our oceans and coastlines.
___________________________
# 2367
Name: Scott, Alan
Correspondence: One of the dominant issues with government today is the craving to regulate without a substantiated valuation of the ultimate consequences. Having visited this pristine area back in the mid-90's twice, we were in awe of the majesty and more critical the linkages between private conservation and agriculture marriage; during our extensive travels of the entire Point Reyes Tomales Bay area from south to north.
It is working because a predominance of the local population are citizens who unconditionally embrace, without intervention from meddling bureaucrats, to a fault (a robust trait), environmental stewardship beyond 100% factor. Today or tomorrow, there will not ever be a government agency in this country that can demonstrate their existence is due to the success of their methodologies notwithstanding the venue.
The examples of abuse and seriously (costly) defective management and deficiency credible oversight by state and federal organization are overwhelming deleterious by the bucket full. Thus, giving further foundation not to allow the government to acquire control or take control away from a vibrant contributing economy. From my perspective, the government has and does not perform quantitative vetting to prove the justification for bureaucratic / political motivation methods under government control could or would be valid, period!
___________________________
# 2368
Name: Cardoza, Ginger
Correspondence: Cynthia MacLeod, Acting Superintendent
Point Reyes National Seashore
National Park Service
1 Bear Valley Road
Point Reyes Station, CA 94956
RE: General Management Plan Amendment for Point Reyes National Seashore
Dear Ms. MacLeod:
I am writing to provide input on the General Management Plan Amendment for Point Reyes National Seashore (PRNS). I support the continued operation of beef and dairy ranching operations under agricultural lease/permits with 20-year terms and improved management of the Tule elk herds to eliminate negative impacts on the environment and ranching families.
Ranchers have been raising cattle in Point Reyes for more than 150-years. It was ranchers' willingness to sell their properties to the federal government that allowed the creation of the PRNS. As part of the agreement, ranchers were supposed to be allowed to continue ranching on their family ranches within the PRNS.
The ranches in West Marin contribute significantly to the local economy and the local culture. According to any analysis by U.C. Cooperative Extension in 2009, ranches in PRNS and Golden Gate National Recreation Area (GGNRA) directly provide approximately 65 jobs and provide livelihoods for an additional 25 ranch family members. Additionally, agriculture in PRNS and GGNRA account for 17 percent of the agricultural income in Marin County. These jobs and income would be lost if further restrictions were placed on ranches within PRNS. These ranches are not just creating economic value, they are producing high quality food appreciated by consumers locally, regionally, and nationally. Further, providing 20-year terms for lease/permits allows for greater investment in improvements on these ranches. Shorter terms prevent the ability of ranchers to obtain financing for improvements.
would also like to see improved management of the PRNS elk herds. Elk cause thousands of dollars of damages and lost forage on ranches. Additionally, the elk carry Johne’s disease, which can be transmitted to cattle. USDA estimates that lost productivity from Johne’s disease in dairy cattle could be costing dairy producers between $200 and $250 million annually. Elk in the PRNS were reintroduced by humans and have been managed since their reintroduction. PRNS must improve its management by maintaining the roaming elk herds on the Limantour wilderness and preventing them from damaging ranches in the area. Additionally, PRNS should ensure that there is proper forage and water available to the herd in the Limantour wilderness to prevent a reoccurrence of the unfortunate loss of elk during the drought.
Ranches on PRNS provide important economic, cultural, and ecological values to the local community. Losing a significant portion of West Marin’s agricultural community would mean not only a loss of local food production, but a significant loss to its economy and culture. I urge you to offer 20-year lease/permits to ranchers on PRNS and to improve elk management and return the elk to the wilderness areas where they will not impact the ranches.
___________________________
# 2369
Name: Roche, David
Correspondence: It is critical that ranching be allowed in the park. Farmers are the original environmentalists and as stewards of the land make sure that the land is properly taken care of for the long term benefit of all.
Food does not come from the store (or the community garden by your local library) but from the industry that made California great (well before the Silicon Valley).
It is becoming more and more difficult for farmers to ply their trade and when there is an opportunity for both farmers and nature lovers to coexist the parks should be the first to embrace this.
In the strongest way possible I urge you to do the right thing and support the people who feed our country and the world.
Most Respectfully,
David Roche
___________________________
# 2370
Name: Turko, Amy
Correspondence: Extend the leases for Pt. Reyes ranches. Work with them to promote stewardship of the land. Privatization of public land is a reality on our horizon. These ranchers know their land intimately and understand the fragility of the Pt. Reyes ecosystems. It is foolish to think that the human imprint can be erased. Keeping the ranches, working together for mutual benefit, public access, and developing a world class model of land stewardship, sustainable farming, alternative energies, fog harvesting, alongside NOOA and other federal research organizations can be a huge win for literally everyone on Earth. Make it work with the ranch lease extensions.
___________________________
# 2371
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Alyssa Caralla
___________________________
# 2372
Name: Sullivan, Adrianna P
Correspondence: Please allow the Elk to continue to graze and exist on the land. Grazing and keeping the grasses and plants in check very important. Grazing allows us to see wild flowers in the spring among many other things....please do not let politics get in the way. Look what has happened to Santa Rosa Island in Santa Barbara!
___________________________
# 2373
Name: Cleveland, Randall
Correspondence: STOP ALL ranching within Point Reyes Nat'l Seashore, and do not allow the PRNS's elk herd to be "managed" to accommodate ranchers, dairy operations or trophy/recreational killing.
We've come a long way from 150 years ago dark ages when we thought grazing on public lands was a good idea. Now, we know it has huge adverse impacts. Accordingly, in many areas, to protect what's left of the public lands' natural resources, grazing is being phased out, as it should be. But even more important and pressing, is the absurdity of still allowing any grazing in National Parks or Seashores, especially those as marvelous and iconic as Point Reyes.
Please do not be suckered in with the "bogus rationale" of "agricultural heritage." "Heritage" is a weak claim and should not be trumped by harmful private operations. Slavery, child labor, women's right to vote, and so many more horrific activities were also our "heritage." We've learned our lessons; let's honor the "heritage" of progress with change and improve when it's obviously called for. Point Reyes National Seashore needs to return to its true past- -a natural resource without the harm of private commercial operations.
___________________________
# 2374
Name: Steele, Steven D
Correspondence: I am writing to provide input on the General Management Plan Amendment for Point Reyes National Seashore (PRNS). I support the continued operation of beef and dairy ranching operations under agricultural lease/permits with 20-year terms and improved management of the Tule elk herds to eliminate negative impacts on the environment and ranching families.
Ranchers have been raising cattle in Point Reyes for more than 150-years. It was ranchers' willingness to sell their properties to the federal government that allowed the creation of the PRNS. As part of the agreement, ranchers were supposed to be allowed to continue ranching on their family ranches within the PRNS.
The ranches in West Marin contribute significantly to the local economy and the local culture. According to any analysis by U.C. Cooperative Extension in 2009, ranches in PRNS and Golden Gate National Recreation Area (GGNRA) directly provide approximately 65 jobs and provide livelihoods for an additional 25 ranch family members. Additionally, agriculture in PRNS and GGNRA account for 17 percent of the agricultural income in Marin County. These jobs and income would be lost if further restrictions were placed on ranches within PRNS. These ranches are not just creating economic value, they are producing high quality food appreciated by consumers locally, regionally, and nationally. Further, providing 20-year terms for lease/permits allows for greater investment in improvements on these ranches. Shorter terms prevent the ability of ranchers to obtain financing for improvements.
would also like to see improved management of the PRNS elk herds. Elk cause thousands of dollars of damages and lost forage on ranches. Additionally, the elk carry Johne’s disease, which can be transmitted to cattle. USDA estimates that lost productivity from Johne’s disease in dairy cattle could be costing dairy producers between $200 and $250 million annually. Elk in the PRNS were reintroduced by humans and have been managed since their reintroduction. PRNS must improve its management by maintaining the roaming elk herds on the Limantour wilderness and preventing them from damaging ranches in the area. Additionally, PRNS should ensure that there is proper forage and water available to the herd in the Limantour wilderness to prevent a reoccurrence of the unfortunate loss of elk during the drought.
Ranches on PRNS provide important economic, cultural, and ecological values to the local community. Losing a significant portion of West Marin’s agricultural community would mean not only a loss of local food production, but a significant loss to its economy and culture. I urge you to offer 20-year lease/permits to ranchers on PRNS and to improve elk management and return the elk to the wilderness areas where they will not impact the ranches.
___________________________
# 2375
Name: Michener, Carol
Correspondence: Come on, folks. We cannot have all of California unmanaged wilderness. The ag at Point Reyes is part of it's charm and does not detract from the wild areas. In fact, the ag at Point Reyes ads to it's beauty.
Personally, I grow timber on 160 acres. I manage my forest for invasive species, erosion control, diversity, health and beauty. My forest is beautiful, and any city person would think they were in a beautiful park should they visit. My neighbors are pot growers and care nothing for the land. Their forests are overgrown, heavily shaded, with standing dead trees and only those plants that will grow in the heavy shade. Their forests are extremely flammable, dominated by the tallest species, and empty of wildlife as there is no food on the forest floor. This is what lack of management does.
The management of my beautiful property is paid for by myself, because it is in my best interests to have the forest healthy and strong. If my place were to become managed by a govt. agency the public would pay for its management, and not much of that would happen, based on government's track record. My forest would revert to an overcrowded, sickly, Douglas fir monoculture, without diversity, without wildlife, and without beauty.
Please don't let a minority force change that the average person knows nothing about and cares nothing about. Please do not destroy family businesses in the name of "nature". Please be the "wolves" to manage the Elk herd so they do not destroy the very land they live on. We who live in nature and deal with it daily understand now nature works, and neglect is not the answer to a health environment. The ag at Point Reyes has been there for a long time, and it is beautiful to the eye right now, partly because of the ranchers care and maintenance. Do not destroy that for a minority opinion based on no science.
Thank you.
___________________________
# 2376
Name: Nakama, Susan
Correspondence: I support Farming and Ranching in California. Do NOT restrict, eliminate or make it cost-prohibitive to continue their operations.
___________________________
# 2377
Name: Sack, Gary
Correspondence: RE: General Management Plan Amendment for Point Reyes National Seashore
Dear Ms. MacLeod:
I wish to provide input on the Point Reyes National Seashore (PRNS) General Management Plan Amendment. I support the continued operation of beef and dairy ranching operations under agricultural lease/permits with 20-year terms and improved management of the Tule Elk herds to eliminate negative impacts on the environment and ranching families.
Ranchers have been raising cattle in Point Reyes for more than 150-years. The willingness of ranchers to sell their properties to the federal government allowed the creation of the PRNS. The agreement allowed the continued ranching on those family ranches within the PRNS.
West Marin ranches contribute significantly to the local economy and the local culture. According to a 2009 U.C. Cooperative Extension analysis, ranches in PRNS and Golden Gate National Recreation Area (GGNRA) directly provide scores of jobs and provide livelihoods for an additional 25 ranch family members. Additionally, agriculture in PRNS and GGNRA account for 17 percent of the agricultural income in Marin County. These jobs and income would be lost if further restrictions were placed on ranches within PRNS.
the economic value is the cultural value of the ranching and farming inside the park. People and politicians claim to that local farming and ranching is highly desirable. People want their food produced locally. Ranching leads to environmental and wildlife benefits, too.
heard a rancher talk about the Scotch Broom weed problem that is managed much better on private land than on government managed land.
To help keep farmers farming, providing 20-year terms for lease/permits allows for greater investment in improvements on these ranches. Shorter terms prevent the ability of ranchers to obtain financing for improvements.
The Park Service must do a better job of managing the elk herds. Poor management of the herds, I understand is a violation of the agreement. It causes thousands of dollars of damages and lost forage on ranches. Additionally, the Johne's disease, carried by elk, causes a loss of productivity in cattle.
in the PRNS were reintroduced by humans and have been managed since their reintroduction. PRNS must improve its management by maintaining the roaming elk herds on the Limantour wilderness and preventing them from damaging ranches in the area. Additionally, PRNS should ensure that there is proper forage and water available to the herd in the Limantour wilderness to prevent a reoccurrence of the unfortunate loss of elk during the drought.
Ranches on PRNS provide important economic, cultural, and ecological values to the local community. Losing a significant portion of West Marin’s agricultural community would mean not only a loss of local food production, but a significant loss to its economy and culture. I urge you to offer 20-year lease/permits to ranchers on PRNS and to improve elk management and return the elk to the wilderness areas where they will not impact the ranches.
Sincerely,
Gary Sack
___________________________
# 2378
Name: Stine, Rodney M
Correspondence: In revising the Gerneral Management Plan, the National Park Service must compare the cost/benefit of ranching in Point Reyes compared to the cost/benefit of stopping the ranching. It does not make sense to prevent ranching if the land is not going to be used in a cost/benefit manner for some other activity. To stop the use of the land for ranching that has existed for 150 years and then to allow the land to become fallow with mimium public visitors each year does not provide a public benefit, but a public expense. The National Park Service should be sure that land is restricted from the current ranching activity that the new activity will provide a public benefit equal to or exceeding the current use.
___________________________
# 2379
Name: Brooks, Jill T
Correspondence: I would like to stress Ms. MacLeod's comments (below) regarding the elk. In addition, any actions reducing this state's agricultural base should be very strenuously discouraged. Once lost, farms and ranches cannot be replaced. I regret I am not as eloquent as Ms. MacLeod, nor do I have access to all her facts, but I feel strongly enough about this issue to stress:
(Quoting:
would also like to see improved management of the PRNS elk herds. Elk cause thousands of dollars of damages and lost forage on ranches. Additionally, the elk carry Johne's disease, which can be transmitted to cattle. USDA estimates that lost productivity from Johne’s disease in dairy cattle could be costing dairy producers between $200 and $250 million annually. Elk in the PRNS were reintroduced by humans and have been managed since their reintroduction. PRNS must improve its management by maintaining the roaming elk herds on the Limantour wilderness and preventing them from damaging ranches in the area. Additionally, PRNS should ensure that there is proper forage and water available to the herd in the Limantour wilderness to prevent a reoccurrence of the unfortunate loss of elk during the drought.
Ranches on PRNS provide important economic, cultural, and ecological values to the local community. Losing a significant portion of West Marin’s agricultural community would mean not only a loss of local food production, but a significant loss to its economy and culture. I urge you to offer 20-year lease/permits to ranchers on PRNS and to improve elk management and return the elk to the wilderness areas where they will not impact the ranches.
Finally, anything you can do to protect my privacy and contact information would be appreciated and appropriate, given the current hacking incidents.
___________________________
# 2380
Name: Starkweather, Catherine
Correspondence:
Dear Superintendent,
Please protect the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore. My husband and I have been planning a trip to California in 2018, and one of the things we wanted to see were these elk.
Proper management of a herd is one thing, but trying to wipe them out in order for ranchers to run more cattle on public lands is another. I object to any fencing, sterilization or killing of elk in the park.
Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species. And this goes for any other domestic animals.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
___________________________
# 2381
Name: Webster, Al
Correspondence: Public Comment on Change of General Rule for Farming at Point Reyes and Elk management.
The Farm owners should be able to manage their own lands. They've been doing this successfully for many years. The Environmental community has far too much over-reach. It must be stopped. The Environmental Protection Agency and it's members so not pay the mortgage, pay the taxes, care for the land! They do not provide any factual evidence that they are better qualified to determine how the land should be tended. They should not have any say. Farmers and Ranchers are the best care takers of the Land. They have been doing it for hundreds of years!
___________________________
# 2382
Name: Wooster, Jane
Correspondence: Point Reyes National Seashore
National Park Service
1 Bear Valley Road
Point Reyes Station, CA 94956
RE: General Management Plan Amendment for Point Reyes National Seashore
Dear Ms. MacLeod:
I am writing to provide input on the General Management Plan Amendment.
In my world your word is your bond. If you made a promise, you keep it. We expect the same of our government. The United States of America made an agreement to continue to allow ranching in Point Reyes and ranchers should be allowed to continue to do so.
I support the continued operation of beef and dairy ranching operations in the Point Reyes National Seashore (PRNS) under agricultural lease/permits with 20-year terms and improved management of the Tule elk herds to eliminate negative impacts on the environment and ranching families.
Ranchers have been raising cattle in Point Reyes for more than 150-years. It was ranchers' willingness to sell their properties to the federal government that allowed the creation of the PRNS. As part of the agreement, ranchers were supposed to be allowed to continue ranching on their family ranches within the PRNS.
a cattleman whose property is periodically overrun with elk I would also like to see improved management of the PRNS elk herds. Elk cause thousands of dollars of damages and lost forage on ranches. Elk in the PRNS were reintroduced by humans and have been poorly managed since their reintroduction. PRNS must improve its management by maintaining the roaming elk herds on the Limantour wilderness and prevent them from damaging ranches in the area. Additionally, PRNS should ensure that there is proper forage and water available to the herd in the Limantour wilderness to prevent a reocurrence of the unfortunate loss of elk during the drought.
Ranches on PRNS provide important economic, cultural, and ecological values to the local community. Losing a significant portion of West Marin’s agricultural community would mean not only a loss of local food production, but a significant loss to its economy and culture. I urge you to offer renewable twenty year leases to ranchers on PRNS and to improve elk management and return the elk to the wilderness areas where they will not impact the private enterprise.
Stand up and do what's right.
___________________________
# 2383
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: Dear Sir,
I believe the ranches within the Point Reyes National Seashore should be allowed to remain without undue government regulations.The ranches were there before the Park existed & should remain a part of the Park heritage.
Thank you
Marc Kiefer
___________________________
# 2384
Name: Pantaleoni, Darin V
Correspondence: Cynthia MacLeod, Acting Superintendent
Point Reyes National Seashore
National Park Service
1 Bear Valley Road
Point Reyes Station, CA 94956
RE: General Management Plan Amendment for Point Reyes National Seashore
Dear Ms. MacLeod:
I am writing to provide input on the General Management Plan Amendment for Point Reyes National Seashore (PRNS). I support the continued operation of beef and dairy ranching operations under agricultural lease/permits with 20-year terms and improved management of the Tule elk herds to eliminate negative impacts on the environment and ranching families.
Ranchers have been raising cattle in Point Reyes for more than 150-years. It was ranchers' willingness to sell their properties to the federal government that allowed the creation of the PRNS. As part of the agreement, ranchers were supposed to be allowed to continue ranching on their family ranches within the PRNS.
The ranches in West Marin contribute significantly to the local economy and the local culture. According to any analysis by U.C. Cooperative Extension in 2009, ranches in PRNS and Golden Gate National Recreation Area (GGNRA) directly provide approximately 65 jobs and provide livelihoods for an additional 25 ranch family members. Additionally, agriculture in PRNS and GGNRA account for 17 percent of the agricultural income in Marin County. These jobs and income would be lost if further restrictions were placed on ranches within PRNS. These ranches are not just creating economic value, they are producing high quality food appreciated by consumers locally, regionally, and nationally. Further, providing 20-year terms for lease/permits allows for greater investment in improvements on these ranches. Shorter terms prevent the ability of ranchers to obtain financing for improvements.
would also like to see improved management of the PRNS elk herds. Elk cause thousands of dollars of damages and lost forage on ranches. Additionally, the elk carry Johne’s disease, which can be transmitted to cattle. USDA estimates that lost productivity from Johne’s disease in dairy cattle could be costing dairy producers between $200 and $250 million annually. Elk in the PRNS were reintroduced by humans and have been managed since their reintroduction. PRNS must improve its management by maintaining the roaming elk herds on the Limantour wilderness and preventing them from damaging ranches in the area. Additionally, PRNS should ensure that there is proper forage and water available to the herd in the Limantour wilderness to prevent a reoccurrence of the unfortunate loss of elk during the drought.
Ranches on PRNS provide important economic, cultural, and ecological values to the local community. Losing a significant portion of West Marin’s agricultural community would mean not only a loss of local food production, but a significant loss to its economy and culture. I urge you to offer 20-year lease/permits to ranchers on PRNS and to improve elk management and return the elk to the wilderness areas where they will not impact the ranches.
___________________________
# 2385
Name: Quiroz, Cesar
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Background
The National Park Service is updating its park planning and may kill and/or remove elk from Point Reyes at the request of ranchers who enjoy private cattle grazing leases in the park. The Park Service allowed half the park's original elk herd to die during the 2012-2014 drought by fencing them in, and it shot 26 elk in 2015 and 2016. Now it has plans to run elk off of 18,000 acres to allow cattle sole access to these public lands.
The Park Service is also considering allowing conversion of grasslands and wildlife habitat at Point Reyes to artichoke farms and other row crops. The public would lose access to this land, and conversion would destroy wildlife habitat. Also on the table is allowing ranchers to raise sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens and pigs in the park, a disastrous plan that would lead to killing of the park's coyotes and bobcats.
Tell Park Service officials that 1) you object to the removal of any tule elk from their native land, 2) they shouldn't allow row crops or new commercial animal farming, and 3) any cattle ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife.
You can also comment on what levels of cattle ranching are appropriate for Point Reyes National Seashore. Based on the Center's legal settlement with the Park Service, the agency must consider management alternatives that would remove all cattle ranching from the park, remove all dairy cattle operations, or reduce existing ranching operations.
___________________________
# 2386
Name: Burns, David C
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species. You should instead be working to limit and remove private commercial cattle and dairy operations from our public lands.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality and is not in the public interest.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
___________________________
# 2387
Name: Kitzman, Richard B
Correspondence: I would encourage you to allow the farmers and ranchers in the Point Reyes and Tomales Point area to continue to farm their land. These people and their families are the best stewards of the land. Please let them be. Richard & Gloria Kitzman
___________________________
# 2388
Name: Meyer, Paul E
Correspondence: Let's keep some of the elk.
___________________________
# 2389
Name: Levy, Eric
Correspondence: The Point Reyes National Seashore was created in 1962 by the agreement with existing ranchers that their family operations would be able to continue within the park boundaries. The ranches in Point Reyes have been in place for over 150 years.
Please at least consider reduced ranching, if you have to do any thing at all.
___________________________
# 2390
Name: fry, bruce e
Correspondence: I am writing to provide input on the General Management Plan Amendment for Point Reyes National Seashore (PRNS). I support the continued operation of beef and dairy ranching operations under agricultural lease/permits with 20-year terms and improved management of the Tule elk herds to eliminate negative impacts on the environment and ranching families.
Ranchers have been raising cattle in Point Reyes for more than 150-years. It was ranchers' willingness to sell their properties to the federal government that allowed the creation of the PRNS. As part of the agreement, ranchers were supposed to be allowed to continue ranching on their family ranches within the PRNS.
The ranches in West Marin contribute significantly to the local economy and the local culture. According to any analysis by U.C. Cooperative Extension in 2009, ranches in PRNS and Golden Gate National Recreation Area (GGNRA) directly provide approximately 65 jobs and provide livelihoods for an additional 25 ranch family members. Additionally, agriculture in PRNS and GGNRA account for 17 percent of the agricultural income in Marin County. These jobs and income would be lost if further restrictions were placed on ranches within PRNS. These ranches are not just creating economic value, they are producing high quality food appreciated by consumers locally, regionally, and nationally. Further, providing 20-year terms for lease/permits allows for greater investment in improvements on these ranches. Shorter terms prevent the ability of ranchers to obtain financing for improvements.
would also like to see improved management of the PRNS elk herds. Elk cause thousands of dollars of damages and lost forage on ranches. Additionally, the elk carry Johne's disease, which can be transmitted to cattle. USDA estimates that lost productivity from Johne’s disease in dairy cattle could be costing dairy producers between $200 and $250 million annually. Elk in the PRNS were reintroduced by humans and have been managed since their reintroduction. PRNS must improve its management by maintaining the roaming elk herds on the Limantour wilderness and preventing them from damaging ranches in the area. Additionally, PRNS should ensure that there is proper forage and water available to the herd in the Limantour wilderness to prevent a reoccurrence of the unfortunate loss of elk during the drought.
Ranches on PRNS provide important economic, cultural, and ecological values to the local community. Losing a significant portion of West Marin’s agricultural community would mean not only a loss of local food production, but a significant loss to its economy and culture. I urge you to offer 20-year lease/permits to ranchers on PRNS and to improve elk management and return the elk to the wilderness areas where they will not impact the ranches.
___________________________
# 2391
Name: Hoopes, D.C., Robert S
Correspondence: So we are more willing to protect marijuana farming, or the possible solar farming at the expense of real food production. Stop this nonsense. When the whole worlds food production is massively suffering from radiation leakages and poor mismanagement of chemical waste already. This is just another money grab, politically.
Respectfully
___________________________
# 2392
Name: Germann, Dominique
Correspondence: Cynthia MacLeod, Acting Superintendent
Point Reyes National Seashore
National Park Service
1 Bear Valley Road
Point Reyes Station, CA 94956
RE: General Management Plan Amendment for Point Reyes National Seashore
Dear Ms. MacLeod:
I am writing to provide input on the General Management Plan Amendment for Point Reyes National
Seashore (PRNS). I support the continued operation of beef and dairy ranching operations under
agricultural lease/permits with 20-year terms and improved management of the Tule elk herds to
eliminate negative impacts on the environment and ranching families.
Ranchers have been raising cattle in Point Reyes for more than 150-years. It was ranchers' willingness to
sell their properties to the federal government that allowed the creation of the PRNS. As part of the
agreement, ranchers were supposed to be allowed to continue ranching on their family ranches within
the PRNS.
The ranches in West Marin contribute significantly to the local economy and the local culture. According
to any analysis by U.C. Cooperative Extension in 2009, ranches in PRNS and Golden Gate National
Recreation Area (GGNRA) directly provide approximately 65 jobs and provide livelihoods for an
additional 25 ranch family members. Additionally, agriculture in PRNS and GGNRA account for 17
percent of the agricultural income in Marin County. These jobs and income would be lost if further
restrictions were placed on ranches within PRNS. These ranches are not just creating economic value,
they are producing high quality food appreciated by consumers locally, regionally, and nationally.
Further, providing 20-year terms for lease/permits allows for greater investment in improvements on
these ranches. Shorter terms prevent the ability of ranchers to obtain financing for improvements.
I would also like to see improved management of the PRNS elk herds. Elk cause thousands of dollars of
damages and lost forage on ranches. Additionally, the elk carry Johne’s disease, which can be
transmitted to cattle. USDA estimates that lost productivity from Johne’s disease in dairy cattle could be
costing dairy producers between $200 and $250 million annually. Elk in the PRNS were reintroduced by
humans and have been managed since their reintroduction. PRNS must improve its management by
maintaining the roaming elk herds on the Limantour wilderness and preventing them from damaging
ranches in the area. Additionally, PRNS should ensure that there is proper forage and water available to
the herd in the Limantour wilderness to prevent a reoccurrence of the unfortunate loss of elk during the
drought.
Ranches on PRNS provide important economic, cultural, and ecological values to the local community.
Losing a significant portion of West Marin’s agricultural community would mean not only a loss of local
food production, but a significant loss to its economy and culture. I urge you to offer 20-year
lease/permits to ranchers on PRNS and to improve elk management and return the elk to the wilderness
areas where they will not impact the ranches.
As a 3rd generation dairy farmer, this issue concerns me greatly.
Sincerely,
Dominique Germann
___________________________
# 2393
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: I am writing to provide input on the General Management Plan Amendment for Point Reyes National Seashore (PRNS). I support the continued operation of beef and dairy ranching operations under agricultural lease/permits with 20-year terms and improved management of the Tule elk herds to eliminate negative impacts on the environment and ranching families.
Ranchers have been raising cattle in Point Reyes for more than 150-years. It was ranchers' willingness to sell their properties to the federal government that allowed the creation of the PRNS. As part of the agreement, ranchers were supposed to be allowed to continue ranching on their family ranches within the PRNS.
The ranches in West Marin contribute significantly to the local economy and the local culture. According to any analysis by U.C. Cooperative Extension in 2009, ranches in PRNS and Golden Gate National Recreation Area (GGNRA) directly provide approximately 65 jobs and provide livelihoods for an additional 25 ranch family members. Additionally, agriculture in PRNS and GGNRA account for 17 percent of the agricultural income in Marin County. These jobs and income would be lost if further restrictions were placed on ranches within PRNS. These ranches are not just creating economic value, they are producing high quality food appreciated by consumers locally, regionally, and nationally. Further, providing 20-year terms for lease/permits allows for greater investment in improvements on these ranches. Shorter terms prevent the ability of ranchers to obtain financing for improvements.
would also like to see improved management of the PRNS elk herds. Elk cause thousands of dollars of damages and lost forage on ranches. Additionally, the elk carry Johne’s disease, which can be transmitted to cattle. USDA estimates that lost productivity from Johne’s disease in dairy cattle could be costing dairy producers between $200 and $250 million annually. Elk in the PRNS were reintroduced by humans and have been managed since their reintroduction. PRNS must improve its management by maintaining the roaming elk herds on the Limantour wilderness and preventing them from damaging ranches in the area. Additionally, PRNS should ensure that there is proper forage and water available to the herd in the Limantour wilderness to prevent a reoccurrence of the unfortunate loss of elk during the drought.
Ranches on PRNS provide important economic, cultural, and ecological values to the local community. Losing a significant portion of West Marin’s agricultural community would mean not only a loss of local food production, but a significant loss to its economy and culture. I urge you to offer 20-year lease/permits to ranchers on PRNS and to improve elk management and return the elk to the wilderness areas where they will not impact the ranches.
___________________________
# 2394
Name: Hansen, Alan P
Correspondence: To Whom it May Concern,
This country was founded on agriculture and individual striving. Anymore, government seems determined to remove as much land from private endeavors to public use, regardless of lives affected either as established farms or concerns or even economic ramifications. The elimination of oyster farming to appease loud environmental groups regardless of ownership or economics is a sad outcome of this country's established principles. More loud noises from enviromental groups and government follows with plans to further reduce and control traditional land use. Environmentalists are eager to "save" any land they do not live on. At some point, government needs to be strong enough to stand against ever changing societal judgement as to how land is best used. Using present practices and mindset, how long will it be before ever burgeoning populations demand most of private sector land?
Please consider the rights of land and business ownership, the pillars-and tax payers-of the USA.
Sincerely,
Alan P Hansen
___________________________
# 2395
Name: Absher, David
Correspondence: Cynthia MacLeod, Acting Superintendent
Point Reyes National Seashore
National Park Service
1 Bear Valley Road
Point Reyes Station, CA 94956
RE: General Management Plan Amendment for Point Reyes National Seashore
Dear Ms. MacLeod:
I am writing to provide input on the General Management Plan Amendment for Point Reyes National Seashore (PRNS). I support the continued operation of beef and dairy ranching operations under agricultural lease/permits with 20-year terms and improved management of the Tule elk herds to eliminate negative impacts on the environment and ranching families.
Ranchers have been raising cattle in Point Reyes for more than 150-years. It was ranchers' willingness to sell their properties to the federal government that allowed the creation of the PRNS. As part of the agreement, ranchers were supposed to be allowed to continue ranching on their family ranches within the PRNS.
The ranches in West Marin contribute significantly to the local economy and the local culture. According to any analysis by U.C. Cooperative Extension in 2009, ranches in PRNS and Golden Gate National Recreation Area (GGNRA) directly provide approximately 65 jobs and provide livelihoods for an additional 25 ranch family members. Additionally, agriculture in PRNS and GGNRA account for 17 percent of the agricultural income in Marin County. These jobs and income would be lost if further restrictions were placed on ranches within PRNS. These ranches are not just creating economic value, they are producing high quality food appreciated by consumers locally, regionally, and nationally. Further, providing 20-year terms for lease/permits allows for greater investment in improvements on these ranches. Shorter terms prevent the ability of ranchers to obtain financing for improvements.
would also like to see improved management of the PRNS elk herds. Elk cause thousands of dollars of damages and lost forage on ranches. Additionally, the elk carry Johne’s disease, which can be transmitted to cattle. USDA estimates that lost productivity from Johne’s disease in dairy cattle could be costing dairy producers between $200 and $250 million annually. Elk in the PRNS were reintroduced by humans and have been managed since their reintroduction. PRNS must improve its management by maintaining the roaming elk herds on the Limantour wilderness and preventing them from damaging ranches in the area. Additionally, PRNS should ensure that there is proper forage and water available to the herd in the Limantour wilderness to prevent a reoccurrence of the unfortunate loss of elk during the drought.
Ranches on PRNS provide important economic, cultural, and ecological values to the local community. Losing a significant portion of West Marin’s agricultural community would mean not only a loss of local food production, but a significant loss to its economy and culture. I urge you to offer 20-year lease/permits to ranchers on PRNS and to improve elk management and return the elk to the wilderness areas where they will not impact the ranches.
___________________________
# 2396
Name: Reese, Marily
If the public had known at the time of the transition of the private ranch lands to the National Park Service, that a 'bait and switch' would occur to eliminate the active ranching operations that had been assured would continue, it is very likely there would have been no support for the transition of these lands to the NPS. The ranching operations are a rich history of the area, and have been the primary reason the lands are in the pastoral and undeveloped condition they are in. The ranchers could have easily sold to developers, reaped a huge profit and seen the lands forever changed. There could be mansion houses, subdivisions, and shopping centers - as opposed to gorgeous rolling hills under well managed generations of families caring for the lands. It is imperative that the ranching operations be allowed to continue at the levels that existed at the time the lands were transitioned to the NPS, as per the agreement that was made in 1962 with existing ranchers that their family operations would be able to continue within the park boundaries.
___________________________
# 2397
Name: Hoek, Susan K
Correspondence: RE: General Management Plan Amendment for Point Reyes National Seashore
Dear Ms. MacLeod:
I am writing to provide input on the General Management Plan Amendment for Point Reyes National Seashore (PRNS). I support the continued operation of beef and dairy ranching operations under agricultural lease/permits with 20-year terms and improved management of the Tule elk herds to eliminate negative impacts on the environment and ranching families.
Ranchers have been raising cattle in Point Reyes for more than 150-years. It was ranchers' willingness to sell their properties to the federal government that allowed the creation of the PRNS. As part of the agreement, ranchers were supposed to be allowed to continue ranching on their family ranches within the PRNS.
The ranches in West Marin contribute significantly to the local economy and the local culture. According to any analysis by U.C. Cooperative Extension in 2009, ranches in PRNS and Golden Gate National Recreation Area (GGNRA) directly provide approximately 65 jobs and provide livelihoods for an additional 25 ranch family members. Additionally, agriculture in PRNS and GGNRA account for 17 percent of the agricultural income in Marin County. These jobs and income would be lost if further restrictions were placed on ranches within PRNS. These ranches are not just creating economic value, they are producing high quality food appreciated by consumers locally, regionally, and nationally. Further, providing 20-year terms for lease/permits allows for greater investment in improvements on these ranches. Shorter terms prevent the ability of ranchers to obtain financing for improvements.
would also like to see improved management of the PRNS elk herds. Elk cause thousands of dollars of damages and lost forage on ranches. Additionally, the elk carry Johne’s disease, which can be transmitted to cattle. USDA estimates that lost productivity from Johne’s disease in dairy cattle could be costing dairy producers between $200 and $250 million annually. Elk in the PRNS were reintroduced by humans and have been managed since their reintroduction. PRNS must improve its management by maintaining the roaming elk herds on the Limantour wilderness and preventing them from damaging ranches in the area. Additionally, PRNS should ensure that there is proper forage and water available to the herd in the Limantour wilderness to prevent a reoccurrence of the unfortunate loss of elk during the drought.
Ranches on PRNS provide important economic, cultural, and ecological values to the local community. Losing a significant portion of West Marin’s agricultural community would mean not only a loss of local food production, but a significant loss to its economy and culture. I urge you to offer 20-year lease/permits to ranchers on PRNS and to improve elk management and return the elk to the wilderness areas where they will not impact the ranches.
___________________________
# 2398
Name: GILBERT, ANTHONY C
Correspondence: Continued ranching/farming in the Park should be valued very highly and at least as highly as any other authorized usage of Park lands. Ranching on the Point has been carried out for the benefit of the ranchers and the greater community for more than a century, has significant environmental and aesthetic benefits, and is essential to the continuation of ranching/farming elsewhere in Marin. The value to society of the recently introduced elk herd is minimal. Continuation of that herd should be strictly managed so that it does not interfere with or diminish in any way continued sustainable, economically rewarding ranching/farming on the Point.
I support the NPS "initial proposal" but with the foregoing emphasis, ranches over elk, and with the following additions:
- -The initial proposal appears to be specifically tied to support for existing ranch families. This limitation is unnecessary and potentially defeats the goal of very long term continuation of ranching/farming on the Point. Today's ranch families should be free to transfer their ranch interests to appropriate non-family members including entities that would facilitate the basic goal of prosperous long term well managed ranch operations.
- -The NPS proposal limits the duration of ranch leases/permits to a maximum of 20 years. This limitation could become an acute problem during the middle to later stages of an existing lease when the remaining duration of the lease/permit is too short to permit long term planning of capital investment or changes in ranch operations. A more rational approach would provide for much longer terms subject to reduction in case of mismanagement or for 20 year leases with provision for extension at the option of the rancher subject to good management. All such leases/permits should be transferrable subject to reasonable review and approval by the NPS.
___________________________
# 2399
Name: Jones, Brenna N
Correspondence: Cynthia MacLeod, Acting Superintendent
Point Reyes National Seashore
National Park Service
1 Bear Valley Road
Point Reyes Station, CA 94956
RE: General Management Plan Amendment for Point Reyes National Seashore
Dear Ms. MacLeod:
I am writing to provide input on the General Management Plan Amendment for Point Reyes National Seashore (PRNS). I support the continued operation of beef and dairy ranching operations under agricultural lease/permits with 20-year terms and improved management of the Tule elk herds to eliminate negative impacts on the environment and ranching families.
Ranchers have been raising cattle in Point Reyes for more than 150-years. It was ranchers' willingness to sell their properties to the federal government that allowed the creation of the PRNS. As part of the agreement, ranchers were supposed to be allowed to continue ranching on their family ranches within the PRNS.
The ranches in West Marin contribute significantly to the local economy and the local culture. According to any analysis by U.C. Cooperative Extension in 2009, ranches in PRNS and Golden Gate National Recreation Area (GGNRA) directly provide approximately 65 jobs and provide livelihoods for an additional 25 ranch family members. Additionally, agriculture in PRNS and GGNRA account for 17 percent of the agricultural income in Marin County. These jobs and income would be lost if further restrictions were placed on ranches within PRNS. These ranches are not just creating economic value, they are producing high quality food appreciated by consumers locally, regionally, and nationally. Further, providing 20-year terms for lease/permits allows for greater investment in improvements on these ranches. Shorter terms prevent the ability of ranchers to obtain financing for improvements.
would also like to see improved management of the PRNS elk herds. Elk cause thousands of dollars of damages and lost forage on ranches. Additionally, the elk carry Johne’s disease, which can be transmitted to cattle. USDA estimates that lost productivity from Johne’s disease in dairy cattle could be costing dairy producers between $200 and $250 million annually. Elk in the PRNS were reintroduced by humans and have been managed since their reintroduction. PRNS must improve its management by maintaining the roaming elk herds on the Limantour wilderness and preventing them from damaging ranches in the area. Additionally, PRNS should ensure that there is proper forage and water available to the herd in the Limantour wilderness to prevent a reoccurrence of the unfortunate loss of elk during the drought.
Ranches on PRNS provide important economic, cultural, and ecological values to the local community. Losing a significant portion of West Marin’s agricultural community would mean not only a loss of local food production, but a significant loss to its economy and culture. I urge you to offer 20-year lease/permits to ranchers on PRNS and to improve elk management and return the elk to the wilderness areas where they will not impact the ranches.
___________________________
# 2400
Name: Spinelli, Robert
Correspondence: Stay what was originally promised to the ranchers and farmers. It is really diapointing that that the Park service is flexing their muscle.
___________________________
# 2401
Name: Kingdon , Heather T
Correspondence: In 1962 I resided in Bolinas, Ca and witnessed the transformation of Pt Reyes Seashore area go from a productive dairy and ranching/ farming community to a park that has become overgrown with brush and heavy sedges.
The pastoral views that so many equate with a healthy environment have disappeared.
In viewing this situation holistically the park must and should include the heritage of these responsible ranchers as they relate to thier environment and the cultural history of this beautiful area.
As we have witnessed in other vast sections of Ca. the neglect of the environment in the name of preservation and carbon sequestration has not been successful... massive wildfires, erosion and poor soil health abound.
It has been proven that these ranching people are responsible and caring for the land and their animals.
So it is my wish that these people be allowed to continue their way of life in this area.
Thank you
Heather Kingdon
___________________________
# 2402
Name: Olds, Kevin D
Correspondence: This park would gave never happen without the cooperation from these family ranches. Now the park service changes the plan. Really! You deserve to honor the original agreement.
___________________________
# 2403
Name: Wirts, Joni R
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species. Honestly, the world does not need more beef. Cattle ranching only benefits the rancher and is a disservice to the environment and therefore the public.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Joni Wirts
___________________________
# 2404
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence:
RE: General Management Plan Amendment for Point Reyes National Seashore
Dear Ms. MacLeod:
I am writing to provide input on the General Management Plan Amendment for Point Reyes National Seashore (PRNS). I support the continued operation of beef and dairy ranching operations under agricultural lease/permits with 20-year terms and improved management of the Tule elk herds to eliminate negative impacts on the environment and ranching families.
Ranchers have been raising cattle in Point Reyes for more than 150-years. It was ranchers willingness to sell their properties to the federal government that allowed the creation of the PRNS. As part of the agreement, ranchers were supposed to be allowed to continue ranching on their family ranches within the PRNS.
The ranches in West Marin contribute significantly to the local economy and the local culture. According to any analysis by U.C. Cooperative Extension in 2009, ranches in PRNS and Golden Gate National Recreation Area (GGNRA) directly provide approximately 65 jobs and provide livelihoods for an additional 25 ranch family members. Additionally, agriculture in PRNS and GGNRA account for 17 percent of the agricultural income in Marin County. These jobs and income would be lost if further restrictions were placed on ranches within PRNS. These ranches are not just creating economic value, they are producing high quality food appreciated by consumers locally, regionally, and nationally. Further, providing 20-year terms for lease/permits allows for greater investment in improvements on these ranches. Shorter terms prevent the ability of ranchers to obtain financing for improvements.
would also like to see improved management of the PRNS elk herds. Elk cause thousands of dollars of damages and lost forage on ranches. Additionally, the elk carry Johnes disease, which can be transmitted to cattle. USDA estimates that lost productivity from Johnes disease in dairy cattle could be costing dairy producers between $200 and $250 million annually. Elk in the PRNS were reintroduced by humans and have been managed since their reintroduction. PRNS must improve its management by maintaining the roaming elk herds on the Limantour wilderness and preventing them from damaging ranches in the area. Additionally, PRNS should ensure that there is proper forage and water available to the herd in the Limantour wilderness to prevent a reoccurrence of the unfortunate loss of elk during the drought.
Ranches on PRNS provide important economic, cultural, and ecological values to the local community. Losing a significant portion of West Marins agricultural community would mean not only a loss of local food production, but a significant loss to its economy and culture. I urge you to offer 20-year lease/permits to ranchers on PRNS and to improve elk management and return the elk to the wilderness areas where they will not impact the ranches.
Please we need to stop turning a blind eye to the obvious . We need our ranchers and farmers . Why do we continue to pick on the 1% of the population that feeds us. The environmental groups just have the compacity and free time to scream louder . But it doesn't make them right.
Thank you for time,
Jill
___________________________
# 2405
Name: Darling, Carrie
Correspondence: I am writing to express my support keep all protections for tule elk, and I object to removing the elk from Point Reyes. Tule elk are an important part of restoring native species and ecosystems which should be the mission of the National Park Service.
I am against any plans to allow the cattle industry any more power and they should not be allowed to lease wildlife habitats that are so crucial to keep tule elk and other wildlife free and safe.
The National Park Service should also not allow row crops or any new commercial animal farming.
It is time for the National Park Service to protect America's wildlife and stop taking the side of Big Industries that are wrecking havoc to our lands and environment.
Please protect the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Carrie Darling
___________________________
# 2406
Name: Cather, Katie
Correspondence: Regarding the Gen Mngmt Plan Amendmt for Pt Reyes Nat'l Seashore:
are strongly support a complete DISCONTINUANCE as soon as possible of any further cattle or dairy ranching operations via agriculture leasing or permitting. Also, we are strongly opposed to any management of Tule elk herds (which is what we try to see and photograph when we visit the area). Ranchers and dairy folks may claim that the magnificent elk are not native species, but actually, they are. The true NON-natives are cattle and dairy cows.
For over 150 years, ranchers have more than reaped rewards and profits from not having to pay property taxes on our lands- -it's way past time for them to "vacate the premises" and allow us citizens to enjoy our iconic, rare, and exquisite Pt Reyes National Seashore that rightfully belongs to us.
Tourists and visitors contribute to the local economy vastly more than cattle or ranching operations do. Red meat and dairy products are on many physicians "do not eat" lists. In terms of "unnatural," what other species consumes products made from a lactating mother who's milk is intended solely for its own young? As more people turn to plant-based diets, ranchers and dairies will sell to foreign countries. Is this how we want our country's National Parks to be exploited?
Marin and Sonoma counties have more than enough private grazing lands should ranchers and dairy industry people insist on continuing their operations in the region. However, the National Park system has no obligation to fund or subsidize ranchers or dairy folks who have benefited from extremely low grazing costs on our Pt Reyes National Seashore for over 1.5 decades. They've overstayed their welcome and must go- -immediately.
Thank you for considering our views.
___________________________
# 2407
Name: Schindler, Kurt C
Correspondence: As a 40 year resident of Marin County, a 69 year resident of the region, and an ardent user of the Poin Reyes National Park and other open space elements of Marin County I unequivocally support maintaining farming and grass land grazing in the Point Reyes National Seashore as it currently exists. The existing ranches represent a major part of the history, culture, financial viability and diversity of our locally developed and supported efforts to preserve this open space for generations and the leases as initially established with the formation the Seashore should be maintained in perpetuity as originally established.
I understand the formation of the Seashore would not have been possible without the collaboration and forethought of the ranching families. I understand the sustainable practices the ranches have engaged in and continue to develop since the formation of the Seashore. I have read the lawsuit filed by the RRI, the Center (for BD), and the WWP and find the representations in the lawsuit without direct merit or application to the Seashore and its founding. Two of the organizations are based out of State, let alone out of the region and do not reflect the local thinking necessary to develop the Seashore and maintain its diversity and from my understanding the third does not reflect the majority support of the community.
Respectfully submitted
Kurt C. Schindler
Mill Valley, Ca.
___________________________
# 2408
Name: Heringer, Jr., Les S
Correspondence:
Dear Park Service,
I think it is wrong to run all the long held users of the Pt Reyes area off of the land. The farmers, dairymen and ranchers have been there for years maintaining the property and there were commitments made to them when the government moved in that they could maintain their operations there. Now the government is going back on its word and any agreements made are apparently not worth the paper they are written on. How do you think the rest of us are going to react when the government wants agreements in our area.
I also think the elk herd should be controlled and the herd kept at "sustainable" levels.
Sincerely,
Les Heringer, Jr.
___________________________
# 2409
Name: Tsyrklevich, Kate
Correspondence: I have been to Point Reyes several times just to see the Elk Herd. Please do the right thing and preserve this natural beautiful phenomenon. These animals are living in their natural environment.
___________________________
# 2410
Name: Reitz, Dale W
Correspondence: It seems to me that dairy farming has worked for the past 100 years at the Historic ranches and I see no reason that it isn't a good fit for the next 100 years. If a cow peeing on a rock at the Point is so environmentally bad, then that must be the case all over the counties and we should just stop dairy farming all together, which, of course, is ludicrous. Every time I go out there, I see people stopped taking pictures of the herds of Elk and cows. We need to preserve that picture for the future. Please let farming continue...it is, after all, the backbone of our country. Thank you for your consideration of my opinion.
Dale Reitz
___________________________
# 2411
Name: Stec, LAura
Correspondence: We are in a changing period in regards to environmental stewardship. Agricultural producation lands are becoming as scarce as open space. Both support the same ideal of protected lands. Farmlands provide connective spaces and habitat for wildlife, watershed, and recreation. Development pressures are high, but farmers are dedicated stewards of the land and excellent partners in achieving the mission of protected land from development. We must protect both. Let the grazing stay!
___________________________
# 2412
Name: Nelson, Gregory T
Correspondence: I am writing to provide input on the General Management Plan Amendment for Point Reyes National Seashore. I support the continued operation of beef and dairy ranging operations under agricultural lease permits with a 20 year terms and improved management of the Tule elk herds to eliminate negative impacts on the environment and ranching families.You have a moral obligation to live up to the original agreements.
___________________________
# 2413
Name: Molho, Randy
Correspondence: I am writing in support of continued farming operations at Point Reyes as agreed to in previous contracts with the ranching families. I believe farmers and ranchers are far better stewards of the land than anyone that has no vested interest in preserving and maintaining the property for the future.
___________________________
# 2414
Name: Jones, Stephanie
Correspondence: The Tule Elk are majestic, magnificent animals and should remain free and unharmed.
___________________________
# 2415
Name: Duro, Albert A
Correspondence: Please protect the agricultural uses at Point Reyes. Thank you.
___________________________
# 2416
Name: Bonzi , Carolyn J
Correspondence: My Parents were promised that they could continue their ranching many years ago. They park has made it difficult with all of their restrictions. They were finally forced to sell the remaining heard they had.
Please don't put another ranch out of business. The ranches are the fabric of th park.
Thank You
___________________________
# 2417
Name: Votek, Joe
Correspondence: Dear Ms. MacLeod:
I am writing to provide input on the General Management Plan Amendment for Point Reyes National Seashore (PRNS). I support the continued operation of beef and dairy ranching operations under agricultural lease/permits with 20-year terms and improved management of the Tule elk herds to eliminate negative impacts on the environment and ranching families.
Ranchers have been raising cattle in Point Reyes for more than 150-years. It was ranchers' willingness to sell their properties to the federal government that allowed the creation of the PRNS. As part of the agreement, ranchers were supposed to be allowed to continue ranching on their family ranches within the PRNS.
The ranches in West Marin contribute significantly to the local economy and the local culture. According to any analysis by U.C. Cooperative Extension in 2009, ranches in PRNS and Golden Gate National Recreation Area (GGNRA) directly provide approximately 65 jobs and provide livelihoods for an additional 25 ranch family members. Additionally, agriculture in PRNS and GGNRA account for 17 percent of the agricultural income in Marin County. These jobs and income would be lost if further restrictions were placed on ranches within PRNS. These ranches are not just creating economic value, they are producing high quality food appreciated by consumers locally, regionally, and nationally. Further, providing 20-year terms for lease/permits allows for greater investment in improvements on these ranches. Shorter terms prevent the ability of ranchers to obtain financing for improvements.
would also like to see improved management of the PRNS elk herds. Elk cause thousands of dollars of damages and lost forage on ranches. Additionally, the elk carry Johne’s disease, which can be transmitted to cattle. USDA estimates that lost productivity from Johne’s disease in dairy cattle could be costing dairy producers between $200 and $250 million annually. Elk in the PRNS were reintroduced by humans and have been managed since their reintroduction. PRNS must improve its management by maintaining the roaming elk herds on the Limantour wilderness and preventing them from damaging ranches in the area. Additionally, PRNS should ensure that there is proper forage and water available to the herd in the Limantour wilderness to prevent a reoccurrence of the unfortunate loss of elk during the drought.
Ranches on PRNS provide important economic, cultural, and ecological values to the local community. Losing a significant portion of West Marin’s agricultural community would mean not only a loss of local food production, but a significant loss to its economy and culture. I urge you to offer 20-year lease/permits to ranchers on PRNS and to improve elk management and return the elk to the wilderness areas where they will not impact the ranches.
___________________________
# 2418
Name: N/A, Leslie
Correspondence: SAVE AGRICULTURE. WE NEED TO KEEP FARMING AND RANCHING IN AMERICA. WE HAVE ENOUGH PARKS. WE NEED THREE THINGS TO SURVICE FOOD, WATER AND SHELTER. FARMING AND RANCHING IS ESSENTIAL TO CALIFORNIA.
___________________________
# 2419
Name: Chrostowski, Paul C
Correspondence: I have been a frequent visitor to PORE over the past 30 years. Additionally I hold a doctorate in environmental engineering and science and thus have an opportunity to view the lands that are the subject of the GMPA with a trained professional eye. There is little uncertainty regarding the degree of environmental impact associated with cattle ranching at PORE. This is visually apparent as evidenced by soil compaction, atmospheric particulate entrainment, animal waste (complete with nutrients and microbial pathogens) inappropriately stockpiled without consideration of runoff or vector control, and the introduction of alien and invasive species through imported forage. The impact of the recent drought on the existing elk herds (not to mention other wildlife) could have been mitigated by expansion of elk habitat to allow better access to water and forage. After a search of both EPA (STORET) and USGS, I was unable to find evidence of a comprehensive monitoring program for appropriate water quality parameters in potentially impacted water bodies including Drakes Estero and Abbotts Lagoon and their tributaries. The evidence (albeit incomplete and sporadic) that does exist notes the impact of cattle husbandry ("The basins with the highest nutrient loading rates and yields had the highest percentage of dairy and (or) ranching impacted land use" (USGS 2006, Kratzner et al, "Assessment of hydrologic and water quality data collected in Abbotts Lagoon watershed, etc". I also note that it is difficult, especially for the public, to obtain even such basic information as BMPs and soil types for the management area. Given the lack of public information, dearth of baseline monitoring data, and apparent impacts, there is little to suggest that continued cattle husbandry at PORE is environmentally sustainable and, in fact, is likely to contribute to further degradation of land and water resources including Tomales, Bolinas, and Bodega Bays. Due to this, I believe that alternatives involving no ranching, reduced ranching and the NEPA-mandated no action alternative should be the only ones to be carried forth in the assessment process.
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# 2420
Name: Brumleve, Tom
Correspondence: Please keep cattle grazing in Point Reyes National Park. Properly managed grazing benefits the grassland, reduces fire hazards, and retains the cultural history of the area. Elk also need to be properly managed.
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# 2421
Name: Anderson, Stacey J
Correspondence: I plead with the park services to consider the impact of ranching on the environment for years to come and adopt the first alternative, which would be to cease all ranching activities on public land and allow the Tule elk to live.
Contrary to agricultural interests and the romantic notion of the rotational grazing movement in Marin (Marin Carbon Project, etc.), there is virtually no science to back this up. A recent meta-analysis of environmental organizations lead by Oxford University found that there is no benefit whatsoever to climate change mitigation through grazing; in fact, it was found to be more harmful than helpful. See http://www.fcrn.org.uk/.../project-files/fcrn_gnc_report.pdf.
In the United States alone, due to activities of the USDA's Wildlife Services and Park Services, we have already obliterated over 60% of all wildlife in order to allow for ranching across vast tracts of public land. The longterm impacts of this invasive species (cattle, not indigenous or necessary) are not understood, but all indicators show that the over 100 million cows in this country occupying almost half of the country are severely impacting climate change. When we remove other "nuisance" species, such as deer, elk, coyotes, wolves, birds, etc. in order to maintain forage for cows, we upset the natural balance and cannot anticipate the longterm impacts on the whole of the environment.
We don't need cows for food, and certainly free range beef does nothing to reduce global food security when it accounts for less than 1% of all protein intakes. It is a "solution" for the elite only. As forward-thinking Marinites, we need to start taking responsibility for our lands and thinking of how we can not only preserve them for generations to come but how they might be an actual solution to the impending global food crisis.
It's easy to get caught up in the notion of supporting agricultural interests that have been around since the 1800's. The coal industry has also been around for as long, but we see now that that is not sustainable. Continuing a practice that supports a handful of families at the cost of the environment is not a choice that an enlightened county should be making. Environmentalists here often cite the fact that the white deer and Tule elk are not indigenous to this land - - but neither are cows. Why do we favor one species over another? It all leads back to economic interests, not environmental ones.
We must begin to take a global approach and stop favoring the activities of a few, but consider the impacts it has for the whole.
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# 2422
Name: Strauss, Emilie
Correspondence: Dear Point Reyes National Seashore,
I am writing in response to the proposed General Management Plan Amendment. I have been fortunate to go to Point Reyes National Seashore (PRNS) since I was a young child, which is prior to the creation of the park. I spent many weekends at Point Reyes hiking and birdwatching. I am grateful to PRNS staff for using good science in their stewardship of this beautiful place.
I think it unfortunate that the elk were released into the ranchlands, but now that they are established I enjoy seeing them and think they are an important part of the fauna. I am glad that PRNS is considering a variety of alternatives for ranchland and wildlife.
At present, some of the draft plan amendment terminology is unclear or incomplete. The EIS should provide more information so that the public can make an informed decision. Specifically, this refers to:
(1) Further definition of what constitutes best management practices,
(2) Further definition of what constitutes a "resource",
(3) Additional language on defining proposed options for tule elk management,
(4) and fleshing out of other terms used in the scoping document such as diversification, operational flexibility, visitor carrying capacities, and improvement of visitors experiences.
I want to make sure that the options that preserve ranching include a guarantee of continued public access. I have been birdwatching the Point Reyes ranchlands for 30 years. During this time, we have lost "birders habitat" as visitation has increased. My general understanding is that PRNS lands are public. My understanding is that we are allowed access for birding as long as we do not disturb livestock or come too close to ranch residences, and of course conform to any other regulations about safety, snowy plover protection, areas closed for marine mammal rookeries, etc. We do our best to self-police. However, I have had some uncomfortable situations. I have had ranchers warn me off from accessing areas east of Abbott's Lagoon because I was disturbing livestock, yet there was no livestock anywhere near where I was. On another time, I was walking with a friend on Sir Francis Drake Boulevard and a rancher came up and rather shrilly said to please stop disturbing the livestock. Again, I respect ranch operations but we were on a public road heavily used by cars. It seemed inappropriate. Also, I have had friends harassed by law enforcement for presence in traditional birding areas. Regardless of the decision, I think it important that language respecting birding uses/continued public access be included as part of the management plan.
The EIS should include examination of dependency on the declining tricolored blackbird and cattle. The "trikes" seem affiliated with the ranchlands. Do dairy operations provide important winter habitat for the species?
Furthermore, if ranchlands are to be retired what are the long-term management plans for weed abatement?
Many thanks for working on these difficult issues. I celebrate the things that work well at Point Reyes - most ranchers are friendly, badgers are numerous, elephant seals are abundant, the former oyster farm is gloriously wild, and the elk are spectacular.
– Emilie
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# 2423
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: Please STOP destroying the diverse natural beauty of the United States. Thank-you.
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# 2424
Name: Rentsch, Colleen
Correspondence: Cynthia MacLeod, Acting Superintendent
Point Reyes National Seashore
National Park Service
1 Bear Valley Road
Point Reyes Station, CA 94956
RE: General Management Plan Amendment for Point Reyes National Seashore
Dear Ms. MacLeod:
I am writing to provide input on the General Management Plan Amendment for Point Reyes National Seashore (PRNS). I support the continued operation of beef and dairy ranching operations under agricultural lease/permits with 20-year terms and improved management of the Tule elk herds to eliminate negative impacts on the environment and ranching families.
Ranchers have been raising cattle in Point Reyes for more than 150-years. It was ranchers' willingness to sell their properties to the federal government that allowed the creation of the PRNS. As part of the agreement, ranchers were supposed to be allowed to continue ranching on their family ranches within the PRNS.
The ranches in West Marin contribute significantly to the local economy and the local culture. According to any analysis by U.C. Cooperative Extension in 2009, ranches in PRNS and Golden Gate National Recreation Area (GGNRA) directly provide approximately 65 jobs and provide livelihoods for an additional 25 ranch family members. Additionally, agriculture in PRNS and GGNRA account for 17 percent of the agricultural income in Marin County. These jobs and income would be lost if further restrictions were placed on ranches within PRNS. These ranches are not just creating economic value, they are producing high quality food appreciated by consumers locally, regionally, and nationally. Further, providing 20-year terms for lease/permits allows for greater investment in improvements on these ranches. Shorter terms prevent the ability of ranchers to obtain financing for improvements.
would also like to see improved management of the PRNS elk herds. Elk cause thousands of dollars of damages and lost forage on ranches. Additionally, the elk carry Johne's disease, which can be transmitted to cattle. USDA estimates that lost productivity from Johne’s disease in dairy cattle could be costing dairy producers between $200 and $250 million annually. Elk in the PRNS were reintroduced by humans and have been managed since their reintroduction. PRNS must improve its management by maintaining the roaming elk herds on the Limantour wilderness and preventing them from damaging ranches in the area. Additionally, PRNS should ensure that there is proper forage and water available to the herd in the Limantour wilderness to prevent a reoccurrence of the unfortunate loss of elk during the drought.
Ranches on PRNS provide important economic, cultural, and ecological values to the local community. Losing a significant portion of West Marin’s agricultural community would mean not only a loss of local food production, but a significant loss to its economy and culture. I urge you to offer 20-year lease/permits to ranchers on PRNS and to improve elk management and return the elk to the wilderness areas where they will not impact the ranches.
Sincerely,
Colleen Rentsch
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# 2425
Name: Jadallah, Sami A
Correspondence: Cynthia MacLeod, Acting Superintendent
Point Reyes National Seashore
National Park Service
1 Bear Valley Road
Point Reyes Station, CA 94956
RE: General Management Plan Amendment for Point Reyes National Seashore
Dear Ms. MacLeod:
I am writing to provide input on the General Management Plan Amendment for Point Reyes National Seashore (PRNS). I support the continued operation of beef and dairy ranching operations under agricultural lease/permits with 20-year terms and improved management of the Tule elk herds to eliminate negative impacts on the environment and ranching families.
Ranchers have been raising cattle in Point Reyes for more than 150-years. It was ranchers' willingness to sell their properties to the federal government that allowed the creation of the PRNS. As part of the agreement, ranchers were supposed to be allowed to continue ranching on their family ranches within the PRNS.
The ranches in West Marin contribute significantly to the local economy and the local culture. According to any analysis by U.C. Cooperative Extension in 2009, ranches in PRNS and Golden Gate National Recreation Area (GGNRA) directly provide approximately 65 jobs and provide livelihoods for an additional 25 ranch family members. Additionally, agriculture in PRNS and GGNRA account for 17 percent of the agricultural income in Marin County. These jobs and income would be lost if further restrictions were placed on ranches within PRNS. These ranches are not just creating economic value, they are producing high quality food appreciated by consumers locally, regionally, and nationally. Further, providing 20-year terms for lease/permits allows for greater investment in improvements on these ranches. Shorter terms prevent the ability of ranchers to obtain financing for improvements.
would also like to see improved management of the PRNS elk herds. Elk cause thousands of dollars of damages and lost forage on ranches. Additionally, the elk carry Johne's disease, which can be transmitted to cattle. USDA estimates that lost productivity from Johne’s disease in dairy cattle could be costing dairy producers between $200 and $250 million annually. Elk in the PRNS were reintroduced by humans and have been managed since their reintroduction. PRNS must improve its management by maintaining the roaming elk herds on the Limantour wilderness and preventing them from damaging ranches in the area. Additionally, PRNS should ensure that there is proper forage and water available to the herd in the Limantour wilderness to prevent a reoccurrence of the unfortunate loss of elk during the drought.
Ranches on PRNS provide important economic, cultural, and ecological values to the local community. Losing a significant portion of West Marin’s agricultural community would mean not only a loss of local food production, but a significant loss to its economy and culture. I urge you to offer 20-year lease/permits to ranchers on PRNS and to improve elk management and return the elk to the wilderness areas where they will not impact the ranches.
___________________________
# 2426
Name: Skidmore, Andrew
Correspondence: Dear Ms. MacLeod:
I am writing to provide input on the General Management Plan Amendment for Point Reyes National Seashore (PRNS). I support the continued operation of beef and dairy ranching operations under agricultural lease/permits with 20-year terms and improved management of the Tule elk herds to eliminate negative impacts on the environment and ranching families.
Ranchers have been raising cattle in Point Reyes for more than 150-years. It was ranchers' willingness to sell their properties to the federal government that allowed the creation of the PRNS. As part of the agreement, ranchers were supposed to be allowed to continue ranching on their family ranches within the PRNS.
The ranches in West Marin contribute significantly to the local economy and the local culture. According to any analysis by U.C. Cooperative Extension in 2009, ranches in PRNS and Golden Gate National Recreation Area (GGNRA) directly provide approximately 65 jobs and provide livelihoods for an additional 25 ranch family members. Additionally, agriculture in PRNS and GGNRA account for 17 percent of the agricultural income in Marin County. These jobs and income would be lost if further restrictions were placed on ranches within PRNS. These ranches are not just creating economic value, they are producing high quality food appreciated by consumers locally, regionally, and nationally. Further, providing 20-year terms for lease/permits allows for greater investment in improvements on these ranches. Shorter terms prevent the ability of ranchers to obtain financing for improvements.
would also like to see improved management of the PRNS elk herds. Elk cause thousands of dollars of damages and lost forage on ranches. Additionally, the elk carry Johne’s disease, which can be transmitted to cattle. USDA estimates that lost productivity from Johne’s disease in dairy cattle could be costing dairy producers between $200 and $250 million annually. Elk in the PRNS were reintroduced by humans and have been managed since their reintroduction. PRNS must improve its management by maintaining the roaming elk herds on the Limantour wilderness and preventing them from damaging ranches in the area. Additionally, PRNS should ensure that there is proper forage and water available to the herd in the Limantour wilderness to prevent a reoccurrence of the unfortunate loss of elk during the drought.
Ranches on PRNS provide important economic, cultural, and ecological values to the local community. Losing a significant portion of West Marin’s agricultural community would mean not only a loss of local food production, but a significant loss to its economy and culture. I urge you to offer 20-year lease/permits to ranchers on PRNS and to improve elk management and return the elk to the wilderness areas where they will not impact the ranches.
___________________________
# 2427
Name: Moore, Melissa L
Correspondence: Please do not allow ranching on the public lands of Point Reyes. Management of Tule elk is inappropriate as they are wild animals who deserve a protected place to roam and live. By allowing ranching, the agency is tacitly supporting corporate benefits over the benefits of wild, natural places and their inhabitants. I have visited Point Reyes many times and cherish this special place.
___________________________
# 2428
Name: Phelan, Ann
Correspondence: I would like to see all ranchers in the Point Reyes National Seashore;beef, dairy and others,to continue ranching and to receive 20 year leases, so they may continue to provide quality products locally and far.
I would like all the roaming Tule elk on the ranches to be re-located to the Limantour wilderness area, as is stated in the original 1998 Alternative A. The elk will have sufficient foraging and water in their wilderness habitat and they help with fire prevention.
The ranchers' depth of experience with the earth is a vital model others can learn from; one of a holistic, sustainable nature/man-as-animal symbiosis. In my opinion the park would benefit from forging out research and legislation that preserves and protects these models for our future.
___________________________
# 2429
Name: Brustman, Thomas
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Thomas Brustman
___________________________
# 2430
Name: perry, Julianne
Correspondence: I support allowing the ranching contract to expire and to let the elk live in their habitat. The proposal to "manage" the elk, which I presume means shooting many of them in the head, is not what California is about. Ranching is decimating our rainforests all over the world and California is looked to as a leader in the environmental movement. Don't make the wrong decision and show the world that we care more about eating beef than handing a healthy planet to our children.
Julianne
___________________________
# 2431
Name: Sawhney , Priya
Correspondence: The Elk should not be "managed" or killed. The National Park services has an obligation to help, not hurt the Elk. The Elk are natives of the park in Point Reyes and we should prioritize their livelihood. Please do not hurt the Elk. Hundreds of activists will take action if needed.
___________________________
# 2432
Name: Goldman, Ateret
Correspondence: Let the Tule Elk live!
___________________________
# 2433
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: Hello! I am writing today to urge you to leave the Tule Elk alone to live and thrive free from human interference and violence. Human sprawl is eliminating wildlife habitat at an alarming rate, and we must take a stand for their right to life and freedom. Thanks for your time.
___________________________
# 2434
Name: Raj, Shymal
Correspondence: Hello,
I learned that the ranching leases for Point Reyes National Park is about to expire and there are proposals being considered as to what to do with the Tule Elk in the park. I am writing today in support of leaving the Tule Elk alone. Not only they are beautiful creatures who deserve to live and thrive freely, they play a critical role in preventing succession of open grasslands to less diverse, shrub-dominated ecosystems. They also have a positive impact on native grassland species abundance and diversity.
Please help protect the Tule Elk.
Thank you,
Shymal Raj
___________________________
# 2435
Name: Carter, Sherry
Correspondence: As A Reminder
People, if we are to call ourselves the most important species on this 1 and only planet, then we must take the responsibility of that by caring for the other animals and land, before we pursue our own agendas. There is nearly no other place in Ca where we can experience Tule Elk. I have photographed them there several times and its a wonderful experience seeing them along the ocean. This plan shouldnt even be considered.
___________________________
# 2436
Name: Goldman, Ora
Correspondence: Hello! I have heard that Ranching leases are about to expire, and the NPS is contemplating five options in regard to the Tule Elk population - one of which is to let the leases expire and leave the elk alone. I would like to urge you to do that- -allow the Tule Elk to live and thrive free from human interference and violence! Human sprawl is eliminating wildlife habitat at an alarming rate, and we must take a stand for their right to life and freedom. Thanks for your time.
Ora Goldman
___________________________
# 2437
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: I support keeping the tule elk herds free-roaming and I am against extermination or any restriction of the elk. They are an important native species and their welfare should be considered above that of commercial interests. We spend enough land, water, and fuel on livestock in this country and certainly have devastated enough native habitat and species for them. Let's not make that mistake here.
Thank you.
___________________________
# 2438
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: The Point Reyes National Seashore, NPS as we now refer to it, was created to prevent the seashore from deminishing and remain undeveloped. Creation of the national seashore was for the purpose of enjoying the shores. Though I'm very much in agreement with not developing the pasturelands either.
It was close knit families and our love of the land that is at the heart of creating this beautiful area. Ranchers knew that careful care and management was and is the only way it will survive and thrive for many generations to come.
Persnonally, my immediate family of 6 generations along with another 4 of my family have ranches and have been here from the beginning. Lots of our blood, sweat and tears have been shed here. So it's with great heart and intrest that i reply to this issue. In order to secure continuing survival for everyone, an Elk Management plan and Renewable 20 Plus year leases are necessary.
I've not read a new Elk management plan since 1998 that would allow maintenance of the growing elk population.
It should be common sense that any creatures wild or domestic be maintained one way or another. As time and experience has well proven that. It's very sad and even angering that we must fight for what is obvious. I remember the building of the elk fence in preperation for their survival and keeping them from destroying our land, fences and feed. We are managing the land with great experience and success. Allowing the free ranging of the elk without boundaries creates a deffinate recipe for disaster.
We can all exist together, but not without planning and effort. Ranchers have been here in this area providing food for each and everyone of you who eat. The percent of the counties food supply is significant enough that the trickle down effect will impact several entities in marin; including schools, taxes, merchant stores and many others. Its not just for one person or group that we all need to survive together it's for everyones future that we come together and work as a team. That being said, its also true that there are some more knowledgeable than others in creating a productive plan. Involving the experts of this land, The Ranchers, will ensure success!
___________________________
# 2439
Name: Willmes, Angela
Correspondence: Let the Elk LIVE!
___________________________
# 2440
Name: kamali, maryam
Correspondence: Hello! I am writing today to urge you to allow the Tule Elk to live and thrive free from human interference and violence. Human sprawl is eliminating wildlife habitat at an alarming rate, and we must take a stand for their right to life and freedom. Thanks for your time.
Maryam
___________________________
# 2441
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: Do not hurt or kill the elk!!
___________________________
# 2442
Name: Maurillo, Gene
Correspondence: Please leave the Tule Elk in Pt. Reyes alone to simply leave their lives without human management in the proposals you have under consideration. Thank you kindly.
___________________________
# 2443
Name: Landon-Jimenez , Donna
Correspondence: You all are supposed to protect America's wildlife and environment, not help to DESTROY IT.
WE DEMAND that you take all necessary steps to protect all & any endangered species and the lands they live in he re in the USA.
___________________________
# 2444
Name: Leffakis, Chloe
Correspondence: Let the Tule Elk live.
___________________________
# 2445
Name: N/A, Matthew
Correspondence:
Hello! I am writing today to urge you to allow the Tule Elk to live and thrive free from human interference and violence. Human sprawl is eliminating wildlife habitat at an alarming rate, and we must take a stand for their right to life and freedom. Thanks for your time.
___________________________
# 2446
Name: Lovejoy, Leana
Correspondence: Please do not "manage" the Elk who live on the public lands at Pt. Reyes National Seashore. We do not need to graze cattle, they are destroying our planet at an alarming rate - we need wild animals... These public lands need to be managed on behalf of biodiversity and to also help guard against climate change. The elk belong there - the cattle do not....
Thank you.
___________________________
# 2447
Name: Giardina, David
Correspondence: Animals are not things. They are sentient, living beings. Please do not use murder as a way to settle land lease issues. Let the elk live. They deserve to just as humans do.
___________________________
# 2448
Name: Faddegon, Ryan W
Correspondence: Leave the Tully Elk of Point Reyes alone. Point Reyes is not point Reyes without elk.
___________________________
# 2449
Name: Fior, Virginia
Correspondence: Hello!
I am writing today to urge you to allow the Tule Elk to live and thrive free from human interference and violence. Human sprawl is eliminating wildlife habitat at an alarming rate, and we must take a stand for their right to life and freedom. Thanks for your time.
Thanks for all you do!
Virgini
___________________________
# 2450
Name: Aguilera, Nick
Correspondence: Please do not "manage" (exterminate) the elk at Point Reyes and do not encourage ranching at Point Reyes, either. Cattle and ranching are not a sustainable source of food production in our country and globally. They consume an incredible amount of resources disproportionate to any "benefit" they provide.
I've spent a lot of time at Point Reyes as a graduate student in the Bay Area. I did not travel to Point Reyes to see cows and dairy production. I go for ocean and for the wildlife.
___________________________
# 2451
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: Let the ranching licenses expire and the tule elk live. You can not see elk almost anywhere else in CA. I enjoy seeing them roam free and they're are not a lot of elk in california only about 3,600.
___________________________
# 2452
Name: Shah, Neerav
Correspondence: Please do not allow leases to impact the elk population of Point Reyes. Let the leases expire and leave the elk population alone.
The ranching leases are not beneficial to the Wonder of nature there and would be tragic to continue reducing elk populations for financial benefit instead of allowing the elk to live without interference.
___________________________
# 2453
Name: Wang, Shiqi
Correspondence: PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE leave the elk reserve alone, protect the elk and let them live!
___________________________
# 2454
Name: Oliver, Jason
Correspondence: Good afternoon!
I am strongly urging the National Park Service to allow the Tule Elk to live free from human interference and violence. Human sprawl is eliminating wildlife habitat at an alarming rate, and we must take a stand for their right to life and freedom. Thanks for your time.
Thanks for all you do!
Best,
Jason
___________________________
# 2455
Name: Lawrence, Jackie
Correspondence: Please let the Tule Elk live. It is cruel to control the population or exterminate them. They are a part of the natural eco-system in Point Reyes. It is very concerning knowing that this is even a consideration of the National Park Service.
___________________________
# 2456
Name: Hsiung, Wayne H
Correspondence: Tule Elk should receive protection, not be targeted with violence. Please allow them to live!
___________________________
# 2457
Name: Mitchel, John O
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
___________________________
# 2458
Name: Dunkovich, Sam
Correspondence: Don't use your authority and American tax dollars to kill Yule elk. Let them live!!!
___________________________
# 2459
Name: Lewis, Judi A
Correspondence: Hello! I am writing today to urge you to allow the Tule Elk to live and thrive free from human interference and violence. Human sprawl is eliminating wildlife habitat at an alarming rate, and we must take a stand for their right to life and freedom. Thanks for your time.
___________________________
# 2460
Name: Silva, Nicholous
Correspondence: Let the Tule Elk Live
___________________________
# 2461
Name: Sharo, Andrew
Correspondence: Dear NPS, I urge you to allow the Tule Elk to live and thrive free from human interference and violence. Human sprawl is eliminating wildlife habitat at an alarming rate, and we must take a stand for their right to life and freedom.
___________________________
# 2462
Name: Cameron, Colleen
Correspondence: In a time where wildlife is being decimated by our human footprint it makes sense to let the leases run out and leave these beautiful places and elk be wild.
Not every thing should be done for profit or money motive.
___________________________
# 2463
Name: Arima, Rachel M
Correspondence: I strongly urge you to protect the Tule Elk and our parks from hunting and other harmful and unnecessary practices. Tule elk are beautiful and intelligent animals with complex lives and, as we have already invaded their homelands and taken so much from them, the least we can do now is keep them safe from our government.
Please don't let the tule elk be hunted and exterminated, or so-called 'managed'. Let them live!
___________________________
# 2464
Name: Sanchez, Linda
Correspondence: Let the Tule Elk live! Animal protection and sanctuary should be a priority!
"Conservation increasingly became one of Roosevelt's main concerns. After becoming president in 1901, Roosevelt used his authority to protect wildlife and public lands by creating the United States Forest Service (USFS) and establishing 150 national forests, 51 federal bird reserves, 4 national game preserves, 5 national parks, and 18 national monuments by enabling the 1906 American Antiquities Act. During his presidency,Theodore Roosevelt protected approximately 230 million acres of public land."
The NPS needs to remember what they are SUPPOSED to do, which is NOT to mirror the destructive agenda of the current, dangerously destructive POTUS
___________________________
# 2465
Name: Gogineni, Apuroopa
Correspondence: Please save elks
___________________________
# 2466
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: Please leave the Tule Elk alone !
___________________________
# 2467
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: Please let the Tule Elk live!
___________________________
# 2468
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: Hello! I am writing today to urge you to allow the Tule Elk to live and thrive free from human interference and violence. Human sprawl is eliminating wildlife habitat at an alarming rate, and we must take a stand for their right to life and freedom. Thanks for your time.
___________________________
# 2469
Name: Eagle, Reverend Jane
Correspondence: The Elk who live in the point Reyes area and the National Park in particular belong to all Americans as part of the Public Trust. We pay you to take care of them for us. We do NOT pay you to kill them so welfare ranchers can use OUR Public Trust lands for free. Get the livestock off OUR land, and leave OUR elk alone. You already killed OUR white deer. Do the job WE the People pay you to do: protect OUR lands and wildlife.
___________________________
# 2470
Name: Goldberg, Michael
Correspondence: Hello! I lived in Inverness for eight years and I have hiked in the Point Reyes National Seashore park since I was 15 - nearly 50 years ago. I am writing today to urge you to allow the Tule Elk to live and thrive free from human interference and violence. Human sprawl is eliminating wildlife habitat at an alarming rate, and we must take a stand for their right to life and freedom.
Thank you for considering this.
Best,
Michael Goldberg
___________________________
# 2471
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: Nation Park Services, please leave the Elks at Point Reyes alone. Please let the lease permits expire and leave the Elks alone.
___________________________
# 2472
Name: Mazzola, Elizabeth
Correspondence: The concept of a Natural Park is to protect wildlife and nature, not to kill wildlife and nature to protect business. How did the admirable and important mission of this agency get turned backwards into villiany? Leave the elk in Point Reyes alone. The ranchers are the ones who must leave. If you go through with this "management" (killing) of the animals who live there, you deceive the public by claiming to work for nature and innocent animals. We the people deserve and demand better.
___________________________
# 2473
Name: Zamora, Ilona L
Correspondence: To whom it may concern,
I write to express my strong condemnation of any plan that would place the great elk of Point Reyes at risk. I ask you to do all in your power to protect these magestic symbols of what makes our part of the world so priceless.
With great sincerety,
Ilona Zamora
___________________________
# 2474
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: As a Bay Area local and frequent visitor to the Point Reyes area, I am writing to urge you to allow the Tule Elks to live and thrive free from human interference and violence. The Tule Elks are a very huge part of this area and beloved by locals and tourists alike. Human sprawl is eliminating wildlife habitat at an alarming rate, and we must take a stand for the Elks' right to life and freedom. Thank you.
___________________________
# 2475
Name: Madruga , Andrea C
Correspondence:
Hello! I am writing today to urge you to leave the Tule Elk alone to live and thrive free from human interference and violence. Human sprawl is eliminating wildlife habitat at an alarming rate, and we must take a stand for their right to life and freedom. Thanks for your time.
Andrea Madruga
___________________________
# 2476
Name: Schmieding , Cody
Correspondence: i do not think that continuing to use tax dollars to move or relocate animals in their environment that has already been shrunk exponentially by us is very well thought out. Also as a voter I will oppose this as much as I can publicly and privately in hopes that these practices are banned.
___________________________
# 2477
Name: Caruthers, Stephanaie
Correspondence: Hello,
My vote is to keep the elk alive and free in the park. Please make a responsible decision not the easy decision.
___________________________
# 2478
Name: Albrecht, Ann
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Ann Albrecht
___________________________
# 2479
Name: Rosenberg, Zoe L
Correspondence: Hello! I am writing today to urge you to allow the Tule Elk to live and thrive free from human interference and violence. Human sprawl is eliminating wildlife habitat at an alarming rate, and we must take a stand for their right to life and freedom. Thanks for your time.
Thanks for all you do!
- Zoe Rosenberg
___________________________
# 2480
Name: Paxton, Kenneth
Correspondence: Please support continued ranching within Point Reyes and management of the park's elk herd to protect the agricultural heritage.
___________________________
# 2481
Name: Barthassat, Quentin
Correspondence: I'm profoundly sad reading that that you would potentially do without the elks at Point Reyes. They are amazing animals, uniques and beautiful. I have spent hours watching them, just being them, living their life in this wonderful landscapes. Please, make everything you can to keep them safe, they are creatures that deserve to live. They are part of this area, the spirit of this, the remaining wildlife.
I also have to say that I was choked by the dairy industry in the park. Trees are cut down, coyotes are killed, deers are killed to make sure we have enough place for livestock. This is terrible. Killing our wildlife in order to exploite some other animals and for money. I was choked seeing calves stuck in their tiny shelves along the road. What is happening? Is that really what you want the people see in a beautiful park. I don't think so.
I'm asking you to do everything you can to protect this gift of life. Protect the wildlife, no matter the price, no matter the economic interests.
___________________________
# 2482
Name: Gnehm, Peggy
Correspondence: It is essential to maintain the farms on Point Reyes.
They're thriving small, local farms who provide excellent local products to their communities. People, in general are too removed from their food supply. Milk comes from the store. There is no awareness of the process or the people who provide their food.
It is essential to maintain this local link
Peggy
___________________________
# 2483
Name: jackson, stewart a
Correspondence: Please manage the Point Reyes target area to preserve the ranching option as well as the elk management.
Realistically we only need enough elk to look at and to perpetuate the herd.
They do not need to be allowed to dominate the area and exclude the historic ranching activity in order to have a continued presence in the area.
Elk are not an endangered species and are abundant and very prolific.
realistic operational procedure would be to manage the herd for sport hunting for a very high fee to defray costs of operating the whole unit , or ranch them as red deer are in New Zealand. Of course this is not a "pleasing" alternative to the bunny huggers of the world.
Do not displace the ranchers who have their grandfather rights and who need to be respected instead of steamrollered.
I have been subjected to retroactive changes in zoning for my farming operation before, and can appreciate the status of the current ranchers in Point Reyes. Please respect their rights.
Elk are plentiful and not in need of expansion. They multiply like rats in all the protected park areas and have to be "pruned" regularly or they eat themselves out of house and home.
Please manage for both .
___________________________
# 2484
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Walker Everette
___________________________
# 2485
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: Let the elk live!
___________________________
# 2486
Name: Harry, Jill
Correspondence: I urge the National Park Service to encourage ranching in Point Reyes and management of elk herds. The Point Reyes National Seashore (PRNS) was created in 1962 by the agreement with existing ranchers that their family operations would be able to continue within the park boundaries. The ranches in Point Reyes have been in place for over 150 years. Please encourage the continuation of ranching!.
___________________________
# 2487
Name: Hellmann, Daniel R
Correspondence: Hello, a few weeks ago I had the chance to see the Tule Elks living at Point Reyes. I have traveled a lot, but this was one of the most spectacular sights I have ever seen. To see these wonderful animals living peacefully without being bothered by the human presence. I have been shocked, when I heard that the park is thinking about changing the way the elks are treated. They should have the possibility to live and flourish in their own ways without human interference. Everything else would be disrespectful and a terrible loss. Thank you for considering this!
___________________________
# 2488
Name: Poncia, Lisa
Correspondence: We are Loren and Lisa Poncia, the owners of Stemple Creek Ranch. We live and work in Marin County and are reaching out to you in support of local agriculture. Loren is a 4th generation rancher in Marin County and specifically left a long and successful career in corporate America to "come home" to his roots and continue his family legacy in Marin County agriculture. That decision was not an easy one, as making a living in agriculture is not for the faint at heart.
When we moved back to Marin County 13 years ago, we did so with the sole purpose and intent of renting Loren's family ranch, starting our own business in production agriculture (beef and lamb), and trying to preserve his family's legacy for the next generation. The last 13 years have not been easy, but we have grown our business, connected with consumers, restaurants, and butcher shops throughout the bay area, and have even been able to purchase the ranch next door to Loren's family's ranch to help us accomplish our goals.
Over the last 13 years we have hosted countless ranch tours and non-profit events to help educate our community about local agriculture. We have volunteered our time and devoted our own personal resources to this cause. We have become certified organic, moved from selling our animals into the conventional market to finishing them on grass on our own land and selling them direct to consumers, restaurants, butcher shops, and grocery stores. We are one of the three local farms that is part of the Marin Carbon Project. We are actively fighting climate change and enhancing ecosystems through carbon farming.
We run our business the hard way. We don't cut corners. We are transparent to our customers. We put our livelihood at the mercy of mother nature and other factors beyond our control. We do this because we are passionate about local agriculture, because we want to produce food that we are proud to feed to our children and neighbors, and because we don't want to see small family agriculture disappear from Marin County. We have considered starting over in a more business friendly environment where the cost of living is less and land is easy to come by. So far we have made the decision to stay here, but that cannot last forever if Marin County is not actively supportive of our business needs.
It is very clear that consumers and community members support local agriculture and local meat. They want meat and dairy and other agricultural products that are raised locally and humanely. Consumers vote with their dollars and they pay a premium price to purchase from us and other local producers. They drive two hours to come take a ranch tour. They show up at the farmer's market in the pouring rain to buy their week's groceries. This all adds to the very fabric of the Marin County and surrounding community.
There is no reason why local agriculture and conservation efforts cannot coexist together. They can. They will. Cutting off local agriculture in the PRNS would simply ignore the rich history of agriculture in our area and the vibrant future of the local food movement. There is a very loud minority of folks that want to put local agriculture and the local food movement out of business. Please do not allow them to dictate policy changes that will effect many generations to come.
Thank you for your careful consideration.
Loren and Lisa Poncia
Stemple Creek Ranch
___________________________
# 2489
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Joseph Wenzel
___________________________
# 2490
Name: Riessen, Jerry
Correspondence: I fully support continued sustainable ranching and farming in the Seashore and GGNRA.
Jerry Riessen
___________________________
# 2491
Name: da Silva, Paul G
Correspondence: Among the alternatives proposed for the Point Reyes General Management Plan, I believe the fifth alternative (Continued Ranching and Removal of the Drakes Beach Tule Elk Herd) is the one that will best support the overall mission of the park. There are four basic reasons for this. First, the ranches are a historic part of the park. Second, grazing has been an important ecological factor on the park lands for thousands of years, and though cattle have somewhat different impacts than the original grazers, they are also more manageable under current conditions. Third, under modern conditions of restricted space, few predators and the presence of Johne's disease, the tule elk will always need management, and this is best accomplished in discrete areas. Fourth, the contribution of the ranches to the local food system is significant, and strengthening our local food system can help to reduce several environmental threats to the globe, the region and the park, one of the most important being climate change.
___________________________
# 2492
Name: Mohamad, Amine
Correspondence: National Park Services,
Hello! I am writing today to urge you to allow the Tule Elk to live and thrive free from human interference and violence. Human sprawl is eliminating wildlife habitat at an alarming rate, and we must take a stand for their right to life and freedom. Thanks for your time.
Thanks for all you do!
Amine Mohamad
___________________________
# 2493
Name: Oremland, Jeff
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I learned recently of several plans to cede use of land at Point Reyes National seashore to people who will essentially destroy it for some type of economic gain.
I write to you in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
___________________________
# 2494
Name: Mahoney, Cairn
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
___________________________
# 2495
Name: Rosenthal, Robert L
Correspondence: I strongly support the continuation of ranching in Point Reyes area.
___________________________
# 2496
Name: Marcoux, Grey A
Correspondence: Let the Tule Elk live and give priority to their care and presence in the park.
___________________________
# 2497
Name: Reyes, Lizzette E
Correspondence:
Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Lizzette Reyes
___________________________
# 2498
Name: T, Rut
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
___________________________
# 2499
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: Dear Superintendent,
I am writing in support of the free-roaming tule elk herds at Point Reyes National Seashore, and I object to any fencing, removal, sterilization or killing of elk in the park. Tule elk are an important part of the landscape of Point Reyes, and their recovery has been an exciting success story for restoring native species and ecosystems, consistent with the mission of the National Park Service.
Commercial lease holders on our public lands shouldn't dictate wildlife removal or exclusion policies. Any cattle-ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife, and shouldn't harm habitat for endangered species.
I also urge you to reject any conversion of national park lands to row crops or expansion of commercial livestock farming to introduce sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens or pigs. This would create conflicts with predators and degrade wildlife habitat and water quality.
The Park Service's amendment to the General Management Plan should prioritize protecting the natural values of Point Reyes National Seashore.
Sincerely,
Deborah Hoffmann
___________________________
# 2500
Name: N/A, N/A
Correspondence: Let the Tule Elk live at Point Reyes! They need to be preserved and they are an icon of the area. My family always go to see if we can see the elk when we visit Point Reyes as do many others from around the country and the world. They are a wonderful part of the ecosystem..

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Last updated: February 15, 2018

Contact the Park

Mailing Address:

1 Bear Valley Road
Point Reyes Station, CA 94956

Phone:

(415) 464-5100
This number will initially be answered by an automated attendant, from which one can opt to access a name directory, listen to recorded information about the park (i.e., directions to the park; visitor center hours of operation; weather forecast; fire danger information; shuttle bus system status; wildlife updates; ranger-led programs; seasonal events; etc.), or speak with a ranger. Please note that if you are calling between 4:30 pm and 10 am, park staff may not be available to answer your call.

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