The Noland Home

The Noland Home...Then...and Now...

Victorian house, President Harry S Truman descending stone steps in front Victorian house, President Harry S Truman descending stone steps in front

Left image
Harry S Truman leaving the Noland Home, circa 1946
Credit: Truman Library

Right image
Noland Home today at Harry S Truman National Historic Site
Credit: NPS

The Noland Home was where Harry Truman's aunt and uncle lived, as well as some of his favorite cousins. It has more than a family tie. One day, likely in 1910, Harry S Truman was reunited with the great love of his life while visiting his family here. Across the street, at 219 North Delaware, lived a beautiful young lady with beautiful blonde hair and blue eyes...and Harry Truman has been in love with her for twenty years. Her name was Bess Wallace.

Harry Truman was asked to return a dessert plate to 219 North Delaware. He raced across the street, rang the bell...and Miss Wallace answered. "Come in," she said.

That walk across Delaware Street that day changed their history...and ours.

 

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Transcript

And, um, oh he loved any kind of a joke...just any kind of a joke. And he was witty, he was funny himself. His conversation was full of fun, and full of funny, witty remarks.

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Duration:
25.093 seconds

Mary Ethel Noland was Harry S. Truman’s first cousin. Her mother, Margaret Ellen Truman, was a sister of John Anderson Truman, who was Harry S. Truman’s father. After the Truman family moved to Independence in 1890, Ethel Noland and Harry Truman developed a close relationship. During her lifetime, Ethel became the family genealogist and researched many of the branches of the family’s history. Miss Noland died in 1971. This clip courtesy Truman Library.

 
A pale yellow house with a large columned front porch.
Home to Harry's favorite cousins, the Noland Home at 216 N. Delaware sits directly across the street from the Truman Home.

NPS Photo

Harry S Truman National Historic Site acquired the home of Joseph T. Noland and Margaret Ellen Truman Noland in 1991. Significant planning and rehabilitation have been necessary to repair the structure, built in three stages between 1858 and 1910. The first phase, completed in 2006, raised and placed the structure on a new foundation.
The interior of the structure was completely gutted. All of the windows were repaired. New plumbing and electrical systems were installed. On the exterior, rotten siding was replaced and the house received a new roof and a fresh coat of paint. Historic interior features like woodwork and stained glass were preserved. Original fixtures, samples of wall coverings and exterior architectural elements have become part of the museum collection.
 
three images showing various exhibits found in the Noland House including a vintage phone, framed photographs on a wall, and a hat on a hook.
Exhibits in the Noland Home highlight the courtship between Harry and Bess, as well as life in the Truman neighborhood during and after his presidency.

NPS Photo

 
 
Two men and two women posing; one is Harry S Truman
Photo postcard of Harry S. Truman with his two Noland cousins. From left to right: Fielding Houchens, Nellie Noland, Harry S. Truman, and Mary Ethel Noland. On the right, Truman has written "This is us H.S.T." Underneath the picture, he has written the first initial of everyone, and written "me" beneath his picture. Circa 1905.

Truman Library

 

The Noland Home

The Noland Home is open Wednesdays-Sundays 8:30 AM to 4:30 PM.
Operating Schedule Details

Last updated: October 24, 2022

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Contact Info

Mailing Address:

223 North Main Street (Visitor Center/ Truman Home Ticketing Station)
Independence , MO 64050

Phone:

816-254-9929
The park is open to the public Wednesdays-Sundays. The park is closed on Mondays and Tuesdays. Administrative staff work Monday-Friday. For Administration staff, please call (816) 254-2720, Mondays to Fridays, 8AM-4PM. All times central. (We like to call it Truman Time.)

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