Laws & Policies

 
FIREARMS INFORMATION

Legislation: As of February 22, 2010, a new federal law allows people who can legally possess firearms under applicable federal, state, and local laws, to legally possess firearms in this park. Section 512 of the Credit Card Accountability Responsibility and Disclosure Act of 2009, Public Law 111-24, 123 Stat. 1764-65.

Park User Responsibility: It is the responsibility of visitors to understand and comply with all applicable state, local, and federal firearm laws before entering this park. As a starting point, please see the North Dakota Century Code, Title 62.1.

Weapons Prohibited in Federal Facilities: Federal law also prohibits firearms in certain facilities in this park; those places are marked with signs at all public entrances. Refer to 18 U.S.C. § 930.

 

Superintendent Compendium

The Superintendent's Compendium is the summary of park specific rules implemented under 36 Code of Federal Regulations (36 CFR). It serves as public notice, identifies areas closed for public use, provides a list of activities requiring either a special use permit or reservation, and elaborates on public use and resource protection regulations pertaining specifically to the administration of the park. The Superintendent's Compendium does not repeat regulations found in 36 CFR and other United States Code and CFR Titles, which are enforced without further elaboration at the park level. Below is the compendium in its entirety.

 

Compendium Navigation Navigation

 
Compendium Superintendent Signature Image

A. INTRODUCTION

1. The Superintendent’s Compendium Described

The Superintendent’s Compendium is the summary of park specific rules implemented under 36 Code of Federal Regulations (36 CFR). It serves as public notice, identifies areas closed for public use, provides a list of activities requiring either a special use permit or reservation, and elaborates on public use and resource protection regulations pertaining specifically to the administration of the park. The Superintendent’s Compendium does not repeat regulations found in 36 CFR and other United States Code and CFR Titles, which are enforced without further elaboration at the park level.

The regulations contained in 36 CFR, Parts 1-7, are the basic mechanism used by the National Park Service (NPS) to preserve and protect the natural and cultural resources of the park and to protect visitors and property within the park. Parts 1 through 6 are general regulations applicable to all areas of the National Park system, and Part 7 contains special regulations specific to individual parks. Each of these Parts has many sections and subsections articulating specific provisions. Within some of these Part 1-7 sections and subsections, the Superintendent is granted discretionary authority to develop local rules to be responsive to the needs of a specific park resource or activity, park plan, program, and/or special needs of the general public.

As an example, 36 CFR 1.5(a) Closures and Public Use Limits provides the Superintendent certain discretion in allowing or disallowing certain activities. The authority granted by the Section, however, requires the Superintendent to comply with the Administrative Procedures Act (6 USC Section 551), which requires public notice on actions with major impact on visitor use patterns, park resources or those that are highly controversial in nature.

Another example is 36 CFR 1.6 Permits, which allows the Superintendent to require a permit for certain uses and activities in the park. This Section, however, requires that a list of activities needing a permit (and a fee schedule for the various types of permits) be maintained by the park.

A final example is 36 CFR 2.1(c) (1) Preservation of Natural, Cultural and Archeological Resources, which provides the Superintendent the authority to designate certain fruits, nuts, berries or unoccupied seashells which may be gathered by hand for personal use or consumption. This activity can occur, however, only if a written determination shows that the allowed activity does not adversely affect park wildlife, the reproductive potential of a plant species, or otherwise adversely affect park resources.

This Compendium should be used in conjunction with Title 36 CFR, Parts 1-7, to more fully understand the regulations governing the use and enjoyment of all the areas of the national Park System.

A copy of Title 36, CFR, can be purchased from the U.S. Government Printing Office at: (www.gpo.gov)
OR
Superintendent of Documents
P.O. Box 371954
Pittsburgh, PA 15250-7954
The CFR is also available on the Internet at: (www.ecfr.gov).

2. Laws and Policies Allowing the Superintendent to Develop This Compendium

The National Park Service (NPS) is granted broad statutory authority under Title 54 United States Code (U.S.C.) §100101(a) (formerly 16 U.S.C. 1a-1, “Organic Act”) to “….regulate the use of the National Park System by means and measures that conform to the fundamental purpose of the System units, which purpose is to conserve the scenery, natural and historic objects, and wild life in the System units and to provide for the enjoyment of the scenery, natural and historic objects, and wild life in such manner and by such means as will leave them unimpaired for the enjoyment of future generations.” In addition, Title 54 U.S.C. §100751(a) allows the NPS, through the Secretary of the Interior, to “prescribe such regulations as the Secretary considers necessary or proper for the use and management of System units.”

In 1970, Congress amended the NPS Organic Act to clarify its intentions as to the overall mission of the NPS. Through the General Authorities Act of 1970, Congress brought all areas administered by the NPS into one National Park System and directed the NPS to manage all areas under its administration consistent with the Organic Act of 1916.

In 1978, Congress amended the General Authorities Act of 1970 and reasserted System-wide the high standard of protection defined in the original Organic Act by stating “Congress further reaffirms, declares, and directs that the promotion and regulation of the various areas of the National Park System, as defined by Section 1 of this Title, shall be consistent with and founded in the purpose established by Section 1 of this Title, to the common benefit of all people of the United States.”

In addition to the above statutory authority, the Superintendent is guided by established NPS policy as found in the NPS Management Policies (2006). The Superintendent is also guided by more specific policies promulgated by the Director, National Park Service, in the form of Director’s Orders. As stated in the Management Policies, the primary responsibility of the NPS is to protect and preserve our national natural and cultural resources while providing for the enjoyment of these resources by visitor and other users, as long as use does not impair specific park resources or overall visitor experience. The appropriateness of any particular visitor use or recreational experience is resource-based and will vary from park to park; therefore, a use or activity that is appropriate in one park area may not be appropriate in another. The Superintendent is directed to analyze overall park use and determine if any particular use is appropriate. Where conflict arises between use and resource protection, where the Superintendent has a reasonable basis to believe a resource is or would become impaired, than that Superintendent is obliged to place limitations on public use.

3. Consistency of This Compendium with Applicable Federal Law and Requirements

The Superintendent’s Compendium is not considered a significant rule requiring review by the Office of Management and Budget under Executive Order 12866. In addition, this Compendium will not have a significant economic effect on a number of small entities nor impose a significant cost on any local, state or tribal government or private organization, and therefore does not fall under the requirements of either the Regulatory Flexibility Act or the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act.

The actions and requirements described in this Compendium are found to be categorically excluded from further compliance with the procedural requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) in Department of the Interior (DOI) Guidelines 516 DM 6 and as such, an Environmental Assessment will not be prepared.

4. Development of the Requirements of the Superintendent’s Compendium

As outlined above, the NPS has broad authority and responsibility to determine what types of uses and activities are appropriate in any particular National Park System area. The requirements of the Superintendent’s Compendium are developed through an analysis and determination process. The decision criteria used during this process are:
• Is the use or activity consistent with the NPS Organic Act and NPS policy?
• Is the use or activity consistent and compatible with the park’s enabling legislation, management objectives, and corresponding management plans?
• Will the use or activity damage the park’s protected natural and cultural resources and other protected values?
• Will the use or activity disturb or be in conflict with wildlife, vegetation, and environmental protection actions and values?
• Will the use or activity conflict with or be incompatible with traditional park uses and activities?
• Will the use or activity compromise employee or public safety?

5. Applicability of the Compendium

The rules contained in this Compendium apply to all persons entering, using, visiting or otherwise present on Federally owned lands, including submerged lands, and waters administered by the NPS within the legislative boundaries of the park. This includes all waters subject to the jurisdiction of the United States, including all navigable waters.

6. Enforcement of Compendium Requirements

NPS Law Enforcement Park Rangers enforce the requirements of the United State Code, 36 CFR, and this Superintendent’s Compendium.

7. Penalties for Not Adhering to the Compendium Requirements

A person who violates any provision of the regulations found in 36 CFR, Parts 1-7, or provisions of this Compendium, is subject to a fine as provided by law (18 U.S.C. 3571) up to $5,000 for individuals and $10,000 for organizations, or by imprisonment not exceeding six months (18 U.S.C. 3559), or both, and shall be adjudged to pay all court costs associated with any court proceedings. You may receive a list of fines associated with any particular provision by contacting the Chief Ranger at the park address found below.

8. Comments on the Compendium

The Compendium is reviewed annually and revised as necessary. The park welcomes comments about its program and activities at any time.

Written comments on the Compendium may be submitted to:
Brenda Todd, Superintendent
P.O. Box 9, Stanton, ND 58571

9. Effective Date of the Superintendent Compendium

The Superintendent’s Compendium is effective on the approval date listed on the first page of this document, and remains in effect until revised for a period up to one year.

10. Additional Information

Some of the terms used in this Compendium may have specific meaning defined in 36 CFR 1.4 Definitions.

11. Availability

Copies of the Compendium are available at 564 County Road 37. It may also be found at www.nps.gov/knri.

B. SUPERINTENDENT’S COMPENDIUM

In accordance with regulations and the delegated authority provided in Title 36, Code of Federal Regulations (“36 CFR”), Chapter 1, Parts 1-7, authorized by Title 54 U.S.C. §100751, the following provisions apply to all lands and waters administered by the National Park Service, within the boundaries of Knife River Indian Villages National Historic Site. Unless otherwise stated, these regulatory provisions apply in addition to the requirements contained in 36 CFR, Chapter 1, Parts 1-7.

Written determinations, which explain the reasoning behind the Superintendent’s use of discretionary authority, as required by Section 1.5(c), appear in this document identified by italicized print.

 
The labeled park map for the superintendent compendium.
Figure 1. Visitor Center Area map showing parking areas, interpretive/picnic shelter, replica earthlodge, and First Amendment areas.

I. 36 CFR §1.5 – VISITING HOURS, PUBLIC USE LIMITS, CLOSURES, AND AREA

DESIGNATIONS FOR SPECIFIC USE OR ACTIVITIES

(a)(1) The following visiting hours and public use limits are established for all or for the listed portions of the park, and the following closures are established for all or a portion of the park to all public use or to a certain use or activity:

Visiting Hours:
• The park’s visiting hours for the public are set at 6:00 A.M. to 10:00 P.M. Central Time. The Awatixa parking area (locally known as the Fishing Hole) will be open through the night for people actively fishing in accordance with State Fishing regulations
• Parking at the visitor center is allowed only in spaces that are delineated by painted lines on the lot. Parking for oversized vehicles shall be on the paved western portion of the parking lot.
• Portions of the park may be temporarily closed for wildlife management activities, herbicide treatments, vegetation removal, cultural resources management activities, wildland fires, and prescribed burns. These locations will be publicly signed.
• Food, smoking, and pets are prohibited inside the visitor center. Service animals are exempt from this regulation.

Closures:
• Any road, roadway, or area of Knife River Indian Villages National Historic Site closed by a sign or gate is closed to public motor vehicle use, except as authorized in Section 1.6 Permits.
Determination: Some roads within the park are closed to protect cultural resources. Driving on these resources may have irreversible adverse impacts.
• The park road leading to the NPS Maintenance Shop is closed to public access.

Determination: This road is closed to provide for public safety due to the frequent travel and/or use of heavy machinery, tools, and equipment by NPS personnel.

(a)(2) The following areas have been designated for a specific use or activity, under the conditions and/or restrictions as noted:
Camping:
Please refer to §2.10 for detailed camping area designations.

Determination: The park does not have potable water or restroom facilities which would be required for a regularly used campground.

The following restrictions and/or conditions are in effect for the specific uses or activities noted:

Segways:
• Segways and motorized scooters, as defined in 36 CFR 1.4 are motor vehicles. Pursuant to 36 CFR 1.5 (a) and 4.10(a), the park has imposed a restriction on the use of Segways and motorized scooters from all areas within the park including all park roads, trails, and sidewalks and walkways.

• However, any park visitor with a disability is permitted to use a Segway or motorized scooter in the park, including in structures and facilities, and on sidewalks and paved walkways, when such devices are used for the sole purpose of mobility assistance. Use of any mobility assistive devices, as outlined above, must also adhere to the following:

  • No person under 16 years of age may operate a Segway.
  • A person shall operate any mobility assistive device in a safe and responsible manner; maximum speed will not exceed more than 8 mph (“Segway sidewalk/Intermediate” key), so as not to endanger one’s self or any other park visitor.
  • A person riding any mobility assistive device upon and along a sidewalk or walkway, while crossing a roadway in a crosswalk, or on any other surface shall have all the rights and duties applicable to a pedestrian under the same circumstances, except that the mobility assistive device operator must always yield to pedestrians (park visitors).

Determination: Segways provide a reasonable mobility alternative for those who would otherwise be unable to visit the park village sites, or find it difficult to visit the village sites due to personal mobility limitations.

Electric Bicycles (e-bikes)
• The term “e-bike” means a two- or three-wheeled cycle with fully operable pedals and an electric motor of less than 750 watts (1 h.p.).
• E-bikes are allowed in Knife River Indian Villages National Historic Site where traditional bicycles are allowed. E-bikes are prohibited where traditional bicycles are prohibited. Except where use of motor vehicles by the public is allowed, using the electric motor to move an e-bike without pedaling is prohibited.
• A person operating an e-bike is subject to the following sections of 36 CFR part 4 that apply to the use of traditional bicycles: sections 4.12, 4.13, 4.20, 4.21, 4.22, 4.23, and 4.30(h)(2)-(5).

  • Except as specified in this Compendium, the use of an e-bike within Knife River Indian Villages National Historic Site is governed by State law, which is adopted and made a part of this Compendium. Any violation of State law adopted by this paragraph is prohibited.

Determination: The parks intent is to allow e-bikes to be used for transportation and recreation in a similar manner to traditional bicycles. Except on park roads and other locations where use of motor vehicles by the public is allowed, operators may only use the power provided by the electric motor to assist pedal propulsion of an e-bike.

Passenger Carrying Buses and Other Motor Vehicles

Buses and other motor vehicles are prohibited from idling their engines more than five minutes when parked in parking lot or interpretive areas.

Determination: Idling vehicles create noise and unhealthy pollutants which interferes with the park’s ability to give programs outside near these locations. The Superintendent may make exceptions from this depending on outside weather conditions and locale of planned activities.

Unmanned Aircraft, Balloons, Kites, and Remote Controlled Cars

Launching, landing, or operating an unmanned aircraft, balloons, kites and remote controlled cars from or on lands and waters administered by the National Park Service within the boundaries of Knife River Indian Villages National Historic Site is prohibited except as approved in writing by the Superintendent.

Definition: Unmanned Aircraft (UA) - The term "unmanned aircraft" means a device that is used or intended to be used for flight in the air without the possibility of direct human intervention from within or on the device, and the associated operational elements and components that are required for the pilot or system operator in command to operate or control the device (such as cameras, sensors, communication links). This term includes all types of devices that meet this definition (e.g., model airplanes, quadcopters, and drones) that are used for any purpose, including for recreation or commerce.

Determination: The Superintendent has determined that unmanaged or unrestricted recreational use of UAs within Knife River Indian Villages National Historic Site will create a disturbance to the park’s spiritual and tranquil atmosphere and would be considered disrespectful to native traditions and values. Additionally, these activities have been found to cause distress to the native wildlife, especially nesting birds, as these activities replicate predatory animal behavior.

II. 36 CFR §1.6 – ACTIVITIES THAT REQUIRE A PERMIT

(f) The following is a compilation of those activities for which a permit from the Superintendent is required:

§ 2.4(d) Carry or possess a weapon, trap, or net (excluding legal firearms)
• During park sponsored special events and other events approved by the Superintendent, persons may possess unloaded, historically accurate weapons under the terms of a permit issued by the Superintendent.
• Weapons must be unloaded and historically accurate to the time period when KNRI was an active trade center and village. Weapons can be defined as traditional weapons that Native Americans and European settlers may have used i.e. bow and arrows, atlatls, spears, muskets etc.
• All persons in possession of a weapon in the park must also be registered with Knife River Indian Villages NHS as an approved presenter or as a volunteer.

Determination: Weapons of this nature were routinely carried in the village areas and allowing presenters and volunteers to carry these weapons helps create the historic atmosphere of the time period. To provide for public safety, weapons will remain unloaded and only demonstrated under specific guidance as dedicated by the park Superintendent.

§ 2.5(a) Specimen collection (Take plant, fish, wildlife, rocks or minerals)

§ 2.10(a) The following camping activities:
• Camping during park sponsored special events including “Winter Outbound”, and other events approved by the Superintendent. Note: Camping without a permit is prohibited in Knife River Indian Villages National Historic Site.

§ 2.12 Audio Disturbances:
• (a)(4) Operation of a public address system in connection with a public gathering or special event for which a permit has been issued pursuant to §2.50 or §2.51

§2.37 Soliciting or demanding gifts, money goods or services (Pursuant to the terms and conditions of a permit issued under §2.50, §2.51 or §2.52)

§2.50(a) Conduct a sports event, pageant, regatta, public spectator attraction, entertainment, ceremony, and similar events

§2.51(a) Public assemblies, meetings, gatherings, demonstrations, parades and other public expressions of views

§2.52(c) Sale or distribution of printer matter that is not solely commercial advertising

§2.62 Memorialization:
(b) Scattering ashes from human cremation

§5.5 Commercial Photography/Filming:
• (a) Commercial filming of motion pictures or television involving the use of professional casts, settings or crews, other than bona fide newsreel or news television
• (b) Still photography of vehicles, or other articles of commerce or models for the purpose of commercial advertising.

§5.6(c) Use of commercial vehicles on park area roads
(The Superintendent shall issue a permit to access private lands within or adjacent to the park when access is otherwise not available)

III. GENERAL REGULATIONS

36 CFR §2.1 - PRESERVATION OF NATURAL, CULTURAL AND ARCHEOLOGICAL RESOURCES

(c)(1), (c)(2) The following fruits, nuts, berries or unoccupied seashells may be gathered by hand for personal use or consumption, in accordance with the noted size, quantity, collection sites and/or use or consumption restrictions:

• Up to two quarts per person, per day in possession of the following may be gathered for personal use or consumption:

  • Currant berries
  • Rose hips
  • Skunkbush sumac (leaves and berries)
  • Buffalo berries
  • Wild strawberries
  • Juneberries

Up to one gallon per person in possession per day of the following may be gathered for personal use or consumption:

  • Plums
  • Choke cherries

Determination: The specified quantities of fruits allowable for harvest will not adversely impact park resources, while still allowing for harvest and enjoyment.

36 CFR §2.2 - WILDLIFE PROTECTION

(d) The transporting of lawfully taken wildlife through the park is permitted under the following conditions and procedures:
• Licensed hunters may remove lawfully wounded wildlife that have escaped into the park and expired after notifying the park’s law enforcement officer, the Superintendent or designee, and under the supervision of a park ranger. The hunters may not carry any firearms or hunting weapons into the park unless given permission to do so by the accompanying park ranger or assigned employee. At the park ranger’s discretion the hunter will be allowed to safely shoot a severely injured animal (euthanize it) and allow the properly licensed hunter to tag and claim the animal.
• Commissioned park rangers may also euthanize a severely injured animal and allow the properly licensed hunter to tag and claim the animal. No engine-driven mechanical equipment such as a winch, hoist, all-terrain vehicle, etc. may be used to retrieve the animal. With the approval of a park ranger, street legal and licensed motor vehicles may be driven on park roads that are not open to public use in order to transport the animal out of the park.

(e) The viewing of wildlife within all areas of the park using an artificial light is prohibited.

36 CFR §2.4 – WEAPONS, TRAPS, AND NETS

(a)(2)(i) Weapons (excluding legal firearms), traps, or nets may only be carried, possessed or used at the following designated times and locations:

• During park sponsored special events and other events approved by the Superintendent, persons may possess unloaded, historically accurate weapons under the terms of a permit issued by the Superintendent.
• Weapons must be unloaded and historically accurate to the time period when KNRI was an active trade center and village. Weapons can be defined as traditional weapons that Native Americans and European settlers may have used i.e. bow and arrows, atlatl, spears, muskets etc.
• All presenters or volunteers in possession of a weapon in the park must also be registered with Knife River Indian Villages as an approved presenter or as a volunteer.

36 CFR §2.10 – CAMPING and FOOD STORAGE

(a) The sites and areas listed below have been designated for camping activities as noted. A permit system has been established for certain campgrounds or camping activities, and conditions for camping and camping activities are in effect as noted:
• Camping is authorized only during park sponsored events and other events approved by the Superintendent. All persons camping in the park must be registered with Knife River Indian Villages National Historic Site as a volunteer and or a participant of a park sponsored event.
• Camping is limited to areas designated by the Superintendent during park sponsored events and under the terms of a permit issued by the Superintendent.

36 CFR §2.11 – PICNICKING

Conditions for Picnicking:
• Picnicking is allowed anywhere that doesn’t disturb wildlife or cultural sites.

36 CFR 2.13 – FIRES

(a)(1) The lighting or maintaining of fires is generally prohibited, except as provided for in the following designated areas and/or receptacles, and under the conditions noted:
Designated Areas:
• Fires are permitted in park-provided grates or self-contained cooking units at park provided picnic tables locations. The dumping of hot or cold coals is prohibited. Fires may be restricted during times of high to extreme fire danger.

Determination: the dumping of coals and ashes is considered a fire hazard and also may lead to misidentification of archeological site cooking hearths.

• Fires are permitted in areas designated by the Superintendent during park sponsored special events including “Winter Outbound Adventure” and within the park’s earthlodge for special events and other events approved by the Superintendent.

Established Conditions for Fires:
• All persons using fires during park sponsored special events must be registered with Knife River Indian Villages National Historic Site as a volunteer or sponsor.
• Fires are prohibited during very high fire danger and/or as posted.

36 CFR §2.15 – PETS

(e) Pets may be kept by park residents under the following conditions:
• Pets are allowed on trails but must be on a leash no longer than six feet in length.(2.15 (a)(2) Pets are prohibited in any public buildings, even if they are carried; with the exception of service animals that assist humans with disabilities, i.e. dogs that guide the blind and hearing impaired.
• The western side of the Visitor Center parking lot is the designated area for tying a pet. Pets must not be troublesome or make excessive noise as determined by park employees. Pets must also be placed in a suitably comfortable atmosphere (i.e. shaded location with water available).
• Pet owners are responsible for removing pet excrement along trails or designated areas.

36 CFR §2.16 – HORSES and PACK ANIMALS

(b) The use of horses or pack animals is allowed on the following trails, routes or areas:
• In areas designated by the Superintendent under the terms of a permit for a park-sponsored special event.
(g) Other conditions concerning the use of horses or pack animals:
• All persons with horses and pack animals in the park must be registered with Knife River Indian Villages National Historic Site as a volunteer or a park sponsor.

36 CFR §2.18 – SNOWMOBILES

• Snowmobile operations are prohibited, including the frozen surface of the Knife River. Snowmobiles used by volunteers to assist with grooming the park’s cross country trails will be allowed if they follow state and local regulations and have prior written permission by the park Superintendent.

36 CFR §2.20 – SKATING, SKATEBOARDS and SIMILAR DEVICES

The use of roller skates, skateboards, roller skis, coasting vehicles, or similar devices are allowed only in the following areas:

• There are no designated areas in the park which allow for use of skating, skateboards or similar devices unless a permit is issued for a special park sponsored or sanctioned event, (i.e, run/walk/ride marathons).

36 CFR §2.21 – SMOKING

(a) The following portions of the park, or all or portions of buildings, structures or facilities are closed to smoking as noted:

• Smoking is prohibited in all government owned or leased vehicles and government buildings with the exception of permanent employee quarters. Smoking is also prohibited where posted, and along trails during periods of high, very high, and extreme fire danger as posted according to the park’s Fire Management Plan.

Determination: Smoking is prohibited in all government vehicles and buildings, except permanent employee residential quarters, to comply with government-wide health and safety policies. Smoking is prohibited where posted during high fire danger in order to protect park resources and reduce the risk of fire.

36 CFR §2.35 – ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES and CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES

(a)(3)(i) The following public use areas, portions of public use areas, and/or public facilities within the park are closed to consumption of alcoholic beverages, and/or to the possession of a bottle, can or other receptacle containing an alcoholic beverage that is open, or has been opened, or whose seal has been broken or the contents of which have been partially removed:

• Visitor center
• Interpretive shelter or program areas
• Earthlodge

Determination: Consumption of alcoholic beverages in these locations may be considered disrespectful to American Indians with ancestral roots in the park as well as negatively impact visitor experience of the park.

36 CFR §2.5 – RESEARCH SPECIMENS


• Collection of research specimens will be allowed only in conjunction with approved research collection permits or First Amendment rights as defined in 36 CFR 2.5. Written research proposals and collection requests must be submitted to the Superintendent with applications, allowing a minimum of 30 days for staff evaluation and consideration.
• Permits will not be issued if removal of the specimen would result in damage to other natural or cultural resources, adversely affect environmental or scenic values, or if the specimen is readily available outside of the park.
• Permits authorizing the killing of plants, fish, or wildlife can only be issued after approval of a written research proposal and determination that the collection will not result in derogation of park values or the purposes for which the park was established and that the collection has the potential for conserving and perpetuating the species collected.

36 CFR §2.51 – PUBLIC ASSEMBLIES AND MEETINGS

Permits are required for any public assemblies, meetings gatherings or other public expressions of opinion within the park. The designated location is in the grassy area between the parking lots, north of the side walk that connects them. An alternative area or a second approved location is in the northwest corner of the “overflow” parking on the south side of the main driveway into the Visitor’s Center (see Figure 1). Written applications for permits must be submitted to the superintendent at least 3 days prior to the date desired for the event.

36 CFR §2.52 – SALES OR DISTRIBUTION OF PRINTED MATTERS

Permits for this type of activity will be issued by the Superintendent. The designated location is at the front of the Visitor Center on the grass between the flagpole and the first lighted bollard. Written applications must be submitted to the Superintendent at least 7 days prior to the date desired for commencement of the activity.

36 CFR §2.62 – MEMORIALIZATION

(b) A permit is required for the scattering of ashes from cremated human remains, or in the following designated areas without a permit, in accordance with the following terms and conditions:
• Knife River Indian Villages does not have a designated area for scattering of ashes from cremated human remains. A permit is required for this activity.

Determination: Because Knife River Indian Villages NHS is a cultural park with significant archeological and ethnographic sites, modern human remains could be confused with past archeological sites. A permit for this activity is required by the Superintendent to prevent confusion from occurring.

NOTE ON CLOSED CIRCUIT TELEVISION USE IN THE PARK

In accordance with National Park Service (NPS) Law Enforcement Reference Manual 9 (RM-9), notice is hereby given that Knife River Indian Villages National Historic Site uses Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) security camera monitoring.

The NPS’s use of CCTV for law enforcement and security purposes and will only be to visually monitor public park areas and public activities where no constitutionally protected reasonable expectation of privacy exists. Such CCTV use – which will have adequate privacy and First Amendment safeguards – will be to help ensure public safety and security; facilitate the detection, investigation, prevention, and deterrence of terrorist activity; help ensure the safety of citizens and officers; help assist in the proper allocation and deployment of law enforcement and public safety resources; and help facilitate the protection of the innocent and the apprehension and prosecution of criminals.

This policy does not restrict the official use of CCTV in government administrative areas, including administrative buildings, jail holding facilities, revenue collection sites, etc., where the government may record/monitor its facilities. For example, the government may perform unrestricted video/audio recording at revenue collection points (entrance stations, visitor center counters, etc.). This policy does not restrict the use of an Audio/Visual Recording Device (AVRD) in patrol vehicles or officer- worn recording devices used by commissioned rangers.

Operation of CCTV cameras will be in accordance with NPS and Department policy. No person will be targeted or monitored merely because of race, religion, gender, sex, disability, national origin, or political affiliation or views.

Nothing in this policy statement is intended to create any rights, privileges, or benefits not otherwise recognized by law.

Last updated: September 7, 2020

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Mailing Address:

P.O. Box 9
Stanton, ND 58571

Phone:

(701) 745-3300

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