Katmai Terrane

 

About This Blog

Bears. Salmon. Volcanoes. Wilderness. Culture. These are the terranes of Katmai. Each is distinct, but in combination these features create a place like no other. Read about the uniqueness of Katmai in this blog.

Beyond Brooks Camp

August 30, 2020 Posted by: Cara Rohdenburg

A look at opportunities outside of the Brooks Camp Developed Area experienced by one ranger at Katmai.

 

Notes from the Field: The Eye of the Wolf

September 28, 2017 Posted by: Clint Augustson

A close encounter with a coastal wolf leads to reflections on the inner complexity of a top predator and the value of protecting animals that are often feared and misunderstood.

 

Katmai: A 99 Year-old Gem

September 21, 2017 Posted by: Rebecca Nourot

99 years ago, Katmai National Monument was formed to protect a geologic landscape. Today, Katmai National Park’s identity incorporates many facets other than geology.

 

The Mountains with No Name

September 21, 2017 Posted by: Clint Augustson

Contemplating nameless mountains can bring about a number of reflections on wilderness, local histories, and the power of words.

 

Notes from the Field: Soaring Above a World of Plenty

September 21, 2017 Posted by: Clint Augustson

Discovering Katmai by air during an aerial survey provides wonder and valuable data over the abundance of the park

 

Enter the Bear Den

July 29, 2017 Posted by: Clint Augustson

Exploring a bear den provides an intimate look at a bear’s ability to survive extreme circumstances

 

Notes from the Field: Puzzle Pieces of the Past

July 29, 2017 Posted by: Clint Augustson

Archeology in Katmai is both an art and a science: puzzling over layers of soil to tell stories about the people who once lived here.

 

U.S. Presidents and Katmai

February 14, 2016 Posted by: Michael Fitz

Throughout Katmai’s 97 years, several presidents have influenced Katmai’s purpose and the evolution. Which U.S. presidents established, expanded, or adjusted Katmai’s boundaries and why did they do so?

 

Extreme Camping on the Kamishak

September 14, 2014 Posted by: Perri Spreiser

Kamishak is a long, winding river which empties into Kamishak Bay at the very top of Katmai National Park and Preserve. It has little visitation...by people. I had the opportunity to go for work and spend four nights, five days on this river doing what was later explained to me as "extreme camping."

 

The Katmai Keystone

August 22, 2014 Posted by: Lacey Thomas

The Bristol Bay region is some of the largest runs of Pacific salmon in the world. Salmon are the keystone species of Katmai National Park. The Brooks Camp area and Katmai in general would not be what it is today without sockeye salmon. Everything present has been built on salmon and their annual migration from vast oceans to Katmai.

 

Removing a Wire Snare from 854 Divot

August 04, 2014 Posted by: Michael Fitz

Pop! When I saw the tranquilizing dart strike 854 Divot, I knew that there was much work to do and we needed to be quick about it, but I couldn’t help but feel a sigh of relief. “This might just work,” I thought, “We’ll be able to remove the snare.” Frankly, I never thought we’d get the opportunity.

 

Being Dominant

July 15, 2014 Posted by: Michael Fitz

Dominant male bears along the Brooks River gain many advantages over other bears. They can access the most preferred fishing spots when they choose, easily appropriate food from other bears, and have a higher likelihood of courting female bears and siring offspring. Gaining access to food allows bears to grow larger. Growing larger gives bears a greater chance to become reproductively successful.

 

Last updated: April 14, 2015

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King Salmon, AK 99613

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